oil to gas conversion of weil


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Old 04-09-12, 10:27 AM
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oil to gas conversion of weil

I have a weil mclain oil boiler model P-WGO-4 fired by oil. I just found out we have gas on our street and would like to convert my boiler to gas fired. Can I do it and if so whose gun would be best for this unit along with approx. cost of parts and installation.

Thank you
 
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Old 04-10-12, 01:10 PM
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Probably not cost effective. Back some thirty-plus years ago you could lease a conversion burner from most gas utilities for something like $3.95 a month or just buy the burner for around $100-150. Today the price for a conversion burner is over $600. Gas conversions will NOT meet the same energy specifications as will a boiler designed for gas from the get-go. Further, a conversion burner may not even be allowable under your LOCAL codes and requirements.

What with the conversion burner, piping the gas into the house, permits and inspections and everything you may be looking at a cost in excess of $1,000 before saving a dime on lower fuel costs.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 05:20 PM
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Best to call Weil McLain, and get their suggestions. An alternative is to replace the boiler with one designed for gas. At today's gas prices, that's what I would probably do.
 
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Old 04-11-12, 04:40 AM
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aside from the question of IF you can do a conversion legally, begs the question of why.
Conversion burners where never very efficient, nor where the older boilers.
The block for an oil boiler and that of it's NG counterpart are 2 very different beasts. (at least in the residential world).
Take advantage of today's condensing and modulating options, you will never look back.
The cost to upgrade will pay back very quickly compared to oil.
 
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Old 04-12-12, 05:27 PM
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If planning a replacement don't rule out a new cast iron gas boilers. The world does not always revolve around mod/cons. The operating cost is not that much different with todays equipment. Remember higher water temps lowers efficiency and cast iron has more than 8 to 15 times the thermal transfer of cast aluminum and stainless steel. In fact cast aluminum is about 8 times the thermal transfer of stainless steel. The important things are proper sizing, proper piping, outdoor reset and not too many zones.
It's funny how the rebates went away and the sales of mod/cons in the US went down and the cast iron sales went up. As Siggy wrote in an article titled something like "When Gray is Green" talking about with improved controls and iron section design the cast iron boiler may come back and be a better choice.
 
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Old 04-12-12, 07:28 PM
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As Siggy wrote in an article titled something like "When Gray is Green" talking about with improved controls and iron section design the cast iron boiler may come back and be a better choice.
Good article. It raises some valid points in defense of cast iron boilers.

Why Gray Is Green - Column - Plumbing and Mechanical

I've also read about mod-cons requiring (in general) more maintenance and generating higher repair bills. This on top of the higher acquisition and installation costs. And then there are the stories about mod-cons that don't actually achieve the claimed higher efficiency, for whatever reason.
 
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Old 04-12-12, 09:31 PM
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Although it has been only three days I have a feeling that edsperfect is a one-post wonder.

C'mon Ed, make a fool out of me.
 
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Old 12-11-12, 09:03 PM
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I have the same boiler and the same question

The service guy FROM MY OIL DELIVERY COMPANY comes up stairs and says "you have a prime boiler for converting to gas and basically tells me I'd have to be crazy not to convert since i have the gas already in the house and the pipe is about 6' away from the boiler.

I asked him why a guy who is employed by my oil company would suggest this, he said people are converting anyway and they want to be the ones to get the work.
His ball park estimate was +- $2300 all in to convert, and suggested that i would save about $800 a month during heating season. At that rate it would pay for itself in one season.
The house is a small cape in CT. 1400 sq ft. two zones. one upstairs/one downstairs.

I told him to have it written up and I'd think about it.

What am I missing here?
 
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Old 12-12-12, 04:47 AM
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I would never arque the merits / evils of modcons v/s the merits / evils of CI boilers.
I only say this, there are many municipalities that are in the process of making legislation to have min. eff. from heating equiptment.
We have already seen forced air gas and oil go to min eff. now.
The Ontario Building Code has just implemented min eff. for the completed house.
The world is changing, mod cons have had a decade to evolve and they have.
As a corporation, I will not install CI boilers. The TSSA has made it clear that they discourage these boilers from a safety issues. Too many CO deaths caused by poorly maintainted boilers.

I think almost any system can be adapted to a mod con so as to provide proper condensing operation.

I quess I would look at it this way, with todays increased technology in the automotive sector thats pushing fuel economy up and up... would you go out and buy a low tech carbuerated car to save a few thousand ???
I sure hope not.

Just my 2 cents
 
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Old 12-12-12, 05:46 AM
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...His ball park estimate was +- $2300 all in to convert, and suggested that i would save about $800 a month during heating season. At that rate it would pay for itself in one season.

How old is the boiler? Keep in mind that an oil-gas conversion will probably render any remaining warranty null and void.

Converting to gas will surely save you money, but that $800/mo savings estimate seems a bit high to me, even in the winter. Everything else being equal, it'll probably take more like 2-3 years to recoup your investment, which isn't bad at all, either.

How is your hot water (for use in the home) made? Stand-alone tank? If so, is there piping connecting the tank to the boiler? Converting to gas might allow you to run the boiler as a "cold-start" (as long as you have a separate tank for making hot water) which could save you some more money on that basis.
 
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Old 12-12-12, 06:05 AM
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TO, I think perhaps your reply was to the OLD part of this thread? Just in case anyone was confused about that... ( like me! )

You are told you can SAVE $800 A MONTH ?

That implies to me that you are now spending about $8000 ( yes, thousand ) a month on your current oil fired system...

ReallY?

I could possibly see a gas conversion possibly saving MAYBE 20% ... even so, that implies that you are spending $4000 a month for oil...

NO WAY... I CALL BS !
 
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Old 12-12-12, 06:07 AM
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The Boiler is 3, maybe 4 years old. Hot water is from a stand alone gas fired 80 gallon water heater.
not sure what you mean by cold start.

i didnt know there were safety issues with cast iron boilers? why is that?

thanks,
 
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Old 12-12-12, 06:10 AM
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he guessed that i'm spending 900/month on oil, and that i'd spend $80/month on gas. that sounded crazy to me too.
 
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Old 12-12-12, 10:09 AM
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If you are spending 900 a month on oil, something is terribly wrong.

You said he 'guessed' that... he delivers your oil, how come he had to 'guess' ?

Yeah buddy, he thinks you've got fish lips and is trying to sink a hook.
 
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Old 12-12-12, 10:13 AM
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he was just the service tech, so that was his guess. I'd better figure out how much oil I'm burning X cost etc to get an accurate picture here. sorry guys - i should have done this homework before coming here. This guy made it sound like it was such a no-brainer - I figured if you all here agreed it would be an easy decision.
like Arnold said - I'll be back...when i have more details. thx
 
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Old 12-12-12, 04:49 PM
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should have done this homework before coming here.
Naaah, we don't mind homework helping!

Let me ask though, how long have you lived in the home? Do YOU have a history of how much fuel you've purchased?

A 1400 sq ft home MIGHT use $600 worth of oil in a month... but ONLY IF it was January/February AND the temperature never rose above 10F for that entire month and with a window open the whole time.

My home, 1900 sq ft, has burned about 100 gallons so far this heating season. Granted, it's not been really cold yet, but still... $900 a month? C'mon, how blatant do his shark fins have to be?

I would have been tempted to push him down the stairs... on the other hand, I might have acted really stupid and wasted a whole bunch of his time asking every dumbazz question in the book... he would have been there half the day just playing MY game!
 
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Old 12-12-12, 05:01 PM
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By the way, if you are going to spend any money on the home, especially with an almost NEW boiler already installed, the FIRST thing you should do is look at improving the heat loss of the home by insulating... and then insulating some more...

Your attic should be upgraded to at LEAST R40 and the walls as much as you can get in there.

After that, work on AIR INFILTRATION issues. Air infiltration is often the GREATER of the heat losses, and often the CHEAPER to remedy.

You want to spend a couple hundred on a good cause? Find a reliable energy audit company and have them do a comprehensive audit INCLUDING what they call a 'blower door test'. This audit will identify the areas you need to address to save energy.

NOTE: New windows and doors are the LEAST cost effective way to save energy! They will RARELY pay for themselves in energy savings in ten or more years... don't let slick salesmen fool you, even if they DO dress like yer Grandma. "...oh my Grandma, what big teeth you have!..."
 
 

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