Rsalvage


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Old 08-05-12, 10:38 AM
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Question Rsalvage

Some years ago I bought my latest home equipped with the following heating system:
Weil – Mc Lain WGO-4 Boiler with 1.25 GPH Burner Capacity
Beckett Burner AFG Ser.No. 960118-27947 with .75 – 1.25 GPH F3 Head
Sideshot Series Model SS1 power venter
Carlin Model 60200-02 Primary Control with Pre 10, TR 15, Post 10 times

While the boiler specs specify a 1.1 GPH 70B nozzle at 100 PSI I found an 0.85 GPH 75A nozzle running at 140 PSI. I have done many gas measurements and have adjusted the air to achieve ~87 to 88 % efficiency. Would you recommend trying to set up the manufactures operating specs and why? Also do you think the current setup is correct as to the flame fitting the fire box or would the manufactures specs be better?
 
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Old 08-05-12, 11:56 AM
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If indeed the burner is performing in high 80's regarding combustion efficiency, then you shouldn't change a thing. You won't be able to improve on those numbers with any other pump pressure/nozzle setup.

As long as the burner flame is not impinging on the fire box walls, you should be fine.

Keep in mind that an oil tech will occasionally raise the oil pump pressure in order to address certain issues, like for example, to counteract lower oil flow rates (due to higher viscosity) in colder conditions. (In a nutshell, higher pump pressures result in smaller oil droplets in the nozzle spray).

When the pump pressure is raised, the nozzle has to be "down-sized" accordingly in order to maintain the proper BTUs. Check out: Beckett Oil Burner Manual
 
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Old 08-06-12, 07:56 AM
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There's a more info on nozzles here also:

http://www.delavaninc.com/pdf/total_look.pdf

Just to add a little bit to what Rock said, it's the 'flow rate' of the nozzle that changes with the higher pressure setting. The flow rate is what ultimately determines the 'firing rate' of the boiler.

A 0.85 nozzle according to Delavan's chart at 140 PSI is about 1.02 GPH, which is not far off the spec for the firing rate of the boiler.

It is sometimes possible to 'down fire' a boiler that is too large and save a few bucks on oil. The thing to remember is that the combustion chamber is sized for the firing rate so one can't go too far.

Bottom line: If it's burning OK, then leave it be.

You said:

I have done many gas measurements
You've checked the CO, CO2 or O2, smoke number, draft, flue temp, etc? You have instruments?
 
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Old 08-06-12, 08:18 AM
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Rsalvage

Yes I have all of the tools and regulary check all of the parameters. I just wonder if the higher pressure effects pump life. I am seeing some gauge fluctuations or chatter.
 
 

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