tricks to eliminate air without adding fresh water? to keep an idiot busy turn..

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Old 12-13-12, 07:31 AM
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tricks to eliminate air without adding fresh water? to keep an idiot busy turn..

Even though the standard to bleeding a zone would be to put a bucket and attach a hose to the zone you want to bleed, close the other zones and open the return valve until you no longer see bubbles in the bucket.

Here's the pickle, introducing cold fresh water into the system will create bubbles over time as it is heated, and without air eliminators at each baseboard, it's kind of like that idiot card that says "to keep an idiot busy turn this card over" and on the other side it says "to keep and idiot busy turn the card over."


One trick I've heard to do is use the same bucket and hose set up, but instead of letting the fresh water flow in, you close off the fresh water feed and attach a hose with a hand held circulator pump instead. You attach the garden hose from the return line and stick it in a half full bucket of water. Then you stick a supply line to the circulator pump in the same bucket of water (place this hose lower in the bucket in comparison to the return from the zone). Attach the outlet side of the circulator pump to the garden hose fitting at the bottom of your boiler and turn it on. The pump will circulate the water and release the air in the top portion of the bucket, while the circulator sucks the water and feeds it to the system from the bottom of the bucket. Therefore your are using the water which is still hot and has already release the excess gas.

Other ideas?
 
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Old 12-13-12, 07:59 AM
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Better yet go to the store and buy distilled water and fill you system with that....

Dont make the mistake I made by injecting carbonated water in the system...





Ha, ha...All in fun...
 
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Old 12-13-12, 08:25 AM
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Your idea with the pony pump will work... I've not done it myself but have heard of it being done. Thing is of course that it's not 100% because as soon as the water is out and in the bucket it begins to absorb air again. Don't let the 'inlet' hose splash into the bucket, that will pick up more air, keep both hoses underwater.

(distilled water is only impurity free, it will still have air in it)

carbonated? how heck did that happen? oh, yer j/k ?
 
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Old 12-13-12, 03:16 PM
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"...with a hand held circulator pump..."
If by "circulator pump" you mean one similar to what circulates the water in the heating system it most definitely WON'T work unless you submerge the inlet to that pump in the bucket. Circulator pumps do not develop ANY suction pressure and simply cannot "lift" water from a lower level.
 
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Old 12-13-12, 03:24 PM
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Right... something like this probably would work though...


image courtesy downwindmarine.com
 
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Old 12-13-12, 03:30 PM
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Yes a simple transfer pump as troopers pic will work.

This is what I use to add antifreeze to boilers.

Same concept... From a bucket.

Yes I was joking about the distilled water... And carbonated...
 
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Old 12-13-12, 03:34 PM
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Yes, the Jabsco type (rubber impeller) would work but I have never seen a system where the amount of air entrained in the make-up water would cause a problem EXCEPT where there was absolutely no way for the air to be removed.
 
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Old 12-13-12, 03:48 PM
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Agree with that Furd.

Maybe something like this would need to be done for example in the middle of the heating season after some work was done and lots of air snuck in...

But on a routine basis, on a system properly configured with any pumps positioned to PUMP AWAY from the Point Of No Pressure Change ( PONPC, the point at which the expansion tank is connected to the system), and proper air removal equipment, there would be absolutely no need for this measure.

If a system were that troublesome, it would behoove the owner to make some piping configuration changes during the warmer, non-heating, months.
 
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