Valliant Ga92-120 sp does it need a open base board pipe?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-07-13, 03:28 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Valliant Ga92-120 sp does it need a open base board pipe?

So i have a Valliant Ga92-120 sp boiler with zoned heating. My question is currently all the room have a valve on the pipe which are controlled by a thermostat. But the bathroom does not. so every time the boiler kicks on the bath room heat up. the bath room is 90+ degrees at some point while all the other thermostats ate set at 60* or less (was trying to figure out why the house was so hot turn them all down). Does one of the pipe must remain open at all time to have the water circulate so it doesn't turn into steam and blow up. or can I put a valve on it and add a thermostat and have it controlled. I have heard I can add it and cant but would like to know for sure. any help would help. We just bought this house and never had baseboard heating before.
 
  #2  
Old 11-07-13, 03:47 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
What type of 'heat emitters' are installed in the home? i.e. Fin-Tube baseboard? Cast Iron baseboard? Cast Iron radiators? Same as in the bathroom?

I'm all for a bathroom that's warmer than the rest of the house but 90+ is crazy hot!

Does one of the pipe must remain open at all time to have the water circulate so it doesn't turn into steam and blow up.
No, not at all. I'm guessing that the installers felt it wasn't necessary, and that it would be nice to have the bathroom warmer.

can I put a valve on it and add a thermostat and have it controlled.
You could... but what you may notice happening is that the boiler could potentially 'short cycle' if only the bathroom was calling for heat. This might never happen though... but it could.

Can you post some pictures of the installation? Show us the pipes and valves and such all around the boiler system.

You may be experiencing what is called 'ghost flow' or 'gravity flow' or 'thermosiphon', where water will circulate on it's own without a pump running. Happens because hot water is more buoyant than cool water. When boiler is hot, even without pump running, the hot water can 'float' up into the bathroom radiator and push the cold water down. Any heat that's left in the boiler continues to heat the bathroom.

There are a few possible solutions and we can better advise if we can see pictures.
 
  #3  
Old 11-08-13, 06:27 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I will try and get some pictures up. but I think it 'short cycling' already due to the water going into the bath room and cooling down and returning. But I have tub and fin model baseboards.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: