Need help with my old 2 pass boiler

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Old 10-29-12, 02:35 PM
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Need help with my old 2 pass boiler

I have a Repco TOS 130 130,000 Turboflame, two pass, steel tube boiler which has gotten down fired by my boiler techs sometime over the years. I don't have the manual, I am the original installer, don't recall if I had it to begin with. REPCO went away in the 80's and I have no idea if anyone took them over and if their designs are still being produced by another company. The unit is still in good shape otherwise I would not have bothered with it.

I'm trying to put it back to near the firing rate that the tag on the side says which is 1.10 GPH

I decided to get involved in maintenance of the boiler this year myself for various reasons I'm fairly knowledgeable but not an expert

What I did:
Cleaned it tubes and baffles were not overly sooty neither was the flue pipe.

Replaced the electrodes and set to factory specs

Replaced the combustion head (F3 Beckett, AF burner) was badly distorted and cracked looked like it got over heated at some point. Te bast tube is set , welded in pace and dues not extend into the combustion chamber. The amulet that surrounds it is intact and is flush with the combustion head.

Replaced the round cylinder part of the combustion chamber, the old one was disintegrated virtually nothing but crumbs. The chamber measures 8.5" ID by 18" long
the cylinder shape chamber opens into the back of the boiler there is a refractory on the rear wall of the boiler that I left a lone as it was in good condition.

What I tried:
I installed a 1.0 80A nozzle but it overheated the combustion head and blast tube
I suspect the fire is too big causing the issue. I tried a hollow nozzle because that is what I believe it had in it from the factory

The current nozzle is .75 70B which is way below the 1.10 rate.
It seem to run fine with the .75 installed but I believe I'm not getting the best out of it and using more fuel by not running at or near the design specs.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 10-29-12, 06:40 PM
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You need a combustion analyzer, and know how to use it, to adjust the burners -which is important, particularly after replacing the nozzles.
 
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Old 10-29-12, 06:49 PM
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Not trying to sound like a jerk here, but IMO, if you don't have access to the equipment needed to test such things as pump pressure and combustion efficiency, then you really shouldn't fiddle around with different nozzle sizes. Especially if your boiler is indeed a long-forgotten relic.

Remember, the burner has been adjusted with the current nozzle (size and brand) installed.

(Edit: Like gilmorrie said. )
 
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Old 11-20-12, 07:45 AM
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Thanks for the reply's

I realize that the proper way to do this is to use an analyzer which I don't have.
The guys who worked on it did their magic on it without the use of an analyzer.

I have since found an invoice from the company who serviced it who are no longer in business when it was younger.
The nozzle was a 1.10 80 ES not familiar with the "ES" as the current one is a Delvan .75 70B

So what I think is ES might equate solid like the "B" in Delvan.

My thought was to try to get it close ... by eye... just like everyone else who worked on it... The new chamber is a bit thicker than the old one on the ID so the chamber is 1/2" to 3/4" smaller in diameter.

My original thought was the fire is too long but now I think it might be more of an issue of not getting enough air to push the flame. They have a very small inspection window which is just a 1/2" nipple welded to the plate that the burner mounts to hard to make a judgement about much.

I may have to brake down and have a guy who knows what he is doing and actually uses test equipment to work on boilers. My past experience is that most of the guys who worked on this thing were unfamiliar with how to set up a tube boiler like the Repco. only one guy use equipment on it and he didn't seem to know what to make of the results so he went by eye...

I'm sure i'll insult a few people when I ask them.
 
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Old 11-20-12, 06:06 PM
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So what I think is ES might equate solid like the "B" in Delvan.
I believe that is correct.

Replaced the combustion head (F3 Beckett, AF burner)
Are you sure that's the correct head? Perhaps when it was downfired they replaced an F6 with the F3 ? They may also have changed the static plate... I doubt they went down low enough to use a 'low firing rate baffle'.

If not enough air moving the flame may be held too closely to the burner head...

I don't guess that you have a way to check DRAFT both at the breech and 'over fire', do you? That could be important here.

Search Google for your boiler model and the correct burner specs... if it originally had a Beckett burner, you should be able to find a chart on the Beckett website.
 
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Old 11-22-12, 06:04 AM
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Trooper

I don't believe the head was ever changed until I did it... I would have remembered something like that being changed out. F3 was what I found marked on the old head.

Draft:
I wish I did have a draft meter so I could get a reading over fire and breach as you suggest.

I went on the Beckett site and Repco is not listed in the database. It's an 80's boiler.
I seriously doubt that any of the burner parts were changed I would have remembered that . I recently changed the electrodes.
The only parts other than the filter, screen and nozzle that were changed were the motor and the ignition coil.

A tag on the boiler that says " Burner adjustment requires:
Adjusting for #1 or less smoke
Adjusting for -.02 W/C over fire
 
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Old 11-22-12, 08:43 AM
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I just googled around a bit to see if I could turn up anything... no joy.

I gotta say though, that some of those so-called "answer" websites are just plain SCARY with the stupid answers they give... there oughta be a law!

It just seems to me that the F3 head is a bit on the small side for that firing rate is why I'm a little dubious.

Have you checked the pump pressure? That's important too!

You know I'm sure, that the actual flow rate of any nozzle is dependent on the pump pressure, and that they are rated at 100PSI. MOST manufacturers run pumps at 140-180, even 200 PSI nowadays in order to get a finer droplet size and better combustion. There's a chart (and a formula if you like math) that will give you the flow rate of nozzle at different pressure.
 
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