Boiler replacement question

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Old 11-16-13, 07:14 PM
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Boiler replacement question

I currently have 1977 burnham boilerName:  image.jpg
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Size:  24.6 KB and though it is purring along serving us well I would like to be ready and have found a very nice burnham model 206NCL-LEG2 that is a 2005 and very close in size to my current boiler ...the question is: the "LEG2" apparently means this boiler was mfg. for a gravity type application?? The owner however had it piped with one zone and a bell&gossett pump....I guess I wanna know if there is any reasons this boiler would NOT be applicable to my 6 zone setup? OR what changes would need to be made if any besides the way it's piped to my existing setup? Is there some mili-volt change on these over the typical 206NCL-TEI2 models I see more of? Thanks in advance for any advice or thoughts.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 07:54 PM
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I dunno Dog...

In general I don't think it's a good idea to consider a used boiler. Will the owners pay you to remove it from their premises? Maybe then it would be worthwhile.

When you say 'close in size', do you mean physically? or BTUH output ?

Chances are pretty good that your boiler is oversized for the application. 90% of them were, back in the day.

How many square feet is your home?

Before considering any boiler, you owe it to yourself to do a HEAT LOSS estimate on the home and know how big a boiler you need, BTU-wise, before proceeding.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 08:27 PM
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Thanks trooper and I was guessing that you might say that
Size meaning btuh output...house is 2000 sf with another 1000 sf finished in basement, heated two garage with a zone. I really never run all zones at once unless all are occupied...I was thinking of the oversizing back in the day also and see many of the smaller 130k 205 model burnhams which might suffice ...do need to do the heat loss I guess but searching for deals seems to be all I look for and prevail most of the time...go figure...just wish I could talk to someone without a vested interest in what I do for the advice thus my posts here...I've been told this one might last many years.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 08:43 PM
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Did you see the link for the Slant Fin calculator at the top of the forum? might be a good idea just to have a good grasp of what you need.

Just as a quickie 'rule of thumb' figure on your home...

With the heated garage and all, you could well be close to 100K BTUH.

What temp do you keep the garage at? Is it in-slab radiant?

It looks like the IBR on your current boiler is 120,900 ? Am I seeing that right? If so, it's not TERRIBLY over-sized... maybe a little.

I've been told this one might last many years.
It could!
 
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Old 11-16-13, 08:46 PM
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It looks like the air vent on top of the scoop is leaking... or was...

How about the expansion tank? When was the last time the air charge in that was checked?

Read:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...sion-tank.html
 
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Old 11-16-13, 09:00 PM
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I'll check out the slant fin calc and used to have a footage count on my baseboard convectors but have forgotten ill re measure and is all I have no slab radiant in use....yes the current IBR is 120900...btw I never heat garage but do leave the stat at 41 in case the door gets left open...other concerns with current set-up no vent damper! And tons of heat sucking up the the 30 foot chimney melting plenty of snow around that rock surrounded chimney end = ice dams below....should have looked into adding a vent damper long ago.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 09:03 PM
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Yes it was leaking...at some point not anymore though....boiler needs new Gage's can't even read them due to location under milky plastic covers built into top of case...bad location IMO ....expansion tank has never been checked that I know of in the ten years I've owned the place. I take that back I think I did have it checked when I had some service done a few years back...just went down and looked at it and definitely don't think it's full of water or is it leaking at this time. Here's a picture of the info plate on the 206 I was looking at. Name:  image.jpg
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Old 11-16-13, 09:40 PM
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should have looked into adding a vent damper long ago
You may find the masonry at the top of the chimney in poor condition.

In addition to vent damper, an INSULATED CHIMNEY LINER is highly recommended.

boiler needs new Gage's
Have you seen this?

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...ure-gauge.html

used to have a footage count on my baseboard convectors but have forgotten ill re measure
Not really important at this point, and doesn't enter into the heat LOSS calculations.

definitely don't think it's full of water
I bet there's more water in it than you think there is!

If it started at 12 PSI how many years ago? "... a few years back..." ? and it lost even 1 PSI per year... it would now be low on air charge.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 04:13 PM
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Well Trooper: still figuring to deal with this system at some point...probly this next summer...the insulated chimney liner would sure help the heat lost in masonary chimney (which looks good..checked it out today...clay liner is sound) it certainly should help the roof ice problems...a new boiler with vent damper would sure be a plus , not to mention a LOT easier to do at the same time! and give me piece of mind and maybe 10% better efficiency I'm guessing...this current boiler is no better than 70% right if that? meanwhile Ill get this tank pressure checked out (thanks) and basically get ready....sure wish I could talk to someone like you (just easier) but dont suppose that's possible for fear the phone would never stop ringing...LOL...I do appreciate these forums though and being able to run these questions by you experts getting your advice and thoughts. With soo many different options/systems available these days (and believe me I've looked into many) I find myself feeling more comfortable following the old "KISS" ethic....and after all...this simple 36 year old Burnham bolier certainly exemplifys that and works for me!
 
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Old 11-20-13, 04:23 PM
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insulated chimney liner would sure help the heat lost in masonary chimney
The liner isn't for heat loss. It's to prevent the flue gases from losing too much heat on their way out and the water vapor content of those flue gases condensing into liquid water, catching the carbonic and nitric acids present in those gases, depositing those acids onto the surrounding materials, and slowly destroying the materials. The water vapor needs to remain a vapor until it exits the chimney else damage will occur.

this current boiler is no better than 70%
No, probably not that bad! High 70's maybe... possibly even 80...

sure wish I could talk to someone like you (just easier) but dont suppose that's possible for fear the phone would never stop ringing
Yeah, and I'd have to figure out how to charge your credit card! Unlike volunteering my time here. You are welcome to ask as many boiler related questions here... for free.

I find myself feeling more comfortable following the old "KISS" ethic
I do too actually.

But even the simplest of systems need due diligence and preventative maintenance!
 
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Old 11-20-13, 04:44 PM
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The water vapor needs to remain a vapor until it exits the chimney else damage will occur
Gotcha BUT it would also help a great deal in heat transfer to outside...I understand a pourable ins. material is even added around liner

No, probably not that bad! High 70's maybe... possibly even 80...
Really! so these newer burnham series 2s are no better claiming an 82% AFUE?

charge your credit card!
and I would pay, but thanks for your free service


But even the simplest of systems need due diligence and preventative maintenance!
I'm working on it and have that slant fin calc down loaded.
 
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