Circulation Pump Leak

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-10-12, 04:55 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Circulation Pump Leak

Hello,

I have a taco model 110 circulation/pump unit that has developed a leak near the pump housing. It seems as if itís coming from where the motor shaft goes into the housing. I have attached a picture and placed an arrow in the area of the leak. Iím not sure if itís a seal or what it really is. It has been varying from an occasional drip to a very rapid drip. It seems like it is different every time the unit is finished circulating. Yesterday it was enough to fill a gallon bucket in a 24 hour period. I fear this leak will only worsen in time and want to address it quickly and efficiently.

The question I have is should I shell out the about $280 for a whole unit even though the motor is good, or is there a cheaper option to rebuild or replace a seal in the pump section of this unit.

Any information or suggestions are welcome and extremely appreciated.

Thank you,

Matt

 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-10-12, 05:11 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: US
Posts: 552
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hello Matt,
Tell us about the size of your house and heating system.
There are other folks here that know more about this stuf than i do.
However.
I believe you can replace that pump with a Taco 007 - bolt in, for about $70.
More than likely it will work just fine.


Peter

PS
In the event you repair the existing pump:
The NJ Trooper is likely going to want you to put a connector on the cable to the pump. The way it is now, there is no ground. Worse yet, the wires could chafe and short out.
 
  #3  
Old 03-10-12, 05:36 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 2,897
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
You can certainly replace that portion of the pump. Be prepared to drain, refill, and vent the system. I would wait until spring.

Adding a connector to the BX cable, as Peter mentioned, is needed. Parts: 50 cents, labor zero, if you DIY.

It looks like the motor may have been over-oiled? A couple of drops once a year is enough.
 
  #4  
Old 03-10-12, 05:53 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
2 story home
Approximately 1700 square feet of heating space
Hot water baseboard heating.
I've been told that this furnace is too large for this home and is not energy efficient multiple times.

Placing a rubber grommit where those wires enter the motor has been something I have been meaning to do for a while. When I take on this project, I will fix that.

Furnace is a New Yorker with the specs on the below photo.

You can see the wet area in the photo where the leak is behind the unit.




 
  #5  
Old 03-10-12, 06:05 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
While I'm posting pictures, perhaps I should show you the whole system. The wood boiler, while functional; is shut down. It has not been used since I have purchased the home 4 years ago.

I'm posting this fact in case it may be relevant.

 
  #6  
Old 03-10-12, 06:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 2,897
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Your DOE rating seems quite high for 1700 sq ft, even in Maine. But, economically, you can't justify replacing the boiler only to down-size it. Just fix the pump.
 
  #7  
Old 03-10-12, 06:57 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
In case you haven't found it yet, here is the parts list for your pump:

http://www.taco-hvac.com/uploads/Fil...ry/104-003.pdf

Instruction sheet:

http://www.taco-hvac.com/uploads/Fil...ry/102-052.pdf

I think (verify before purchasing!) these are the seals you want... your choice to use the expensive OEM or the cheap Chinese:

Patriot Supply -

No, not a rubber grommet... it should be a proper 'connector' for MC (or BX if you will) cable. Like this:


image courtesy foxelectricsupply.com

You may find that a 'right angle' would work better for you:


image courtesy aifittings.com

Make sure to use a 'redhead' (aka anti-short bushing) on the end of the cable as shown in the bottom pic:


image courtesy popularmechanics.com
 
  #8  
Old 03-10-12, 07:32 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's awesome Nj' Thanks a ton! Thanks for the connector references too. I will definitely go with the proper method you posted.

I will buy these seals and tackle the job within the next couple of weeks as long as the leak doesn't get worse. I want the weather to warm up a bit before I have shut the system down while I work on this.

In your opinion... are these difficult to replace for a guy with amatuer to moderate mechanical skills?

More than likely I will have questions about the draining and refilling of the system. There are however... plenty of valves where I believe I can isolate this section without having to drain the entire system. I will post questions about this when I get the seals though.

Once again, thanks a lot. Great References and how to's.

Matt
 
  #9  
Old 03-10-12, 11:37 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,489
Received 32 Votes on 24 Posts
I've never worked on a Taco pump but I once worked in a facility that had about ten thousand similar Bell & Gossett pumps. (Only slightly exaggerated.) We found out the hard way that replacing just the seal had a failure rate of better than 75% so we went to changing the entire "bearing bracket" assembly.

But I agree with PeterNH that replacement with the Taco 007 is the preferred option. Measure the distance between the flanges and post back to see if it will be a simple R&R job. I also agree with gilmorrie that as long as it is just a drip try to make it to spring before draining the system.
 
  #10  
Old 03-11-12, 07:15 AM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The taco 007 sounds like an option too if it is thought to be an adequate enough of a unit to circulate water through my system.

As far as replacing a whole bracket, is this what you are referring too....

eBay - New & used electronics, cars, apparel, collectibles, sporting goods & more at low prices
 
  #11  
Old 03-11-12, 07:27 AM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
BTW... 6 1/2 inches between the flanges on the Taco 110 inline.

The Taco 007 is 5 inches between the flanges. I know this because I have a taco 007 sitting not too far from the 110. (look at my picture with both boilers in it) The 007 looks like it circulates water to the wood fired boiler that has been shut down.

It probably wont be a simple job and will require some modification of the current piping but I think it may be the option I will go with if someone can reassure that the 007 will be adequate.

Thanks,

Matt
 
  #12  
Old 03-11-12, 08:17 AM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: US
Posts: 552
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hello Matt,
Can you tell us how many zones there are
What size pipe is in each zone
and how long the pipe are in each zone, including the basebaords.
Plus the size/lkength of any common pipes.

Although, without any of that, i'd be guessng the 007 can do the job.

I don't understand the plumbing, but when the wood boiler was used alone.. it looks like maybe the 007 sent the water around the house?
Thus likely adequate. ?

Peter
 
  #13  
Old 03-11-12, 09:38 AM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
NHÖ

One heating zone.

There is approximately 120 feet of 1 1/2 inch pipe that comes from the furnace and goes around the perimeter of the basement ceiling. This pipe supplies all of the 3/4 inch pipes that go upstairs to the heating registers. This 3/4 inch piping total is an estimate based on how much pipe I think it took to get to each register and how much pipe is inside the fins. Also see my pictures of the heating registers. There are 15 registers in all. 5 upstairs x approximately 30 feet per register for the trip up, the zig zag through the fins, and the way back down = 150 feet of 3/4 inch.
10 registers downstairs for approximately 12 feet each (same trip scenario with the exception of an 8 - 9 foot rise). 120 feet of 3/4 inch for the downstairs.

All together, my estimate is about 120 feet of 1 1/2 foot pipe and 270 feet of 3/4 inch pipe including the registers. I have included pictures.

Also Iím not sure if that 007 F-2 that is currently on that system ever circulated water in the entire system or if it moved water between boilers. I know nothing about this set up unfortunately. The previous owner never used this system and never bothered to inquire about it when he purchased this home. But, I have put more pictures with an explanation as to how the piping is arranged if it helps.

A Ė Goes into the top of the wood fired boiler
B Ė Comes out of the back of the wood fired boiler
Iím not sure of the direction of flow
C returns from that 1 1/2 inch line that feeds the register lines and makes a 90 degree angle down to the taco 110 just behind the flue. This line goes into the current boiler and comes out asÖ
D, which rises and supplies that 1 1/2 that feeds the register lines. According to the arrows on a little flow check tag on this pipe, the water flows out of the boiler towards D.

I hope this helps some. Let me know if there is any other information you need.

Thanks,

Matt










 
  #14  
Old 03-11-12, 10:06 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
The Taco 007 is 5 inches between the flanges
It is?

http://www.taco-hvac.com/uploads/Fil...ry/101-029.pdf

You say that's an ' F2 ' ? Don't know that I've seen an F2 ... but the F5 has a flange to flange of 6-3/8" and I have little doubt that you will have no trouble flexing the pipe enough to pick up an eighth inch. I also have little doubt that the 007 will work just fine.

I believe that the 007 that is in there now is set up to pump the wood boiler into the main boiler and go from there.

That's quite the odd looking monoflo tee fitting... don't know that I've ever seen one of those... close-up available?
 
  #15  
Old 03-11-12, 12:14 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm guessing this may be an older one or the fact that it is a -F2, but you can see that it does measure 5 inches. That being said, the specs on the 007-F5 that you sent me come as really good news. The pipes will definitely be able to compensate for a fraction of an inch. New Circulator, minimal cost, no plumber, Good News.

As for the Monoflow Tee Fitting... I had to google what that even was... LOL But, there are two different types that I can see on this piping. I have taken pictures of both for you.

Thanks for all of your information btw... you are a huge help.

Matt





 
  #16  
Old 03-11-12, 01:11 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
The B&G is the one we're all familiar with, and that one probably dates to the 50's, perhaps earlier...

But that 'Master Dual Flow' ... that's a new one on me! I need to look that one up. Thanks for the pic!

That pump is a few years old too... the 007-F5 is definitely bigger than that.
 
  #17  
Old 03-11-12, 01:54 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Good Call Nj' The home was built in 1948. I'm sure much of that piping is original. I want to thank you for all of your help as well as all the others who helped. I'm gonna go with the 007-F5 as a replacement. I've seen it as low as $84 which is a lot better than the almost $300 for the inline 110.

I will probably swing back in when It's time to install it for questions about draining and refilling the system even though it looks like this whole section can be isolated by shutting down nearby valves.

Great forum, great help, and hopefully one day I can drop in a bit of knowledge in return.

Thanks again guys,

Matt
 
  #18  
Old 03-11-12, 02:02 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
How about $73.50 ?

Patriot Supply - 007-F5

Be mindful of the flow direction when you install, it's all too easy to put these in upside down!
 
  #19  
Old 03-11-12, 02:07 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
$73... Even better! Thanks a bunch! In return... how about a backside shot of that valve? LOL. It has additional information on it.

 
  #20  
Old 03-12-12, 04:51 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
What happened to the reply I sent yestiddy? I guess I forgot to hit send!

I googled and googled and came up with nothing on that company or fitting! I even checked the patent office... nada... there was a guy, Edward Wood, who had a few heating patents, and one of his was for a 'dual flow' device, but this isn't that. Different animal. Maybe they never got a patent issued?

Still, interesting... I like History!
 
  #21  
Old 03-12-12, 05:32 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 28
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The same one is 71.95 at Pexsupply.com and they have a promo code "SAVE5" that brings it down to 66.95 if that helps.
 
  #22  
Old 03-12-12, 08:41 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 409
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
What a strange design! How can that Master-Dual-Flow even work effectively? The "T"s are so close together. It would seem there would be lots of turbulence for the 2nd pipe branch down the line. And think about head loss...
 
  #23  
Old 03-13-12, 12:00 PM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's Interesting....

I'm wondering if that "Pat. App. For." means that it was Applied for, but it never came in which explains why it's so rare.

As for the circulator... I picked one up at Lowe's for $78. I figure the additional cost would balance out with shipping and handling charges.

I will be installing it shortly and update this post with the results.

Matt
 
  #24  
Old 03-14-12, 06:59 AM
capman1's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Installed! No more Leak! Circulating water without a hitch!

A big thanks goes out to Njtrooper, PeterNH and all the others who helped.

Matt

 
  #25  
Old 03-14-12, 04:33 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Great! glad that worked out for ya. AND you'll be saving a little electric to boot!

I've done the same thing with certain items... price 'em out on line, only to find out that even with the sales tax, Lowes or HD are cheaper in the end.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: