Boiler Pump Motor Replacement

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Old 11-07-13, 06:54 AM
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Boiler Pump Motor Replacement

Hi everyone,

Earlier in the year, you all helped me clean my boiler and learn a bit more about it in the thread below:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...ur-boiler.html

Thank you for all of your help.


When I went to fire up the boiler this year, the pump motor had gone bad. I took it to the local rebuilder, and he confirmed that the windings are bad. I have rigged a temporary replacement with a used motor (1/4hp marathon electric motor that required me to bend the frame a bit since the new motor is smaller), but it' really not a proper repair.

I would like to avoid replacing the whole assembly (pump and motor) since I really don't want to drain the whole system during heating season.

Can anyone tell me if there is a motor that will fit this frame/ pump? If there is one, I'm guessing it's a B&G motor, but I have no idea how to cross reference my 60+ year old motor.

Pictures of the motor and pump are below. Specs are as follows:

Motor:
Wagner Electric Corporation
Frame: 57T
HP: 1/6
RPM: 1725
1 Phase
3.1 Amps
Type RB
Cont rating
Code: N
Rating: 40C
No: A4E
Model: SY3356 K3559

Pump:
Minneapolis Honeywell
M417A3K 1-M



Any help would be much appreciated. I'm happy to provide other dimensions, more pictures, etc.

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 11-07-13, 10:38 AM
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Pexsupply lists several B&G motors (a.k.a. "power packs"): Bell & Gossett Pump Parts - Replacement Pump Parts - Pump Parts - Bell & Gossett Parts - PexSupply.com
The cheapest I see is over $800, without the coupling. You would have to verify that the mounting dimensions match your pump.

I would replace your pump with a Taco wet-rotor pump, such as the 007, for less than $100. You will have to drain the system below the pump elevation, which you don't want to do, but still. While you're at it, add isolation valve on either side of the pump so next time you don't have to drain the system.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 10:58 AM
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There is tag on your bearing assembly with some info. to make sure the pump frames match up. it will say maybe 189120 etc.. gilmorrie is right. You can buy 3 pumps for the price of a motor. On the brighter side if your hellbent on changing the motor they have some on e-bay for cheap money. Type in CIRCULATOR MOTORS and you see your motor. Make sure your bearing assembly is the right number. There are different motors for dif. assembly's. Good luck
 
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Old 11-07-13, 12:32 PM
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One thing to caution...

Before ordering a new wet rotor, measure the 'flange to flange' dimension and compare to the new pump to make sure it will fit.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 12:43 PM
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measure the 'flange to flange' dimension
Yes, and match the nominal pipe size. The RPM probably won't match: your existing pump is rated 1725 rpm and a wet rotor pump will likely be a shade less than 3600 rpm, which is OK. The horsepower ratings won't likely match - 3-piece, dry rotor pumps typically are rated at higher hp than wet-rotor pumps of similar hydraulic performance.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 01:54 PM
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The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) long ago came up with standards for electric motors that include every dimension and mounting method. If you want to replace the motor all you need to know is that it is a 57T frame. Unfortunately, that frame size is not common so the cost will be high and the choices slim.

I would recommend replacing the entire pump with a wet-rotor model as the others have advocated.
 
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Old 11-08-13, 08:43 AM
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Thanks for the replies.

A few questions / comments:

Where can I find this tag with the numbers on the bearing assembly?

My ideal solution is to find a used motor on ebay, but I see no reference anywhere to the 57T frame, including in this NEMA chart:
http://www.grainger.com/tps/motors_n...onal_chart.pdf

Is there a chart that shows the dimensions of the 57T frame?


If not, I will do as advised with the Taco 007 or similar, however I will probably wait until heating season is over.

Here are some photos of my temporary repair. Reused the original frame, and the motor I got was close enough in size that I could make it work. For $60 and not having to drain the system, I'm pretty happy with it for one season.

Any concerns with my "non-traditional" repair?
 
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Old 11-08-13, 09:38 AM
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Any concerns with my "non-traditional" repair?
It looks like there may be some unusual, unsymmetrical forces applied to the rear bearing that could shorten its life?

What is you aversion to draining the system to replace the pump? Draining and purging shouldn't be that big a hassle?
 
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Old 11-08-13, 04:05 PM
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The bearing assembly is what you connected the motor frame to. It looks like there's a tag unberneath the oil cup. It should have the bearing assembly number on it.

The one I found on e-bay was a manufacturer rebuild for 126.00 w/ free shipping.
It's a 1/6 H.P. 1725 RPM and it's a B&G motor with it's own cradle. You just bolt it up to your assembly.

It might be worth a look and if you have any questions you can contact the seller. It sounds like it's a business and not just someone selling an old pump.

specialtyoilburnersupply is the seller.
 

Last edited by NJT; 11-08-13 at 04:36 PM.
  #10  
Old 11-09-13, 04:44 AM
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The biggest problem with your "make-do" fix would be coupling wear from misalignment. If you plan to install something else next spring/summer and simply do not want to take the system out of service now you should be able to keep going with what you have done.
 
 

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