How to bleed air out of boiler?

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  #1  
Old 01-21-13, 01:09 PM
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How to bleed air out of boiler?

We need to bleed the air out of our radiators and found the following instructions online:

1. Shut off boiler and note water pressure
2. Locate self-feeding (auto-makeup) water valve
3. Open all valves that go to heating zones
4. Close all shutoff valves
5. Open auto-makeup valve and open spigot to return line to drain water
6. Don't let the pressure go above 25 PSI. Release makeup valve if this happens.

I have a bucket and hose to attach to the boiler but unfortunately, I'm not able to discern which valves are which and could use some guidance. Can anyone help me? I've included high res photos below. Thanks!

Front: photo-1 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Side: photo-2 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
 
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Old 01-21-13, 03:20 PM
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Hi Cat,

Before we get into this, tell us WHY you feel that you need to bleed air out... what are your symptoms?

There may be an easier way.

Those instructions are pretty much bird cage liner. WAY WAY too generalized to be of any use at all. I hope you didn't find them on this forum! (I don't want to know where you DID find them unless it was here.)

Going to look at pics now...
 
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Old 01-21-13, 03:30 PM
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If you do in fact need to 'purge' air from your system, referring to this photo:



You would be using valves D, F , and G...

But I want more info.

There's an old pump on top of the boiler, but I don't see a new pump anywhere else on the boiler. I presume that it is inside?

I need to be sure that the pipe with valves F and G is the RETURN water to the boiler. I'm almost certain that it is, but I want to know if this pipe leads to the circulator pump.

Is this a multi-family? (do I spy another boiler in the background?)

Do you OWN this home? or are you renting?
 
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Old 01-21-13, 03:41 PM
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Simple instructions for bleeding air from a "generic" system is a bit like wondering how to catch a fish. It all depends.

As Trooper indicated, we need to know your symptoms. Is just one part of your system airbound? Then let's focus our attention there. Here in late January, when did your problem first arise and what happened before? Hot-water systems operate under pressure, so there is no way for air to get in unless something irregular causes it.
 
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Old 01-21-13, 04:23 PM
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Judging by what can be seen in the photos...

BRAND NEW SpiroVent and expansion tank, and old pump on top of boiler. I'm thinking that perhaps there have been some attempts at solving a problem. Possibly unsuccessful to date?

Catman, I think perhaps the questions need to include:

When and why were these components replaced?

I suffer from 'misogaugeny'... I hate them lying, evil gauges on boilers with a passion. I campaign to educate ppl that they are not to be trusted... EVER.

If you have been having a continual problem with air in the system such that techs have told you, it's this, or it's that, and thrown money at the problem only to have it still not working properly, then...

Let me ask you this...

Has anyone VERIFIED that the gauge is reading properly?

Read this:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...ure-gauge.html

If your gauge has been lying to you, telling you that the pressure is fine, you could well be running with only a few PSI in the system and this would GREATLY affect the ability to rid the system of air.
 
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Old 01-23-13, 08:21 AM
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So, the reason we're thinking we need to bleed air out of the system is because we've been hearing water running through the heaters since we turned them on at the beginning of the season. In my bedroom it sounds like there's a creek flowing through it. We asked the landlord to do it and he said he did but we didn't notice any change, and honestly, getting him to do ANYTHING is like pulling teeth. Here's a photo of the inside of the boiler.

inside: photo-3 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
 
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Old 01-23-13, 09:25 AM
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Well...

as a renter, you must NOT be touching the heating system.

and we should not be advising you to do so.

You don't own it, and you are opening yourself to liability issues and other troubles if you do anything at all to the system.

It's a sad reality, but our advice has to be:

"Step away"

Apply whatever pressure you need in order to get your landlord to act.

It seems that he isn't TOTALLY negligent... there IS a brand new air scoop and expansion tank on the system, and it seems a new pump as well.

Don't touch that boiler, it's not yours!
 
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Old 01-24-13, 06:49 AM
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Siege, if you are looking for your postings, they have been moved to here:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...ml#post2061640
 
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