It's hard to turn off the hot water in baseboard radiator.

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Old 01-16-12, 10:02 PM
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It's hard to turn off the hot water in baseboard radiator.

Hi,

Happy New Year!

A few days ago, cold weather made one of my baseboard radiators frozen. Now it's getting warmer, so the ice inside the copper pipe melted and a strong gush of water shooting out of the pipe. I used a piece of rubber belt to wrap it up tight. Now water gush becomes dripping.

I have to turn the water off before soldering the broken pipe. But I tried to turn it off, there still some water coming out of the pipe.

It's a 4 zone system. I thought I shut off the valve in the right zone where I have problem. How come the water still coming out.

Thanks in advance

John
 
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Old 01-17-12, 05:05 AM
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It would take two valves to isolate a zone.
Take a buch of pictures of the whole system and the folks here can help you out.


Peterr
 
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Old 01-17-12, 01:15 PM
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I have to turn the water off before soldering the broken pipe.
Very true, but how do you propose fixing the break? You can't just butter up the crack or split with solder - it won't hold. You'll need to cut out the section of pipe and replace it, using copper couplings as necessary.

If you want a temporary fix, use a pipe repair clamp.
 
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Old 01-17-12, 02:28 PM
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need to drop the water level from the boiler and as stated you still have the 2nd pipe there with pressure in it...shut servcie switch off...zero out the boiler pressure guage keep draining till you hear air sucking in the break.if the pipe is just a little split might tap it lightly to pinch it back together then clean it and soft solder it..keep the heat back and let the solder melt and build up.....how cold did the house get for you to bust a pipe with hot water moving in a system....
 
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Old 01-17-12, 04:06 PM
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if the pipe is just a little split might tap it lightly to pinch it back together then clean it and soft solder it..
If it's just a pinhole or a 1/32" crack, that might be OK. But, personally, I would replace the section of pipe that is leaking. There will be a stress riser at the points where the leak is buttered up with solder, inviting future failure.

When I've seen copper pipe ruptured due to freezing, it tends to split axially, along the length of the pipe. That's where the maximum stress, the hoop-stress, occurs in a pipe under pressure. Solder shouldn't be used to resist pressure - only to join and seal connections that are restrained by the pipe itself.
 
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Old 01-17-12, 04:16 PM
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What about a sharkbite slip coupling? at least temporarily until the heating season is over?

3/4 in. Brass Push-to-Fit Slip Coupling-U3016A at The Home Depot

You'll need one of these also

3/4 in. PEX PTC Demount Clip Coupling-U712A at The Home Depot
 
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Old 01-19-12, 02:35 PM
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Thanks folks for replying.

It is a pinhole not a large crack. Frankly, I hate to cut the pipe and use no-stop coupling to connect them (both ends) because the frozen water already made the pipe expand a little close to the pinhole. So the 3/4 coupling that I bought won't fit, unless I use a pipe expander (that I don't have).

Is that possible to cut a piece of new copper pipe wide open, not cross-cut, but a cut along the pipe-line, then wrap the piece of copper up around the pinhole and solder it? The 2 ends of cut pipe won't meet after wrap it up because the damaged pipe is swollen. Or not sure if I can find a piece of copper sheet (that is thick enough) to wrap up the problem pipe.

Thanks in advance. I'll try to take some pics around the furnace next time. You guys are right that it's hard to help me out without pics.

BTW, I tried to find Push-to-Fit couplings at HomeDepot but the guys there told me they never heard of it.

Take care.

John
 
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Old 01-19-12, 03:28 PM
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Not sure if it is the best way, but for a temporary fix you could drain below the leak, split a copper pipe in half slather both sides with JB Weld and use 2 or 3 hose clamps to hold it together. JB will hold up to the heat and the hose clamps should hold the pressure. Could possibly flux the pipe and use solder, but I think the JB would hold. Could even use the quik set kind to limit down time
 
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Old 01-19-12, 04:04 PM
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I bet a fix like that would last durn near forever!
 
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