Circulater Pump Replacement

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Old 03-17-13, 08:16 AM
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Circulater Pump Replacement

I have an in floor heating system and need to replace the pump. I cannot valve it off but the pump in the highest point in the system. Do i need to drain the system and boiler?
 
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Old 03-17-13, 08:48 AM
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Why are you having to replace pump? You certain that it's bad?

If the pump is at the highest point in the system, you only need to drain enough to relieve the pressure and drop the water level below that of the pump. The rule is never to drain more than you need to, that stinky old water in the system already has all of the O2 driven out of it. You don't want to start over with a full load of fresh water if you don't have to.
 
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Old 03-17-13, 03:15 PM
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Thank you. It is making a rattling noise and is not moving any fluid. It is at our cottage and when we came up for the weekend the GFI was popped. When I got power back to the units the pump was making a racket so I assume it is bad. Does it sound like it needs to be replaced to you?
 
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Old 03-17-13, 04:57 PM
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What's the make/model on the pump Harry? Is it a 'wet rotor' such as a Taco 007 ? or is it a 3 piece like the B&G series 100 ?

If the pump is making a racket, it would seem like it needs replaced, but if it's a 3 piece pump maybe it only needs a 'coupler' ? which is a heckuva lot easier and cheaper than the whole pump.

There is enough water in the system, yes? Hoping you didn't spring a leak and the water went low and burnt up the pump, cuz then you got another thing to figure out and fix after the pump is replaced.
 
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Old 03-18-13, 07:01 AM
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Grundfos. Type UPS 15-58-FC
P/N 59896341 P1
PC 0409

It is a closed system and is has antifreeze in it so i can see it is full
 
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Old 03-18-13, 08:41 AM
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If there's anti-freeze, that's another reason not to drain any more than you have to.

If you are lucky, there are valves on either side of the pump which you can close, then you would not have to drain anything at all!

The 15-58 is a 'wet rotor' design, not a 3 piece, so the coupler can't be the problem.
 
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Old 03-18-13, 09:01 AM
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THere is only a valve on the down stream side but the pump is on top of the tank and the highest point in the system. so i am thinking that i wont lose much. THere is also an intake to the water system so i can add some water. How do i knwo i have enough in there? There is a pressure guage located in the drain valve of the tank. should i have pressure in the system? PS this is very helpful. thanks
 
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Old 03-18-13, 12:31 PM
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Hi Harry, some things you've just mentioned lead me to want to ask more questions...

"Pump on top of the tank" ... " pressure gauge on the drain " ...

These things make me wonder what type of boiler this is, can you give us a make/model? Perhaps this is a 'water heater' that is being used for central heating?

In general, yes, closed heating systems are pressurized, usually to 12-15 PSI when the boiler is cold. Before advising about your pressure I would want to have a better idea of what you are working with.
 
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Old 03-19-13, 06:07 AM
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I had a new controller put in a couple years ago and i just talked to the guy who did the work. You are correct, it is a hot water tank being used as a boiler. It is pressurized and since i cannot valve off the pump we have to drain the tank, recover the antifreeze then pump it back in at pressure. I dont have the equipment to do it so i will have it repaired. This thread and your patience has been very helpful. Thank you.
 
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