Switch to indirect hot water system

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Old 03-22-12, 07:02 AM
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Switch to indirect hot water system

So I have just about given up on the domestic coil our boiler has right now. After losing hot water a few times a week, have come to the conclusion that the coil just cant keep up, its 10 or 11 years old and am not thinking that replacing the coil is the way to go.

I was thinking of an indirect system off the fired well mclain gold boiler with beckek burner. Does this sound like the best method or any other suggestions would.

I was giving a high level estimate of about 2800 just over the phone without him seeing it which would be for install and tank parts, etc. Said the tank and coil they use is all stainless and has a lifetime warrany. Does this price sound right?

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-22-12, 11:49 AM
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The IWH will supply you with much needed hot water at a reduced cost providing the boiler is changed to cold start. It may require a coil plate gasket change to avoid leaks when the boiler cools. Can't say much about pricing.
Did the HW coil supply the proper amount of hot water previously?
 
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Old 03-22-12, 01:52 PM
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Got another price of 1500 to 1800 for the install so that seems more reasonable. He also mentioned that stainless isnt always the best way to go depending on your water and a water test is needed to determine the best tank material to use which will be performed.

Yes the coil did provide enough when it was new...when one person showered at a time. If two then no.

Thanks.
 
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Old 03-22-12, 03:27 PM
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Yeah, 2800 is kinda high... and since that was an over the phone, sight unseen price, I can only surmise that he didn't want the job and was blowin' ya off.

If there is a high chloride content in your water it will turn stainless to swiss cheese pretty quickly.

Check out the 'stone lined' tanks... Burnham, et al.
 
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Old 03-22-12, 04:25 PM
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Even if you decide not to change to a cold-start boiler setup, IMO installing an indirect HW tank would be well worth the investment, just based on increased comfort alone. You'll be wondering how you ever got along with that wimpy internal coil.
 
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Old 03-24-12, 06:16 AM
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I have that same set up and it does supply a good amount of water. The only problem I have with it is that every year or 2 I have to clean the coil. Not the inside , but the outside. My boiler is a closed system with antifreeze, but I have a bunch a sediment that builds on the outside of the coil and slows recovery time down big time. With unions installed it is a couple hour job. Next time I do it I will put an inline filter right before the tank and hopefully that will help
 
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Old 03-24-12, 08:00 PM
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hammerdown22,
Do you have oil or gas?

Peter
 
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Old 03-28-12, 07:28 AM
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Its an oil burner.

I have found someone good to do the job and he recommends two diff tanks, either one he says is great and should last a long time, and each has there own benefit and downside over the other.

Tank 1 is a Vaughn Top Performer Plus 35 gallon, stone lined, no anode rod. Has a gasket so the coil can be removed but since has a gasket can leak.

Tank 2 is Buderus S120 32 gallon tank. Anode rode all welded shut.

Any opinions on which is better?

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 03-28-12, 08:17 AM
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Hello,
The reason i asked about oil, is because around here electricity is 14-15 cents a kilowatt.
It is less costly in the warm weather, say mid May to mid October, to make small to moderate amounts of hot water with electic than oil, due to boiler standby losses etc.
How much is electricity where you are ?
How much hot water do you use a day?

Vaughn tanks have a good reputation and are known to be reliable. I wouldn't worry about the gasket.
IMO i'd take the stone lined over the Buderus.

If the Buderus was the stainless steel model, ok.
I've had good luck with my 20 year old stainless steel Super-Stor.

Peter
 
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Old 03-28-12, 09:04 AM
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I've read that people complain that the Vaughn hydrastone lining is causing musty smelly water?

The buderus is the logalux s120. Says thermoglase coating on interior with a magnesium anode rod so the water attacks teh rod. He seemed to lean towards this one but said they both are good, reliable, and should get a good 20 years out of either one.

Thanks again
 
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Old 03-28-12, 11:08 AM
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Check into a Super Stor

Peter
 
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Old 03-28-12, 02:36 PM
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Compare tank size, first hour ratings, boiler size required, ft head, gpm flow for pump sizing and stone lined tanks will normally give you better recovery and higher recovery.
 
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