Gas Boiler / Water Heater Recommendation?

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Old 03-09-13, 06:33 AM
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Gas Boiler / Water Heater Recommendation?

I am trying to prepare to convert to a Gas boiler with a water heater and I would like recommendations. My gas provider National Grid offers rebates on the Burnham ES2 and ESC gas boilers. Does anybody have any experience with either? Which boiler would be a better choice to go with? Also, I am tossed between getting a wall mounted Gas tankless hot water heater vs an indirect water heater. I'm reading that the indirect water heaters are the most efficient but the only problem I come across is space. The boiler "room" is 8ft high by 6ft wide and 42" deep. My current oil burner is 22inches wide and I know is taking up a lot of room. The burnham boilers are 15" wide so I save 7 inches. I believe I might be able to fit a 40-50 gallon indirect water tank but it will be tight. My main concern is to get hot water pressure everywhere in the house when the showers are running and to get enough hot water for both showers to be running at the same time and never have to worry about running out of hot water. (I apologize for not being able to put spaces but IE10 does not seem to be compatible with this site )
 
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Old 03-09-13, 06:49 AM
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National Grid offers rebates on the Burnham ES2 and ESC gas boilers.
yeah....whats the rebate???


Not a fan of the ES2/esc.... There is a post on it somewhere that I started. You need to line the chimney with them...


For the efficiency of only 85% I would go with like a series 2. Cheaper...... Even without the rebate. Plus the liner will add 1k or so to the price.


Whats your demand for HW????


Whats boiler is there now BTU wise? How big is the home?

Do a heat loss calculation. Most boilers are oversized. Read the stickys at the top of this forum.


 
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Old 03-09-13, 07:16 AM
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I can get the ES2 for $977 and the ESC for $1052. That's for the 105k BTU. I do not have a masonry chimney, I have a stainless steel chimney so it does not need to be lined.

As for the hot water I want to be able to have available hot water for 2 showers at once. Or if 1 shower is going and the dishwasher is running there will be available hot water.
 
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Old 03-09-13, 07:18 AM
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Very happy with our ESC through National Grid.

It's done a great job heating the place and required no service call backs. Just be sure it's sized properly and installed by the book.
 
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Old 03-09-13, 07:48 AM
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I can get the ES2 for $977 and the ESC for $1052.
Where you getting that??? I believe they list for $2800. Geez I would by them and resell them...


 
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Old 03-09-13, 08:18 AM
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I have a stainless steel chimney so it does not need to be lined.
If it's a 6" chimney, it may well be too large for a newer high efficiency boiler. You WILL have condensation issues, I am speaking from direct experience. The flue gas condensate will be POURING down that chimney.

I will be adding a smaller diameter liner to my existing 6" chimney as soon as the heating season is done, only to reduce the diameter and stop the condensation issues.

In fact, that 'so-called' leak that you said was repaired... I question the fact that it was a leak at all... it appears to me that your system probably has some condensation issues NOW.
 
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Old 03-09-13, 09:22 AM
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If it's a 6" chimney, it may well be too large for a newer high efficiency boiler. You WILL have condensation issues, I am speaking from direct experience. The flue gas condensate will be POURING down that chimney.

I will be adding a smaller diameter liner to my existing 6" chimney as soon as the heating season is done, only to reduce the diameter and stop the condensation issues.

In fact, that 'so-called' leak that you said was repaired... I question the fact that it was a leak at all... it appears to me that your system probably has some condensation issues NOW.
It's easy for me to replace the chimney with a new steel liner above is the attic so I can get in there really easy. Would it be better to go direct vent?
 
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Old 03-09-13, 02:14 PM
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It's easy for me to replace the chimney with a new steel liner above is the attic so I can get in there really easy. Would it be better to go direct vent?
Installing a LINER in the existing chimney would not be done from the attic, but from either the top down, or the bottom up. Might not be as easy as you think.

Direct vent is certainly an option, if there is a good place to vent through the wall... there's lots of areas that you CAN'T vent to... proximity to windows/doors, roof overhangs, etc, etc... if you consider direct vent, make sure you know first that you have a proper location for the vent.
 
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