Excess carbon build up on burners

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Old 01-09-12, 06:44 PM
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Excess carbon build up on burners

We heat our house with the Teledyne Laars Mini-therm II boiler. The problem is that the burners keep accumulating carbon and rust spots (according to the technician, who's been in several times, including today, to clean them). They were replaced in 2006. The boiler is in our crawl space, close to a sump pump. The crawl space is often damp (although the boiler is never underwater). The tech thinks that proximity to the sump is the problem, causing condensation (and hence buildup and rust) on the burners. I've tried covering over the sump partially with plywood, but obviously can't seal it (although I might try sealing the area near the burners).

Is there another reason for the accumulation of rust and carbon on the burners that I might look into?

If it's the sump, any ideas?

Many thanks!
 
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Old 01-09-12, 06:56 PM
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This is a gas-fired boiler? Carbon buildup is usually related to insufficient air, i.e., a rich mixture. "Sealing the area around the burners," will just starve the air all the more.

I think a crawl space is a strange location for a boiler.
 
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Old 01-09-12, 07:04 PM
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Excess carbon build up on burners

Well, it's really a basement (c. 5 ft clearance, with plenty of air, as far as I can tell).
 
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Old 01-09-12, 07:31 PM
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Well, it's really a basement (c. 5 ft clearance, with plenty of air, as far as I can tell).
OK, but the carbon buildup suggests otherwise. I think you need to have a combustion analysis done, and appropriate adjustments made. This could be a safety issue.

It's hard for me to visualize a 5' basement or crawlspace, with a boiler in it. How does anybody gain access to it for inspection or maintenance? How could it have been installed originally?
 
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Old 01-09-12, 08:13 PM
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Access isn't really a problem, although it's not entirely comfortable. It's an older house, so it's not a completely sealed basement.

What would a combustion analysis entail, please, and why do you think there's a safety issue? The exhaust fan is new and seems to be working.
 
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Old 01-09-12, 08:38 PM
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why do you think there's a safety issue?
When there soot produced by a gas fired appliance, it almost always coincides with HIGH CO production.

It's imperative that you have this problem rectified.

Make sure that you have CO detectors in the home and they all work.

What would a combustion analysis entail, please
It means getting a technician in with the proper equipment to make the measurements and adjustments that are needed.
 
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Old 02-07-12, 11:29 PM
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Excess Carbon

See reply regarding slide adjuster and cleaner orfice....Sandmantech
 
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Old 02-08-12, 03:26 PM
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Sandman, thanks for stopping by, but I don't think anyone has an idea what you mean!

What do you mean?
 
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