Pipe size to boiler

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Old 04-16-13, 07:28 PM
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Pipe size to boiler

Hello,

I have a natural gas hot water boiler. I need to move the existing black steel gas pipe. Here's what is there now: 1/2" copper into the house and to the regulator. 3/4" pipe out of the regulator, which moves to 1 1/4" after six inches. Then the pipe T's, and a 3/4" pipe runs to the dryer, and a foot section of 3/4" pipe goes to the boiler. It then transitions to 1 1/4" pipe until the boiler, where it transitions to a section of 1" pipe and shortly to 3/4" into the boiler.

My questions: Can I replace the 1 1/4" and run the whole pipe at 3/4"? Why are there so many varying pipe sizes and transitions? I'd appreciate any help!

Thanks,
Tom
 
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Old 04-17-13, 04:31 AM
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we need to know the size of the boiler. the distance to the gas meter.
What is the size of the main coming from the meter ?
 
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Old 04-17-13, 07:30 PM
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The main from the meter is a 1/2" copper pipe. It's about 8' from the meter to the regulator, and 14' from the regulator to the boiler.

However, I can't find any specs showing the size of the boiler. Any idea where it might be located?

Thanks,
Tom
 
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Old 04-17-13, 07:55 PM
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there should be a rating plate somewhere.
Sounds like the main is undersized as it is.

Anyone inspect or tag the gaswork ?
 
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Old 04-18-13, 05:49 AM
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Why are there so many varying pipe sizes and transitions?
Sounds like a 'hack job' which 'grew' in place through many changes and many techs who really didn't (a) know what they were doing, or (b) care what they were doing.

I agree that if the main from the street is 1/2" it's probably undersized to begin with.
 
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Old 04-18-13, 10:02 AM
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That 1/2" will be higher pressure, which we don't do up here.
Now it's real hard to say what pressure it is.
I would get a real gas fitter in to check pressures and make sure stuff is sized right.
 
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Old 04-18-13, 12:19 PM
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The main from the meter is a 1/2" copper pipe. It's about 8' from the meter to the regulator, and 14' from the regulator to the boiler.
I'm confused. The line pressure regulator has to be located upstream of the gas meter.
 
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Old 04-18-13, 02:22 PM
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That's what I thought too Doug... and isn't the regulator usually also outdoors?

I second TO's suggestion about having a licensed gas fitter examine that system. It really does sound quite 'messy'. Gas leaks can be ... ummmm ... troublesome!
 
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Old 04-18-13, 03:14 PM
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... and isn't the regulator usually also outdoors?
Usually both the regulator and the meter are outdoors. The regulator has a vent which certainly needs to be outdoors. The regulator and meter are property of the gas company, and they will specify their installation. Just ahead of the regulator should be a shut-off valve, also property of the gas company, that can be closed with a crescent wrench and padlocked shut by the gas company or the fire department.

Everything downstream of the meter would be the responsibility of the customer.
 
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Old 04-18-13, 05:58 PM
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Thanks for the input. I took some pics tonight to give a visual.

As background, the house was built in 1931. About three years ago the city came in and moved the gas meter from inside the house to the outside (pic). At that time they cut the old steel pipe and ran a high pressure 1/2" copper pipe from the new meter that was outside to the inside. I may be wrong on my terms, but what I believe is the regulator is still inside the basement (pic). I have attached some photos, along with the specs from the boiler that I found when I pulled the front panel (pic).

Any thoughts? Thanks again.
Tom

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Old 04-18-13, 08:11 PM
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What the heck is that white stuff all over the ground? Don't you Minisodans know it's Spring? Nobody tole ya?

I don't know a ton about gas... but isn't that thing on the left side of the meter also a regulator?

The one inside sure looks like another regulator... what do the yellow labels say?

I don't think sawdust all around the boiler is a good idea... that stuff is flammable, no? Combustibles are too close to the boiler too... try to maintain at least 18" clearance to anything that will burn.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 05:07 AM
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not all regs are outdoors.
Not all regs vent
 
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Old 04-19-13, 07:43 AM
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not all regs are outdoors.
Not all regs vent
The line pressure regulator shown in the photo (with snow) is outdoors and has a vent.
 
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Old 04-19-13, 09:49 AM
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Can there be two regulators?

The one outside to drop to an 'intermediate' pressure, and then the one indoors to drop more to a pressure suitable for the appliances?
 
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Old 04-22-13, 04:59 AM
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Yes, there can be 2 regs.
It is common practice to bring high pressure to a building, then drop the pressure to say 5 psi or so. Then at the appliance you can put a reg to drop it to 7" WC.
NOT common is residential though.
I have learned you see all sorts of ways people do things in the field.
Perhaps at some point the building was propane, and the installer did not want to run a new main, so he used the existing copper and ran it at higher pressure to save the cost of the additional material and labour to do it the conventional way.
 
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