Questions on replacing feed line

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Old 04-20-11, 11:24 AM
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Questions on replacing feed line

I am in the planning stages of finishing off the rest of my basement and the have a question regarding the oil feed line.

I life in a typical raised ranch home with oil hot water boiler. The Weil Mclain boiler is installed by the chimney in the middle of the house, and my oil tank is on the back wall by the garage. It has an oil pump assembly on the front of it. The oil feed line is currently a copper pipe that runs along the foundation of the house up to a inside curtain wall and then runs across the floor along this wall to the boiler. It is covered in thin concrete and is easy to access.

The problem is that I intend to have a doorway right in the middle of the wall that the line parallels.

What I would really like to do is run the line through framed walls, up and over a door rough-in and back down to the oil boiler in the closet. What I would really prefer to avoid is having to cut the foundation concrete and bury the line.

Will the existing oil pump be sufficient for this, or will I need a supplemental or larger pump (not even sure if these exist)? Is this going to voilate any building codes and will I have to pull a permit? Are there any flexible heavily jacketed solutions that I could use?

Also, as far as the details of replacing the line, my thinking was to close the feeder valve at the tank, disconnect the line, run the furnace until the line is empty, then disconnect and remove it, install the replacement, purge the line and start it back up. Is this reasonable?

I did try to search the forums but perhaps I don't have the right terms since I got no results and I would assume this is a common topic. Any pointers would be appreciated.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 02:59 PM
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you didnt hear me say it but, dont pull permits for that. any way you can rout the line under the door way. the thing with oil lines is you want to make sure you can pretty much see all of the lines in case you have a leak somewhere. how old is your oil tank? maybe you can either get a new one and put it near the boiler now, or move your existing one. for the movement of the tank i would definately suggest permits.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 03:57 PM
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Not sure on the age of the tank, but it appears to be in perfect condtion still. There is no surface rust on it and the rolled edges are free of rust as well.

I could chisel out the space to run it under the door but would prefer to avoid that if possible. Unfortunately the only place I could move the oil tank to would block one of the doorways, so moving it really won't help.

It appears my only two options are tunneling under the door to keep the level flat, or routing it through the studs and over top of the door.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 04:05 PM
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are you putting in a drop ceiling. you can always run it through that. its sucks when the boiler is directly in the middle of the house. if you run it through walls and areas you can never get at you may have future problems. any way to move the tank outside.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 04:35 PM
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It has an oil pump assembly on the front of it.
Are you saying that your OIL TANK has a pump installed on it?

Please tell us a bit more about that...

Are there any flexible heavily jacketed solutions that I could use?
I would recommend that you use the fuel line that has a plastic jacket applied over the copper. This is one manufacturer, there are several... googling will bring up all kinds of hits... just the nature of the keywords used to search.

Fuel Oil Coated Copper Tubing

another:
Order EnviroTube

yet another:
http://www.muellerindustries.com/upl...ted%20Tube.pdf

It's generally frowned upon these days for copper tubing/piping to be in contact with concrete.
 

Last edited by NJT; 04-20-11 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 04-20-11, 04:37 PM
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Fuel oil tanks located indoors rust from the inside out. The get water inside from condensation and also minute amounts that come in with the fuel. Exterior condition will NOT be a good indicator of the condition of the tank.

I suggest that you have the tank ultrasound tested to determine the thickness of the metal at the bottom, sides and top. Also, get some water finding paste (from your oil dealer) and smear it on a stick you can insert into the tank. This will tell you if there is any water sitting on the bottom of the tank and also any sludge.
 
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Old 04-20-11, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by NJ Trooper
Are you saying that your OIL TANK has a pump installed on it?
The boiler itself has the pump, not the oil tank, sorry if I was unclear on that.

Originally Posted by RDSTEAM
are you putting in a drop ceiling?
Regarding the ceiling, we were planning on doing a full refinish downstairs with sheetrock ceiling. As far as access goes, if I detect a leak, I have no problem tearing down the sheetrock and putting new stuff back up, it takes maybe an afteroon for the length of the run I am talking about. I suppose I could even run it across the ceiling instead of in the wall so that it is obvious if it leaks, but one of the points this post was about is whether I have to keep the run level or if it is okay to gain a lot of elevation over the run.

Originally Posted by Furd
I suggest that you have the tank ultrasound tested to determine the thickness of the metal at the bottom, sides and top. Also, get some water finding paste (from your oil dealer) and smear it on a stick you can insert into the tank. This will tell you if there is any water sitting on the bottom of the tank and also any sludge.
Furd: regarding the oil tank ultrasound, I will definately look into that, I was not aware that I could have that done. Would a general oil company be able to do that, or is it going to be a specialist thing? Also, is the cost going to be high enough that I'd be better off just replacing it to be on the safe side?
 
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Old 04-20-11, 05:20 PM
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If there is ANY possible way to avoid running the line up and over, then do so... overhead lines are always troublesome. Air and gas bubbles will accumulate in the line and stop the burner at the worst possible time, 3AM, Sunday, Christmas Eve, 100 year blizzard, ten below zero.

If you absolutely MUST run the line overhead, then absolutely invest in a TigerLoop Oil DeAerator setup. See:

Fuel Oil DeAerators
 
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