Buderus-powered hot water baseboard heat doesn't get very hot and warms up slow!

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  #41  
Old 12-24-12, 04:29 PM
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Was it a bad thing to make that baffle adjustment?
Bad in what sense?

It may not have been necessary.

Without a way to measure the flue gas temperature and determine if the baffles needed adjusting, there's no way to know if it was necessary.

It won't affect the way the boiler heats the home.

The downside is that the COMBUSTION efficiency may have dropped a point or two by doing so. This doesn't necessarily mean that you will even notice a change in fuel consumption because combustion efficiency is only loosely related to AFUE (annual fuel use efficiency).

Unless there was a demonstrated need to raise the flue gas temperature, it probably should not have been done.
 
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  #42  
Old 12-24-12, 06:21 PM
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So raising the stack temperature by adjusting the baffles doesn't affect how it heats the home? Does stack temperature have more to do with the efficiency of the combustion?

Take a look at these pictures which were taken only about a month after the boiler had been "cleaned". Is this normal? Looks quite dirty to me.

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o...382AF7E6A9.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o...3835CFE4EF.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o...38311718D1.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o...383A2F36BB.jpg
 
  #43  
Old 12-24-12, 06:57 PM
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So raising the stack temperature by adjusting the baffles doesn't affect how it heats the home?
Not that one would notice. If anything, there would be LESS heat into the home because by raising the stack temp, that heat that is now going up the chimney is not going into the water.

Does stack temperature have more to do with the efficiency of the combustion?
Yes, pretty much strictly combustion efficiency. To some small long term degree if one were to collect enough data and crunch the numbers, the difference in fuel usage MIGHT eventually come up out of the noise floor of the data...

The pics don't look too bad to me... at least it's not all black and sooty!

Your guy SAID he cleaned it, but if you weren't there watching, how would you know?

Maybe what you would need to do is buy some cleaning brushes and do it once yourself and then monitor from a KNOWN state forward... DO NOT USE A STANDARD SHOP VAC! YOU WILL HAVE A MESS ON YOUR HANDS IF YOU DO! I use pool cleaning hose to make long vacuum cleaner hoses and run the vac OUTDOORS. The vac I use is only for cleaning the boiler and I don't expect it to last more than a couple years at a time so I buy cheap ones and consider them disposable. EXPECT to change the filter bag at least once while you are cleaning.

If I get some time I'll open my boiler this week and snap a few pics myself to compare. It has 221 hours on it from new install this fall.
 
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Old 12-24-12, 07:14 PM
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Thanks, Trooper!

I did actually witness him start the cleaning. I work nearby and I went home to meet him as we just bought the house and it was our first cleaning, plus I had some general questions to ask him.

He had brush and was explaining that buderus boilers are coated with something special (silicone, teflon, something like that?) that helps make the soot easier to remove when cleaning. He went on to say that because of this, he had to use a special brush because a stainless steel one would scrape off this coating. I only had a few minutes away from work and I saw him start the process.

Frank
 
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Old 12-25-12, 08:35 AM
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buderus boilers are coated with something special (silicone, teflon, something like that?) that helps make the soot easier to remove when cleaning. He went on to say that because of this, he had to use a special brush because a stainless steel one would scrape off this coating.
The casting is of "high silicon cast iron" but to my knowledge, there's no "special coating". I remain open to hearing from others with more information on this, but I'm thinking B.S. at this point.

There a vid on youtube of a guy opening one up that has apparently been running for 3 years without a cleaning. Search for "Buderus boiler ease of acess". It's s short vid and ends just as he gets the door open, but you can see 3 years worth of buildup...

Another vid from same guy showing the cleaning... "Buderus boiler ease of cleaning" I LLH when he whipped out the toilet brush! BUT, it's a great idea!

PLEASE, if you do clean it yourself, WEAR A DECENT DUST MASK! Don't do as he do.

I personally don't think he did enough... I would have gotten it much cleaner than that!
 
  #46  
Old 12-31-12, 06:42 PM
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I've begun the process of planning on how to add more baseboard.

I have a couple of questions:

1. Is it true that I should only add baseboard to walls that are immediately inside the exterior walls of the house?

2. What is the best way to connect baseboard to pex piping? Currently, my baseboards are connected via a threaded elbow that is soddered to the baseboard and a female swivel adapter that is on the pex end is screwed onto the elbow. I think the advantage of this is that if I ever had to replace a baseboard, I could simply unscrew it. Is it ok to replicate this method?

Thanks,

Frank
 
  #47  
Old 01-01-13, 10:04 AM
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1. Is it true that I should only add baseboard to walls that are immediately inside the exterior walls of the house?
No, not necessarily... in new designs, that's where they are placed, but if you need additional heat somewhere and can't put them on an exterior wall, they will still produce heat wherever you place them.

2... Is it ok to replicate this method?
Sure, why not?
 
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