One zone not producing heat


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Old 03-31-13, 08:31 PM
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One zone not producing heat

I have a two zone set-up and one of the zones (the original) has stop producing heat. There was noise coming from the circulator (Taco 007-F5) so I replaced it with the same circulator. That didn't do the trick. I purged the system of air (I think I got it all out) and this didn't help. Both circulators sit on the return line.

The pipe that exits the boiler is hot to the touch. It splits in two, but only one remains hot. I tried opening the flo-check valve more, but the pipe's temp doesn't change.

I'm concerned that the circulator for the zone not producing heat might be too close to the boiler, but the system has worked flawlessly for the last six years. The portion of the return pipe close to the boiler gets hot, but turns cool again at the five foot mark, hence my thinking here.

I attached a link to a Photobucket album that contains pictures of the heater for convenience.

Oil Burner Photos by scott-unlv | Photobucket

I appreciate any input you can provide.

Scott
 
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Old 04-01-13, 08:40 AM
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OMG I dont even know where to start.....

What is the PSI of the boiler? Read the temp and pressure gauge on the boiler.

Apparently you have a buffer tank....Can you get better pics of where the pumps are tied into, as well as the piping to and from the buffer tank?
 
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Old 04-01-13, 04:58 PM
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Apparently you have a buffer tank
That might be some sort of 'aqua booster' for the "thankless" domestic water coil ?

Scott, I believe that you still have air trapped in half the system...

I'll study the pics in more detail this evening and see if we can come up with something.
 
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Old 04-01-13, 06:03 PM
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lawrosa/NJ Trooper,

Thanks for your replies.

The PSI on the boiler is at 20. I also added more pictures to the Photobucket album.

I was under the impression that the tank was an expansion tank. No?

There is only one line leading into the tank (if that matters).

Thanks,
Scott
 
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Old 04-01-13, 06:29 PM
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Yes I see better now... It is an expansion tank. Not piped properly at all, but thats another topic. you probably want to switch to a bladder type and add a air vent at the port where the existing tank is attached.


Probably still have air in that line.

Open that flo control all the way when you bleed. You need to increase the psi in the boiler with the fill valve. Lift the handle while bleeding. Get it up to around 30 psi but not above or the relief valve will trip)

With your bleed station you are closing the stop right?

What type of heat emitters?

Additionally I use run the circ sometimes with troubled zones. It helps push the air out.


Lastly, why is there air? You may need to drain that expansion tank. But how it collects the air is beyond me.....
 
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Old 04-01-13, 07:34 PM
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Scott, I understand that you want to know how to get the air out... but I have to say that I can't really make much sense of what I'm looking at in the pics. I can't really tell what pipe is connected to what.

Can I ask a question? Did you do this? Reason I ask? I want to be careful I don't insult you.

Are you using these to purge the system with?



With your bleed station you are closing the stop right?
That pic is what Mike is referring to as a 'bleed station', I call them 'purge stations'.

Obviously the hose thread is where a hose goes and the valve to open and close the drain. But, the OTHER valve, to the right in the picture, is the one that Mike is referring to as the 'stop' [valve].

You probably need to CLOSE that stop valve in order to force the water to go through the zone rather than take the path of least resistance.

Wow... that is one messed up system... (sorry, had to say it)
 
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Old 04-01-13, 08:25 PM
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Wow... that is one messed up system... (sorry, had to say it)
OMG I dont even know where to start.....
I said it already.....but It probably looks worse then it is though. Those stops/purge stations are the worst though. Packing leaks...etc.... Old combo fittings just were not what they are today.

Same thing ( type stops) they used for shower valves.... Many a leaks I could tell you....
 
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Old 04-01-13, 08:29 PM
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Thanks to both of you for responding again.

I did not assemble the system, so no offense taken. A friend of mine, along with a HVAC person who works at a local high school, moved the system from my kitchen to its current location six years ago. It was pretty much set-up identically to the original location.

From your feedback, it seems that the guy assisting my friend should have know better than to set-up the system this way. It really hasn't run smoothly since the relocation. On a positive note, I can now do maintenance on the boiler, including tuning it up and changing the fuel lines. But I digress...

NJ Trooper, to answer your question (and lawrosa's) I am using the pictured valve to purge the system. However, I did not close the valve prior to doing so. I will try that and see if it works. If this doesn't work, I will try it using the circulators during the purging as lawrosa suggested. I will update you guys and let you know how it works out.

Slightly off topic. Does the system appear to have any major code violations? I ask because we plan to sell the house sometime in May. I do know that I need to add concrete board or sheet medal to the back wall. In your opinion, is there anything else?

Thanks,
Scott
 
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Old 04-02-13, 07:38 PM
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I drained eight 5-gallon buckets of water from the system and finally thought I got all of the air out of the system, but the flo-check valve is making a lot of noise. I assume this is from air.

What I did seemed to help a little as the dining room and two bedrooms now have heat. However, it tool a long time for the baseboards second bedroom warm up and the bathroom and kitchen still don't have heat.

Any other suggestions on what else I can do? Also, does anyone have a theory as to why air is in the system in the first place? It almost seems like I'm fighting an uphill battle.
 
 

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