Steam radiator not getting hot

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Old 01-23-13, 11:01 AM
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Steam radiator not getting hot

Hi,
I have a one pipe steam system.
One radiator does not get hot/warm at all.
The pipe feeding the rad in the basement is hot for only about one foot from the main steam line.
I took of the steam valve from the side of the rad with the boiler on and still no change - no air came out.
The main inlet valve regulating steam in to the rad appears to opens and shut properly.
My guess is that there is a blockage the this valve and this is where I am thinking to look first.

Any ideas?

Thanks
Nick
 
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  #2  
Old 01-23-13, 01:36 PM
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The steam rad

You should be carefull when taking anything off of a steam system while it's running, tou could get burned really bad. The steam could rush into a radiator quite fast. Are all the other rads getting fully hot? Are you shure that rad valve is indeed open? You might be able to back off the packing nut on it to get a look see, with the system shut down of course. Or you might have to look elswhere. There should be about about 1 or two lbs on your pressure gauge when it has been steaming a while. You could try to open the drain valve [****] at the bottom of the guage glass. Dont force it if it doesn't open fairly easy. You could blow down [drain] the low water cut off valve/chamber, which you should do 3 or 4 times a year anyway, to get a clue if there is just the slightest steam pressure being generated. Do you have any water hammer noises going on? Maybe the pros will offer more advise, I probably missed a couple of things.
Sid
 
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Old 01-23-13, 01:58 PM
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Thanks Sid,
The inlet valve seems to open and shut - I can turn it to a stop each way and the Spindle goes up and down. But it may still be blocked.

All other rads are OK . Did not check pressure today but was ok last time I looked. I just drained the tank last week.
I'll try what you suggested. I think I'll wait a few days to shut it down - it's very cold here in NJ right now.
 
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Old 01-23-13, 04:44 PM
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Sid, don't some of those old steam valves have some kind of 'regulating orifice' in them?

I agree that something is plugged somewhere... finding out WHERE is the problem!
 
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Old 01-23-13, 05:33 PM
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It is possible that the disk has fallen off of the stem of the valve, I have seen it happen before. If you disconnect the radiator at the union,with the system off of course,you can look into the valve and see if the disk is raising and lowering along with the stem.
 
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Old 01-23-13, 07:23 PM
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Thanks guys,
Sounds like good advice. I'll get to that when it gets a bit warmer here in NJ and I can shut down the heat for a while. It wasn't much higher than 20 F today.

Nick
 
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Old 01-23-13, 08:29 PM
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If you disconnect the radiator at the union,with the system off of course
Keep in mind I don't know nuthin' about no steam no how...

But, isn't it possible to remove the guts of the valve from the top without disconnecting the radiator?
 
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Old 01-24-13, 06:57 AM
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The rad

Yes Trooper you can open up the supply valve without removing the rad, that's what I meant when I said to back out the packing gland, I should have said to open up the bonnet, a good summertine job. I have no knowledge of an orifice or bleeder or leakdown provision in a steam valve. We were always told to crack any steam valve under pressure when opening, to prevent water hammering, which can be very scarry. The writer should also check the level of that cold rad, and the piping leading up to it, but then there would probably be some water hammering. I'm interested in the answer to this post. Cold Rad.
Sid
 
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Old 01-24-13, 03:37 PM
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The writer should also check the level of that cold rad
Good point Sid...

The rad should lean ever so slightly toward the pipe connection, right?

A couple nickels under the feet will pitch it properly.
 
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Old 01-26-13, 06:23 AM
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The rad

Nick
Just for laughs, check the hole that you took the air vent out from. Not very likely but you never know. They usually have a little siphon device to help the water drain from them, and that would kinda clean the hole as it was unscrewed.
Just a thought. As always with the heat off.
Sid
 
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