Garage Heating not working

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Old 12-30-12, 06:00 PM
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Garage Heating not working

Hello.

A year ago we hired a plumber to help us heat a newly renovated garage. The boiler was in an adjacent room, so he attached a pump to the boiler and ran flexible tubing through the wall and down into some baseboard heating. Here we are a year later in winter and the garage is still very cold. The pipes in the garage get hot to the touch, but far from hot enough to heat the room. We thought about calling him back but we have since learned that he moved and therefore will have to look for someone new. Before we do, I would like to have an idea of what went wrong. I've attached some pictures to give a better idea of my situation. If anyone can give me some wisdom I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank You

PS. What the Honeywell gray rectangular box for?
 
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Old 12-30-12, 06:15 PM
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Push the red button on the aquastat, and see if that helps. If so, what is it's setpoint?

Is the piping possibly frozen?
 
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Old 12-30-12, 08:19 PM
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The Honeywell control is most likely an 'auxiliary high limit' control.

I believe this question is not related to the garage heat problem though, just a curiosity question?

If your normal high limit control fails, the one you are looking at is a redundant backup.

--------------------------

How big is the garage? (square feet) How well insulated is it? Was a wooden subfloor built on top of the concrete slab? Was that subfloor insulated?

I presume that the overhead door was removed and an insulated wall built in it's place?

How many feet of baseboard was installed?
 
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Old 12-31-12, 01:54 PM
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gilmorrie:
The button used to pop out now and then, and the pump would then shut off. I would push the button and the system would come back on. Right now the button is stuck in the "on" position, which is fine with me.

The setting is At 250.

No, the pipes are not frozen.
 

Last edited by atoledo; 12-31-12 at 02:22 PM.
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Old 12-31-12, 02:29 PM
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NJ Trooper: There is no wooden subfloor built. There IS a well insulated wall in place of the garage door. The finished size of the garage is 17' x 9'. The drywall walls are well insulated from the concrete walls. The baseboard is 6' long.

Currently, we have a 1500-Watt Radiant Electric Portable Heater in the room. One of those cheapo models from Home Depot. After about two hours with it on, the room is comfortably warm. Just an FYI.
 
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Old 12-31-12, 03:19 PM
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You don't have enough baseboard installed.

9 X 17 is 150-ish square feet.

Let's ballpark and say that the heat loss in there is a bit on the higher side because of the uninsulated slab. Let's go with 35 BTU of heat loss per sq foot.

That's over 5000 BTU heat loss.

You have 6' of what looks like Slant-Fin 30. That's good for 550-600 BTU per lineal foot with 180 water. So, at BEST, you have maybe 3600 BTU trying to heat a room that requires 5000 BTU.

Even if we go with say 25 BTU/SQ FT, you still are short on heat output.

How is that baseboard tied into the rest of the system? Is it connected to an existing run? If so, WHERE in the run is it connected? At the beginning? or at the end? In other words, is it getting the hottest water right from the boiler, or is it getting the coolest water that is returning back to the boiler? or perhaps somewhere in between.

If it's on the end, drop the BTU/FT of baseboard down because if it's not getting 180 water, it won't put out the 550-600 I quoted, with 160 water, maybe 400 per ft. So you might only have 2400 BTU of heat available, roughly HALF of what is required. No WONDER the room is cold, eh?

1500 Watts of electric heat is equivalent to appx 5000 BTU so it makes sense that it heats the room up and provides a 'sanity check' to my ballpark heat loss figures.

After the 2 hours does the thermostat in the heater begins to cycle?

Is the existing baseboard on an exterior wall?

Is there room for at LEAST six more feet?
 
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Old 01-01-13, 09:16 AM
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NJ Trooper: Happy New Year!

Thanks for the explanation. Looks like you've summed up my problems quite nicely. The pump which feeds the baseboard gets its water directly from the boiler not from a return. The baseboard is not on an exterior wall and there is room for even more than 6 feet. I'll look into extending this.

Thanks again for you responses.
 
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Old 01-01-13, 01:54 PM
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OK, one last point/question...

The pump for that baseboard, it appears to be on the RETURN side of the boiler, which means it should be pumping FROM the baseboard TO the boiler.

If it is backwards, you will get the cooler return water into that baseboard which could further be a problem...

Can you tell us where the other pipe to that baseboard is coming from? Is it from the pipes out the TOP of the boiler?

Can you take a clear picture of the OTHER side of the pump so we can tell which way the water is flowing?
 
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