Steam boiler install critique

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Old 04-05-12, 08:20 PM
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Steam boiler install critique

Hi all,

I just got a new steam boiler installed, and was wondering if you could provide a critique of the installation. Does anything look out of place? Does anything look particularly good? Based on what you see, should I consider hiring this plumber again?

Note: it's important that you know that the galvanized pipes and everything above (insulation, vents) was already there. The shiny black iron, auto-water filler, the boiler and the electric are all new.

Thanks in advance

 
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Old 04-05-12, 10:26 PM
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Sure it looks good by the pic, but you really cant tell a darn thing. Looks need.

Did you like the guy?

Did he do what he said he was going to do?

Neat, friendly?

I would be more incline to know if he sized the boiler properly. Most likely he did. Sizing steam I believe goes by the amount of radiation you have. 100,000 btu of rads then 100,000 btu boiler.

The steam pros will chime in.

Oh whats that flue pipe going from chimney to the wall there?


Mike NJ
 
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Old 04-06-12, 11:50 AM
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From an attitude standpoint, the gentlemen and his crew were 10/10. A pleasure to do business with.

The angle in the picture doesn't help, but the flue on the left goes to another boiler. If you pay real close attention, you'll notice the wall is actually just fencing that separates the two units in the building.

In terms of sizing the boiler, I'm glad I did my homework because the initial proposal was for a 5-section, whereas I measured/calculated 3.5 or 4 would do it. So we installed a 4-section and it works great.

One install question I have: the water fill pipe is connected directly to the water supply. Although I realize the boiler isn't under pressure (maybe 1psi), I was wondering if there should be a check valve to prevent boiler water from going back into the water supply, if we were to turn off or drain the water supply for other maintenance.
 
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Old 04-12-12, 03:50 PM
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The steam boiler

Looks like a good job. He used black pipe for the steam, and the returns, he installed a hartford loop, a lot of guys use copper to do that job nowadays.
Sid
 
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Old 04-12-12, 06:07 PM
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I see what may be an issue or an optical illusion. On the returns it looks like the tee where they connect together is above the water level. The tee should be lower than the water level to make a water seal between the two returns.
Remember to keep the water level between 28" & 29" from the floor. Good idea to put a mark on the glass tube.
Don't forget to insulate all the steam carrying mains.
The vents are not in the right place but that is where they were. It would be best to get them higher on a pipe nipple. Were they replaced? Do they work well and are they fast enough. An effcienct steam system is all about near boiler piping, insulation and venting.
For FAQ's on steam systems see this link.
Technical Menu
and click FAQ on the top right column.
 
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Old 04-13-12, 12:04 PM
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RBeck,

Good observation on the water level versus the T. Just to be sure, are you talking about the black iron pipes near the boiler or the galvanized pipes on the far left? I don't think the galvanized T is water-sealed.

Unfortunately the vents weren't moved (harder) nor replaced (easier). The system seems to vent property, and I could always replace them with "faster" vents if needed.

Thanks
 
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Old 04-15-12, 04:36 PM
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The ones on the far left should be below the waster level. If one side vents faster than the other steam could end up going up the other return. It may be hard to remember but were these tees below theold water level?
The vents should be back a minimum of 6" from the end of the main.
Don't forget the insulation and remember the water level. The autofeed is for emergency use only.
 
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