How to replace my Beckett AFG series burner motor????

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-19-12, 12:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How to replace my Beckett AFG series burner motor????

Hello All,

Great site and resource!!! Thankyou All for this... I have been reading several threads and have found several useful tips and instructions...

I have an older (~20 year old) Beckett AFG series burner that's still in pretty good shape... Has been very reliable through the years, but recently started popping the intermittent primary control relay... Troubleshooting and recent replacement of ignition transformer, cadeye, and the controller has led me to the motor... I am quite confident that it is infact the motor as it passes the "give it a good rap" test when called upon and it sure enough starts up... Two questions...

1) Should I take it appart and give it a good cleaning, oiling and verify electrical contacts.... When the motor fires off, it runs very smoothly and sounds perfectly normal... This is why I ask... On the other hand, it is 20 years old, maybe I should just replace it and hope for another 20 years...

2) If I do replace it... Can anyone walk me through it? Is there a thread on the site that illustrates the process... and is it as straight forward as it seems?? Looks like 2 bolts and its out, but I don't want to take it appart only to have a half dozen parts fall out of it and not know how to put it back together again... I'm an electrical engineer and very mechanically inclined, so not too worried, but your expertice is very welcomed...

Please advise and thank you in advance... Vic
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-19-12, 03:58 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 3 Votes on 2 Posts
Hi Vic, welcome to the site...

If the motor is intermittently not starting, I would go ahead and replace it.

The new motor will be smaller and use less power being a PSC type motor, so there's an added bonus to replacing.

Please double check the number before ordering, but I believe this is the one you need.

Patriot Supply - 21444U

[late edit - that is NOT the motor for AFG, it is the motor for AFII. Correct motor for AFG below]

Patriot Supply - 21805U

I would also replace the coupler at the same time:

Patriot Supply - 2454

Goes without having to say, SHUT OFF THE POWER FIRST! (but you knew that!)

Disconnect the motor wires from the control.

Remove the two bolts and the motor and blower wheel and coupler should slide straight out the side of the housing.

You will need an long allen key to remove the blower from the old motor, do so.

Clean the blower wheel real well before reinstalling and be careful not to drop it or CUT yourself on sharp edges!

Installing the blower on the new motor requires a feeler gauge... I don't recall the spacing offhand and can't locate my AFG manual right now for some reason... maybe on the old computer... hopefully someone will chime in with the spacing.

The trickiest part is sliding the new motor / blower / coupler back in and engaging the "D" shaft onto the coupler.
 

Last edited by NJT; 12-10-12 at 05:31 PM.
  #3  
Old 09-19-12, 04:01 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 3 Votes on 2 Posts
Take a look here, looks like a 3/64 feeler gauge:

SOLVING RUMBLES AND PULSATIONS

Even though the article deals with combustion problems, there is a paragraph on the spacing, scroll down.
 
  #4  
Old 09-19-12, 10:27 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks NJ Trooper... Will tackle this weekend and report back with results... Much appreciated!!!!
 
  #5  
Old 09-22-12, 10:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks...

So, finally got around to replacing the motor on the Beckett AFG... Must say it was very straight forward... Biggest part of the job was cleaning all the soot and oily dust balls that accumulated in there... Everything went according to plan and sort of fun project... Especially the part where the burner fired right up and sounded great... Love the new motor, looks tiny compared to the beast that was there... The only tip I would provide is, in cleaning the squirrel cage... Dirty job but made easy by squirting it down with a good degreaser and scrub brush; hose it down after and blow it dry with shop vac blow port and it shines like new.

Special thanks to NJ Trooper for initial response and encouragement...

Next project will be to tackle a thorough cleaning and tune... Ie nozzle, filter, pump and chamber clean.... Any, posts on this task would be much appreciated!!! Best regards, Vic
 
  #6  
Old 09-22-12, 02:10 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 3 Votes on 2 Posts
Great! I knew you could do it! Even if there wasn't an op-amp, transistor, PWM, or whatever, in sight.

shines like new
And the factory balance is probably restored too!

The main thing about servicing the burner, etc, is that you really should do, or have done, combustion testing afterward. But we'll walk ya through it when yer ready. Oh, yer ready now?
 
  #7  
Old 09-23-12, 08:04 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well naturally u peaked my curiosity... Boiler was cleaned and tuned (supposedly) last January... I wasn't home at the time, so not sure how well it was done... But, no time like the present to learn how to properly do it and would love to know how and what is "combustion testing". Please point me in the right direction... Even if it doesn't need a cleaning, I'm assuming I can preform a combustion test at any time, yes?
 
  #8  
Old 09-23-12, 06:19 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 3 Votes on 2 Posts
Yes, combustion testing can be done at anytime, BUT.................

You need instruments.

It's not likely that your Tek scope, or your Fluke multimeter will fit the bill unfortunately!

What you need is a 'Smoke Spot Tester' Around $100 :


image courtesy bacharach-inc.com


A draft gauge. Around $300 :


image courtesy bacharach-inc.com


and a way to measure CO[SUP]2[/SUP] or O[SUP]2[/SUP]. Either gas can be measured, generally CO[SUP]2[/SUP] is used.

There are what is called a 'wet kit' (this pic shows both CO[SUP]2[/SUP] (red) and O[SUP]2[/SUP] (blue), you would only need one) Around $200 :



image courtesy bacharach-inc.com


or various manufacturers of electronic instruments. Around $1000 I think?:


image courtesy bacharach-inc.com


There are also very expensive electronic instrument which combine all of these functions.

These things show up on ebay and craigslist fairly often.

So, in order to do the testing yourself, you are talking about a fairly substantial outlay of cash.

Still game?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: