2 themostats one furnance..getting too hot !

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Old 01-08-13, 09:51 AM
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2 themostats one furnance..getting too hot !

In my 2 story home there are two thermostats, one located in the "stuido aparment" in the basement and one in the living room upstairs, we installed the one in the basement a few years. over the years we have allowed family down on their luck to stay there. The problem is when the thermostat downstiars is on the upstairs heats up too much..i currently have a friend who says its only set at 69 no higher but the upstairs feels like a furnace especially at night, we normally have it set between 68-69 upstairs since the second floor always seems to be cold, what can i do to regualte the temps so that we are not cooking upstairs and they are not frezzing in the basement?
 
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Old 01-08-13, 09:55 AM
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You'll need to give us more in formation.
Is this a hot water baseboard system ?
Do you have multiple circulator pumps or zone valves ?

If you take a few well lit pictures of your heating system we could go from there.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:16 AM
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i believe its a water baseboard..i dont believe i have pumps or valves..my uncle simply installed a separte thermostat into the basement apartment and connected it with the boiler
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:24 AM
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PJmax nailed all the main questions I would ask.

One thing to note, if the insulation between floors isn't so good, heat rises through the floor/ceiling.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:27 AM
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its a very old house and the insulation is awful
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:28 AM
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i believe its a water baseboard..i dont believe i have pumps or valves..my uncle simply installed a separte thermostat into the basement apartment and connected it with the boiler
Um... You might want to confirm this. Hotwater zones normally use valves or seporate pumps for each zone. When the t-stat in one zone calls for heat, the valve or pump for that zone opens or starts, moving hot water into that controlled area.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:43 AM
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I'm really not sure then...i will have to check everythign out when I get home and I'll post pics as PJmax suggested
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:47 AM
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If you only have the boiler and a one zone system.....you can't have two thermostats controlling the same boiler.
The way you have it set up now is whenever either calls for heat the entire building heats.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:49 AM
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If this is the case...and i will find out all you asked once i get back home...how do i fix it so it doesnt?
 
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Old 01-08-13, 10:53 AM
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It's very hard without seeing the house itself.

You would need to isolate the basement plumbing from the rest of the building.
You would need to add two zone valves so that each area would be controlled by it's own thermostat.

The hard part will be in getting to the basement plumbing. It needs to form a loop.....starting and ending at the boiler.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 07:26 PM
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I've posted 5 pics for the original poster.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 07:29 PM
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Pictures look good.

I see a circulator pump.
Are there one or two zones valves ?
 
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Old 01-08-13, 07:36 PM
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Uhhhhh... Iacevedo... ¿estás mal de la cabeza?

Is that a tank of propane fuel being stored on top of the boiler? Is that an aerosol can of something next to it? You trying to start a fire or kill someone?

Good Grief man! Get that stuff OFF THE TOP OF THE BOILER! A boiler should NEVER be used as a storage shelf or a workbench!

Keep that stuff FAR AWAY from the boiler!
 
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Old 01-09-13, 04:31 AM
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There are two of them one is in the photo with the gray tank and the other is in in the picture by itself
 
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Old 01-09-13, 04:35 AM
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I'm a lady NJ trooper and ill make sure to inform my husband to move all of his stuff off of there y no no esto mal de la cabeza
 
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Old 01-09-13, 05:00 AM
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You can not control a single heating source with two thermostats connected together.
As said, you need to physically create two separate heating zones.

The reason two thermostats will not work properly is that a heating thermostat uses heat anticipation to control cycling to maintain even temperatures.

In a standard thermostat there is a very small heating element built in that causes the thermostat to come on sooner than it would based on room temperature alone......(Some digital thermostats use running time history for anticipation.)
This prevents large temperature swings.
With two thermostats the furnace or boiler will tend to cycle too often causing it to overheat.

If remodeling your boiler piping is more than you care to do to fix this you could try to cut off the hot water to the basement suite and install electric baseboard heaters.
 
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Old 01-09-13, 07:47 AM
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Since you have two zone valves in place.....then the system was wired for it.

My original thought was a stuck zone valve but since it was working orginally....something must have happened to the wiring...possibly a short in control wiring.

Actually it could be a partially stuck open zone valve.
 
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Old 01-09-13, 08:12 AM
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I'm a lady, NJ trooper and ill make sure to inform my husband to move all of his stuff off of there y no no esto mal de la cabeza
OOPS! sorry! my bad! but you do know I'm just kiddin' about being crazy, right? And that I'm only concerned for everyone's safety!
 
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Old 01-09-13, 09:26 AM
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its ok. i was not offended
 
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