Replacing pressure regulator

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Old 06-13-12, 06:35 PM
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Replacing pressure regulator

I have a Fleetline F-Series furnace that has a leaking Watts 1156f pressure regulator. I was first thinking the system needs to be drained to replace the regulator but after inspecting the furnace and shut off valves I was wondering if it would be possible to close a few of them and only do a partial drain? I've attached a labeled photo. I was wondering if I could close valves 2 (cold water coming in), 3 (lines feeding 2 zone valves) and 4 (return feed) labeled in the photo to limit that to the area I would have to drain, do the replacement and than open those valves after I was finished?

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Old 06-13-12, 06:51 PM
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Yeah, that should work. First turn off the power to the boiler and let it cool to less than 100 degrees F. After closing the valves drain enough water from the boiler to bring the pressure down to zero. Have the new regulator all set to go and work fast and you shouldn't lose much water from the boiler. Turn on the cold water first and allow the boiler to re-pressurize and then open the other valves and turn on the power.
 
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Old 06-13-12, 06:55 PM
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Yes looks like that will do it.

Also I see a valve possibly going to the expansion tank, coming off the relief valve? Probably close that too.

Also close the cap on that air vent on top of the boiler.

Then looks like a boiler drain at the fill valve that can be opened to relieve the pressure.

Note: Possibly the oil guys will chime in, but no trouble with the draft? I am not sure about the ell coming right off the boiler for the vent.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 06-14-12, 03:02 PM
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Also close the cap on that air vent on top of the boiler.
Ummm... probably not... it will suck air in to allow the boiler to drain down, and when refilling it will allow the air in the boiler to escape as it refills.

While the system is depressurized, it would be a good time to also drain the expansion tank completely.

If you have any doubts about the boiler pressure/temp gauges accuracy, do that at the same time.

I am not sure about the ell coming right off the boiler for the vent.
Nothing can be done about it easily... but I think yer right... probably should be 12-18" of straight up pipe. But it is what it is I think. Unless turd wants to do some heavy masonry work and punch a new hole in the chimney higher up, he's stuck... constipated if you will.
 
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Old 06-14-12, 04:19 PM
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Ummm... probably not... it will suck air in to allow the boiler to drain down, and when refilling it will allow the air in the boiler to escape as it refills.
Hmmm... I was thinking why let air get into the boiler? I would think he is well isolated and keep some sort of vacuum so the water will not gush out the return. Just relieve the pressure from the drain at the fill valve.

Just my thinking.



Mike NJ


 
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Old 06-16-12, 09:02 AM
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Well... y'know, that be good thinking ackshully.

By just letting off the pressure, and preventing the boiler from sucking air as you say, and having the new one ready to quickly screw on there might be very little water lost.

Yeah, that's what to do.

BUT... when re-pressurizing, of course don't forget to open the cap again!
 
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Old 06-16-12, 07:15 PM
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Thanks for all the help guys. It went pretty smooth. The only issue now is that the drain spout for the boiler seems to have a slow drip so I'm still losing water.
 
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Old 06-16-12, 07:33 PM
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Get a boiler drain cap like this and it should hold you over until you replace it. Get it at most home stores.


image courtesy aqualineinc.com

Please replace valve when you can.


Mike NJ
 

Last edited by NJT; 06-17-12 at 07:31 AM. Reason: added image credits
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Old 06-17-12, 07:30 AM
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Look in the garden hose section for that brass cap, our local stores don't put them in the plumbing section.

One thing to note about this... if after you install the cap you notice that a little water is leaking from around the valve stem, tighten the 'packing gland nut' that is just below the handle. Don't 'Popeye' it tight, just snug it a little until the leak stops, probably less than an eighth of a turn or so.

This faucet isn't the same as yours, but the nut is in the same location.


image courtesy justanswer.com
 
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