"Lazy" Taco Pump Motor

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Old 05-01-12, 03:27 PM
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"Lazy" Taco Pump Motor

I have a spare Taco 100 pump assembly lying around that I finally got to checking out. I separated the motor (GE 1/12 HP) from the rest of the assembly and hooked up some power. The motor will hum but not start spinning on it's own. If I give the shaft just a little helpful twist the pump will kick on and thereafter the shaft seems to spin freely and the motor runs quietly. It shuts down normally when I disconnect power. I've tried spraying a little penetrating oil in areas I thought might help free up the shaft, but I get the feeling that the shaft is not the problem.

Is this pump motor fixable?
 
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Old 05-01-12, 04:08 PM
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i think you can swap the motors. that's a bigger pump than your typical 00 series. check new pump vs. individual parts pricing, if they are close in price, buy a brand new pump
 
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Old 05-01-12, 05:06 PM
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The spare pump is a "drop in" replacement for a Taco 100 pump that is currently in use. The reason I kept it as a spare is because I wanted a quick and easy fix if the current pump breaks down. I've seen new Taco 100 pump motors (just the motor, not the entire assembly) in the $200-$300 range. I would prefer free.
 
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Old 05-01-12, 05:29 PM
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a 1/8 HP motor is ~$123. Is the motor sealed or can you open it up to expose the windings, if so, dip it in some kind of electro-clean solution or spray contact cleaner, bake it out in an or with a heat lamp (you know, the kind that older bro used for his closet mary j science project). This is typically done on large 3-phase motor stators & rotors, as long as the windings aren't bad.
 
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Old 05-01-12, 06:51 PM
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I believe the motor can be opened up. If I can get it apart I will take your advice. Thanks for the tip.
 
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Old 05-01-12, 07:15 PM
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There is a centrifugal 'start switch' in those motors. When the motor is stopped, this centrifugal switch makes contact and connects the 'start winding' to the AC power. As soon as the motor spins up to speed, the weights on the switch fly out and open the contact to the start winding to take it out of the circuit. This is the characteristic 'click' that one hears a second or two after powering these motors.

Is there a capacitor inside the end bell of the motor? That could also be the problem.

You could have a bad start switch, or possibly an open start winding on the motor.

When you start the motor manually, can you hear the switch 'click' when the motor comes up to speed?

See if this article helps explain:

Resistance-Start Induction-Run Motor | HVAC Troubleshooting Guides
 
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Old 05-02-12, 05:49 AM
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Fixed!

Last night I read over the link NJ Trooper provided in his post, and that led me to another link from the same site:

Testing The Stator Winding | HVAC Troubleshooting Guides

At the end of the article, it talked about a situation where "the motor will not start, but will run if the shaft is turned by hand. The motor will produce a humming sound but will not turn when power is first applied to it. The shaft can be turned in either direction by hand and the motor will continue to run in that direction", which is exactly what I was experiencing with my pump.

So I woke up early this morning and took the pump motor apart lhoping to test it, and sure enough, I discovered one of the wires to the small electrical "board" was pinched against a piece of metal, piercing the the wire insulation where it touched the metal. All the other wires looked fine. I simply pried the damaged wire away from the metal a little bit with the end of a screwdriver and repaired the pierced insulation with some brush-on liquid black tape. When I put it all back together and hooked up some power, the motor switched on properly and ran perfectly.

Thanks for your help Troop!
 
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