Will This Work

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Old 03-21-13, 06:52 AM
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Will This Work

After the last power outage of 5 days, I'm going to convert my generator from Gasoline to propane. I have a 3/4" live feeding a TT solo 60 boiler, I want to know if I can also run a 16hp gen off that line too or am I going to have to upsize to a larger gas pipe, the boiler is using 13"WC pressure.
 
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Old 03-21-13, 07:57 AM
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Probably not.... How many feet from the tank? What else is on the line?

I probable would not even consider it. That 16hp engine and gen manufacturer probably suggests a separate 500 gallon tank min. Even with propane that gen will consume maybe 2.5 gallons an hour.

Whats make and model gen?

Whats this mean?

3/4" live
 
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Old 03-21-13, 11:48 AM
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This is like asking if a car will do 200 MPH. A corvette, ya maybe a hyundia... NO.
Point is there is not enough INFO.
First, 25 HP coverts to 63610 BTU per hour, but that does not factor any effec. into this.

First question, how many BTU will the generate want in order to run ?
Second, yes a 3/4" line... how long is it from the reg to the point where you will want to branch off.

We just do not have enough info to answer the questions... it's your toys you can do it by trial and error if you wish. You should have a manometer in order to know if both will operate according to what the man. wants to see
 
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Old 03-21-13, 02:13 PM
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As TO wrote, you need to supply much more information. The general rule of thumb is that for every horsepower of the engine you need 10,000 BTUs of gaseous fuel available to ensure full output. That would mean for your 16 horsepower generator you would need 160,000 BTUs available at the engine.

Add to this the 60,000 BTUs (maximum) needed by the boiler and you need a total of 220,000 BTUs supply. Standard charts state that a 3/4 inch pipe will carry 231,000 BTUs for 60 feet developed length at 11 inches water column of pressure. Developed length includes the flow restriction factor of any fittings and for 90 degree elbows figure a loss of about ten feet for every elbow.

Now this is all predicated on the tank piping and high pressure regulator having sufficient capacity in the first place.
 
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Old 03-21-13, 02:21 PM
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Thanks for the replies: I'm approx 30' from my propane tank there are 2 regulators one on the tank and one just before it the gas line enters the house from that reg. approx 12 ' to where I want to tap into the line, there is nothing else on the line but my 60K boiler, Im not sure how many btu's the generator will need as I haven't converted it yet. I do have a manometer I'll check the pressure with both items running.
 
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Old 03-21-13, 04:05 PM
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I don't know a whole lot about LPG... so beat me up if I'm wrong... but I think these points also need to be considered:

I believe that the surface area of the LP inside the tank has to be large enough to be able to 'boil' the LIQUID into a GAS at a rate fast enough for all appliances on the circuit... I think this is one reason that LPG tanks used for high output appliances are HORIZONTAL... more surface area inside the tank, and this in ADDITION to the size of the piping.

If the tank is above ground, outdoor temperature plays a part in the rate at which the LIQ turns to GAS as well. Below ground tank, if deep enough, is not as affected by outdoor temps.
 
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Old 03-21-13, 04:18 PM
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You're not wrong, Trooper and those are good points to remember. While uncommon with air-cooled engines, using a liquid feed LPG to a water heated vaporizer/zero governor is quite common on liquid-cooled engines. Some stationary installations will have a fired vaporizer to boil liquid LPG to gaseous state. These are definitely NOT DIY friendly.
 
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