Tekmar 260 help for amateur

Reply

  #41  
Old 07-25-13, 04:36 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
You must be psychic because the indirect water heater is on channel 3.
No... well, maybe... but not this time!

Taco panels 'expect' the DHW to be on the far right channel. This is where it would have to be if one expected the priority to work. If not using priority it really doesn't matter which channel.

By the way, I still haven't looked at your boiler manual, but I'm 99.9% certain that you should have a barometric damper on your flue pipe.

Being new to your heating system, are you aware that oil fired systems should be serviced yearly? There are routine maintenance items that are required. Is there a 'hang tag' anywhere on or around the system with installer or service company name?
 
Sponsored Links
  #42  
Old 07-25-13, 04:48 PM
marriott's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm planning on making an appointment to have it "tuned up" in the next couple of weeks. What is the barometric damper needed for? It kinda looks like I need to chaulk around where the flue pipe connects to the chimney. I was the one who had the furnace installed after buying my house, so this will be it's first tune up. Do you know what, other than replacing that little oil filter thing, the inspector person does. Maybe I could just do it and save the $125.
 

Last edited by marriott; 07-25-13 at 05:14 PM.
  #43  
Old 07-27-13, 07:09 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Ya know, there's yet another 'deficiency' I think...

Those GREEN wires that are clipped off and left hanging should have been connected to GROUNDS, meaning the chassis of the equipments.
 
  #44  
Old 07-27-13, 07:39 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I highly recommend that you spend some time with the boiler manual. If it wasn't left for you it can be downloaded here:

G115 Boiler Manual

About the barometric damper:

After starting the burner, set breeching draft to -0.01 to -0.02 inches WC using a draft gauge. The overfire pressure can be positive. If necessary, install a barometric damper in the flue system to maintain the underpressure in the system or to meet code requirements. Always install the draft controller in vertical position. Use a draft gauge when making adjustments.
This is pretty much all Buderus has to say about the damper, but it is important.

In order for an oil burner to perform properly, there needs to exist the proper 'draft' through the combustion chamber and up the chimney. In the vast majority of cases, the natural chimney draft FAR exceeds what the boiler is designed for. In effect, the chimney is 'sucking' on the boiler flue like a mouth on a straw. This can ultimately lead to combustion problems.

The barometric damper is an adjustable weighted 'flapper' plate that will 'regulate' the draft through the boiler by opening up and allowing room air to flow up the chimney when the chimney draft exceeds the boiler spec. This flapper opening has the effect of keeping the draft through the boiler relatively constant. The higher the chimney draft, the more room air that is sucked in. The chimney draft can go as high as it wants to go, but the airflow through the boiler stays more or less the same.

The installers should have used the proper equipment (draft gauge) to determine if the damper was needed. (I'm sure that it is)

I'd take the odds and bet that they didn't even take a 'smoke spot' reading on the flue gas. If they adjusted anything at all, I bet they 'eyeballed' the flame and said something like... "That's a good 'sharp' flame!" or, "Ayuh, THAT's what the flame should 'look like' "

Modern oil burners must NOT be adjusted by eye. In order to properly adjust an oil burner, a MINIMUM of five pieces of data are needed.

1. DRAFT

2. SMOKE SPOT

3. CO[SUP]2[/SUP] or O[SUP]2[/SUP] content of the flue gas. (either can be used)

4. OIL PRESSURE AT THE BURNER.

5. FLUE GAS TEMPERATURE.

OPTIONAL but RECOMMENDED:

6. CO (Carbon Monoxide) content of the flue gas.

Here is another excerpt from the boiler manual:

6.6 Notes on commissioning the burner

Allow burner to operate for 15 to 20 minutes before performing a combustion test. Earlier combustion tests can lead to incorrect readings as a result of burning off the sealing rope. We recommend rechecking the burner after a few weeks of operation.

Incorrect burner adjustment can cause contamination of the boiler (e.g. soot), leading to low efficiency, high emissions, and a greater risk of service calls.
  • Always check combustion with the following instruments.
  • [*]
Required instruments:
CO2 measuring equipment
Draft measuring equipment
Oil pressure gauge
Stack thermometer
Smoke tester
  • Check the combustion chamber pressure at the test port.
  • [*]
You can gain some reassurance that these adjustments were made by the presence of a 1/4" hole punched in the flue pipe close to where it exits the back of the boiler. This would be where the tech inserted his test probes.

No hole to be found, no adjustments were made.
 
  #45  
Old 07-27-13, 07:45 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
It kinda looks like I need to chaulk around where the flue pipe connects to the chimney.
It doesn't look too bad really, but if you wanted to do anything with it you would use 'furnace cement'.

Now available in a convenient tube:

35509 - Hercules 35509 - 11 oz. Regular Body Furnace Cement (cartridge)
 
  #46  
Old 07-27-13, 07:58 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Do you know what, other than replacing that little oil filter thing, the inspector person does. Maybe I could just do it and save the $125.
There's more to it than that, much more.

The burner should be serviced. Includes NEW NOZZLE, checking oil pressure, adjusting electrodes, and afterward, properly adjusting combustion with proper INSTRUMENTS (as above).

The combustion chamber and heat exchanger should be brushed down and vacuumed of all the 'crud' that builds up inside.

System water pressure, and expansion tank air charge should be checked and adjusted if needed.

This isn't something I would think you should NOT try yourself... not that a homeowner can't educate himself and obtain the proper equipment and knowledge, but for a 'first-timer'... no probably not.

Honestly, service techs are not what they should be now-a-days... it is highly unlikely that you will get the service you should have for $125. They generally just don't know any better, and are forced by economics (and the boss) to spend as little time at each job as possible, ESPECIALLY at the beginning of a heating season! You will be better off to have the service done when they are NOT busy!

I would make a bunch of calls... explain to the service companies that you want your system serviced and EXPECT that it will be performed with combustion analysis instruments, and that you EXPECT to have WRITTEN OR PRINTED PROOF of the test results. If you have to pay a little more than $125, then so be it.

To all of you techs who KNOW what to do, and how to do it, and don't cut corners on oil burner service, I'm not talking about you... you know who you are.
 
  #47  
Old 07-28-13, 06:40 AM
marriott's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I was wondering about that green coated wire...Speaking of wires: I am about to attempt at connecing the themostat wire from the tekmar 3 and 4 terminals to the 403's zone 3, 1 and 2 terminals. I am assuming that I have to connect the existing wires that are already on the 403 to the ones I need to run from the tekmar. Can I take, for example, the 2 red wires, tie them up in awire nut with a short piece of red wire that I cut out from the thermostat wire that I bought and connect that short piece to terminal 1 on the 403. Repeat this procedure wit the white wires to their corresponding terminal and voila! done?
 
  #48  
Old 07-28-13, 10:24 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I don't understand what you are saying...

The two YELLOW wires from the zone valve are the motor wires. Those should be the ones under terminals 1 & 2 on the 403 panel.

The two RED wires from the zone valve are the endswitch wires and should NOT be connected to the 260 terminals 1 & 3.

I'm going back to look at your pics again, maybe that will help me understand... yes, I get it now, see following post.
 

Last edited by NJT; 07-28-13 at 10:42 AM.
  #49  
Old 07-28-13, 10:40 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Let's verify first...

The WHITE and RED wires on terminals 1 & 2 of the 403 panel are connected to the YELLOW wires on the zone valves.

The BLUE and GREEN wires on terminals 3 & 4 of the 403 panel are connected to the RED wires on the zone valves.

Is that correct? (should be...)

I'm not sure I see the need for more wire nuts... but yes, if I understand what you are saying, you could certainly do that... electricians sometimes call that a 'pigtail' connection.

What you are saying is that you will remove the RED wire from terminal 2 in the 403, and attach it to the new RED wire that is going to the 260, along with a short red 'pigtail' that you will put back into terminal 2 on the 403 panel... and the same with the white wire in terminal 1 of the 403. YES?

You could just twist the two reds together and insert them both into the terminal and forego the extra wire nut.

Don't allow your 'inner gorilla' to overtighten those screw terminals!
 
  #50  
Old 07-28-13, 11:31 AM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
When this is all done, when your water heater calls, you should see "DHW DEMAND" on the screen of the 260. Then if you push da buttonz to view "BOIL TARGET" it should say 180
 
  #51  
Old 07-30-13, 07:27 AM
marriott's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yeah, I got the white wire and red wire reversed in my head. I connected it all like you said, turned the power back on a a few minutes later the boiler fired up with the tekmar reading that the DHW had a demand for hot water!! I am so excited to have hot water anytime of day. Couldn't have done it without you NJT!!! Thanks again for all the time and energy you've spent walkine through this You're the best.
Kristin
 
  #52  
Old 07-30-13, 03:51 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Fantastic! I had faith in ya, glad you stuck with it to the end.

I wish I really was psychic and could be a 'remote viewer', but my Pineal Gland is out of order... it would have been SOOOO much easier if I could have been there. Still, in a way, it's fun (for me anyway!) to try and figure stuff out like this.

DO try and find a qualified oil burner technician to tune up and clean the boiler. This tech should have the necessary instruments to properly tune the burner. He should also have a draft gauge so that he can advise about adding the barometric damper.

Enjoy the rest of your summer in beautiful VT! (Barton, VT was home to MANY generations of my ancestors!) I love visiting there... maybe it's time for a road trip again.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: