Need help finding a red Bell & Gossett pressure relief valve part # 2899.973


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Old 03-09-12, 07:40 AM
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Need help finding a red Bell & Gossett pressure relief valve part # 2899.973

I have a gas boiler and the pressure relief valve needs replaced and I can't locate the part. It is a Bell & Gossett 12LB part # 2899.973 pressure relief valve. It also has a B8 and GU. My house is steam heated.

 
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Old 03-09-12, 03:26 PM
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Don, there are more than one manufacturer of pressure relief valves. You don't HAVE to replace it with a B&G exact part. As long as it FITS, and FUNCTIONS, and has the same RATINGS, you could use any one...

Why does the valve need replaced?

Make sure that if the valve is leaking that it's not leaking because it's doing what it's SUPPOSED TO BE DOING! You should NEVER EVER have 12 LB ( PSI ) of pressure in your residential steam boiler!

What does the pressure gauge read when the valve leaks?

Steam is nothing to mess with... it CAN be DANGEROUS, and CAN KILL !

Please understand what you are doing before you proceed. Please tell us more about why you want to change this relief valve.
 
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Old 03-09-12, 03:35 PM
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Don, take an in focus, well lighted photo of the valve you are looking for.

Set up a FREE account at Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket and upload the pic to a PUBLIC album. Let us have a look at what you are working on.

Please also tell us the make and model of the boiler.
 
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Old 03-09-12, 04:22 PM
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Appreciate the help!

My original problem was a circulatory pump failure. A plumber came in and replaced the springs in the circulating water pump. Then he bled air from the system (radiators). After this process the PSI went to 21 psi. The manual calls for 12 psi. I have a Series 22A Burnham Corp gas boiler. To hold the temperature at 12 psi the plumber shut the water off to the pressure reducing value and told me maybe the valve is bad. I think our local plumber is not that familiar with boilers.

Working on the picture. Currently at https://picasaweb.google.com/1153182...LbGudSzsd6WmwE
 
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Old 03-09-12, 04:42 PM
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We need to back up a little bit here...

You originally said "relief" valve, but your recent post does say "reducing" valve, and that's what it is.

You do not have steam heat, you have 'forced hot water' heat.

I might agree that your pressure reducing valve is bad... but the very first thing to always do is to click and read the following:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...ure-gauge.html

There are many manufacturers of that type of relief valve, should you find after verifying your pressure gauge that you need one.

B&G current model is FB-38
Watts mode 1156
Taco makes one, and several others.
Any one of these will work.

You sould also consider bringing the system up to code by installing a BACKFLOW PREVENTER at the same time the valve is changed. Watts 1156 comes 'bundled' with a 9D backflow preventer already connected.

Patriot Supply - 0386461

Adding a new positive shutoff BALL VALVE in the water feed line is also a good idea.

Make sure to hook a hose up to the water line and FLUSH IT OUT FULL BLAST before installing the new reducing valve, or you will get crud from the line into the new valve, and you will be pi55ed becuz it will leak... just like the old one!

To hold the temperature at 12 psi the plumber shut the water off to the pressure reducing value
And this is fine, as long as you have no leaks in the system. So, keep an eye on the pressure, and add tiny amounts of water as needed. If you find the pressure dropping continuously, look for leaks. (whitish/greenish mineral deposits around fittings).

By the way, you didn't mean 'temperature', you meant pressure...

more...
 
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Old 03-09-12, 04:48 PM
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The other thing you will likely soon find out is that your expansion tank needs service.

What type of tank do you have? A large steel tank in the joists above the boiler ?

Or one that looks like a propane tank from a gas grill ?
 
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Old 03-10-12, 07:57 AM
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More info and pictures

Yes, you are correct. It has the expansion tank that looks like a propane tank (P-X Tank). I placed some pictures here:

https://picasaweb.google.com/1153182...LbGudSzsd6WmwE
 
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Old 03-10-12, 08:12 AM
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Interesting... I can't recall seeing that make/model tank and air scoop... and Google turns up zilch on it. Just the same, it is a 'diaphragm type tank' ... and there must be a Schrader (tire valve) on the bottom of the tank, correct?
 
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Old 03-10-12, 08:18 AM
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Yes, a Schrader is at the bottom of the tank. I just posted some additional pictures of all the components.
 
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Old 03-10-12, 08:19 AM
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You understand the steps?

1. Be sure that your pressure gauge on the boiler is accurate by verifying it. This so that you don't run around in circles and possibly replace something that you don't need to replace.

2. Check the air charge on your expansion tank. Instructions can be found in the post linked below:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...sion-tank.html

3. If the pressure reducing valve needs replacement, you have plenty of room along that horizontal section of pipe to do so. You DO have a 'check valve' in the water line, to the right of the reducing valve, but it's not a code approved part. If your valve does need replacement, now would be the time to bring that part up to code. I mentioned adding a ball valve in-line for a positive shut-off... if the other valve on that line is in OK condition and seals properly, you don't HAVE to add the ball valve, but since you will have the pipes apart, it doesn't make much sense not to.
 
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Old 03-10-12, 08:21 AM
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I don't trust that gauge. With the boiler hot, it looks like it's reading under 10 PSI.

Looks like you've got a perfectly fine shutoff valve in the line to the boiler... no problem there!
 
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Old 03-10-12, 08:24 AM
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THANKS! Appreciate the help!!!!!

Thank you. Now its time to get to work!
 
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Old 03-10-12, 08:28 AM
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Yeah, me too... nice day here to clean up outside after our 'non' winter...

Good Luck!
 
 

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