Help Boiler clanking and tripping out

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  #41  
Old 11-11-13, 02:24 PM
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Probably I missed it, but was a verification made that the boiler drain is in fact working? I mean could it be blocked or the boiler drain valve stuck somehow even though the handle turns? Don’t know if any of that is even possible. Just thinking out loud.


OK - I just read post 1 again, guess that does in fact say the boiler drain works.
 
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  #42  
Old 11-11-13, 04:23 PM
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I know that I had pressure on the filling hose because I had a Y fitting on it and I opened the empty side just to verify water was flowing.

I unhooked the drain from the faucet, turned the supply water to the boiler back on and let some water run through the system. I assume that would have the same effect as switching the two lines. Is it possible that the boiler has some sort of valve in it to prevent water from flowing through the drain? I am stumped as well because I do not know how the system can be bled other than the multiple vents on the baseboards.

I am getting good heat downstairs but the baseboards up stairs are all cold except for one that gets slightly warm. I was thinking about closing of one zone at a time and trying to bleed it at the baseboards. Thanks again for all the help and I guess I will figure it out eventually.
 
  #43  
Old 11-11-13, 04:34 PM
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I unhooked the drain from the faucet, turned the supply water to the boiler back on and let some water run through the system. I assume that would have the same effect as switching the two lines.
OK, and what happened? Did water come out the drain on the boiler then?

Is it possible that the boiler has some sort of valve in it to prevent water from flowing through the drain?
I don't think so... what would be the point of the drain then?

I was thinking about closing of one zone at a time and trying to bleed it at the baseboards.
Yes, do that.
 
  #44  
Old 11-11-13, 05:26 PM
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Just a thought. I see your system splits but you mentioned bleeders on the baseboards. Do you have a loop system or by chance a monoflo system where the water would only go one way. If it is a monoflo system you have to bleed each unit individually.
By trying to bleed from the basement you would only be running water through the mains.
 
  #45  
Old 11-11-13, 06:53 PM
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I am not sure which type I have. How can I tell the difference? When bleeding each baseboard individually which one do you start with? Not all my baseboards have bleeders. There is one bleeder in each room. Thanks again for trying to help me figure this mess out. I am new to boilers and I live in a 60 year old house that the previous owner had a unique way of doing everything.
 
  #46  
Old 11-11-13, 07:12 PM
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From your supply line to your baseboard heaters do they return to the same line they feed from or return to a different line. If it's the same line look for special tees where they feed or return or both. The will have arrows on them or some writing etc. They're special tees that only let the water go one way and force a portion of that water into the heater.
They'll be a little different design than a regular tee. You'll see the difference if you have them.
If you do that changes your bleeding procedure.
Start with the one farthest away and make sure you have plenty of pressure so your not always adding water. Every time you add water you introduce air into the system.
Start with about 25 lbs. and don't let it get below 20. When your done drain off remaining to 15lbs.
Good Luck.
 
  #47  
Old 11-12-13, 12:02 PM
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hi guys –

Don’t want to waste anybody’s time. Getting cold out there and we all need our systems up and running. But reading Ken’s posts 7 and 11 below makes it seem the valve with the blue handle is thought to be the “return” valve, but it seems when you look at the pictures and the sketch, the valve with the blue handle, which is in fact next to the drain and the air scoop, would be valve #6 in the sketch. Maybe it’s just me but the sketch says the valve next to the air scoop is #6. That valve has the blue handle in the picture. That’s not the return valve – is it?

Just wondering if valve #6 is not currently in a fully opened state? I didn’t see valve #6 mentioned in the discussion and so could it have been forgotten about? Then again there can be a good reason why it wasn’t mentioned, and I can be a few light years out in left field. LOL

post # 7

… I hooked a hose to the valve at the to pf the supply like and closed the return valve. I put the hose in a bucket and drained it till no air came out. It did seem like air kept getting in the system though…
post #11

… When I bled the system I used the hose connected on the other side of the boiler and turned the blue valve off next to the valve the hose is connected to…
 
  #48  
Old 11-12-13, 12:47 PM
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Z, don't worry about wasting anybody's time.
#6=supply
#5=z2
#4=z1
#3=return
#2=drain
#1=feed
If you're back feeding through the boiler you're going up through the return line.
You want #3 open, #4 open, #2 open, #5 closed, #6 closed, #1 closed.
You will feed water into the bottom of the boiler, up the return, through one of the zones and out of the drain on the supply. You must keep #6 closed so you get full pressure out of the drain after that valve.
When you do the other zone open #5 and close #4. #1 IS closed through this whole process.
If you decide to try and feed through the #2 close #3 and open #6.
Feed from #2 through #4 and out boiler drain. When you do #5 shut off #4.
Did you happen to check if you have a monoflo system.
 

Last edited by spott; 11-12-13 at 03:15 PM.
  #49  
Old 11-12-13, 02:13 PM
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I don't think there is a drain on the supply?

So instead of closing #6 you would close #3 and feed up the supply, through the zone, down the return and out the drain #2 that is on the fill pipe connected to the return above #3...

I'm still at my 'day job' and going from memory not looking at the diagram so I may be mistooken.
 
  #50  
Old 11-12-13, 03:19 PM
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I edited my post. You're right. It looked like the drain was after the air scoop. I see the diagram now. Thanks, he's got enough problems without adding to them
 
  #51  
Old 11-13-13, 10:28 AM
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Still Struggling

I really appreciate all the advice you all have offered and I hope to get it fixed this weekend. I have not messed with it during the week because it is working for the main level and I am scared i will break it. I am planning to try a few more things this weekend.

I am getting good heat on the main floor and zero heat on the second floor. On the second floor I can hear it gurgling like air is trapped in the lines. When I open the bleeders on the baseboards on the second level I get some air at times and no air other times. I think the air bubble and water is circulating.

I am planning to try closing valve 4 and bleeding at the baseboards then close valve 5 and bleed at the baseboards. I hope this work and please keep the suggestions coming.
 
  #52  
Old 11-13-13, 10:31 AM
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Thanks for the help. I have had all the valves open and closed many times. They are currently all open and it appears to be air trapped in the system that I can't get out on the second floor. Does the air normally rise to the highest point in the system?
 
  #53  
Old 11-13-13, 01:57 PM
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Does the air normally rise to the highest point in the system?
Well... think about it... if you were air, wouldn't you want to float as high as possible to the lowest pressure point in the system?

Have you given any more thought to verifying the pressure gauge which we spoke of way back?
 
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