Similar problem ( air in hot water loop)

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  #41  
Old 12-02-13, 04:46 PM
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When I drained the system to get to zero pressure, I noticed that it only took about a half cup of water to drop the pressure quickly to zero. Soooooooo, I do not have much water in the system to begin with?? I guess having a constant drippy PRV is causing this?
That's actually not unbelievable. Remember that WATER can NOT be compressed, so once the system is full of water and with a waterlogged expansion tank, it takes very little water to go from ZERO to 15 PSI.

when I fire up the system, the pressure rises towards 30 PSI pretty quickly now. I'm at a loss. Am I now running steam?
That's a very clear indication that you have no expansion capacity left. Water expands as it's heated of course... and since it takes so little water to pressurize a system without a functioning tank, you don't have to heat the system much at all to see a sudden rise in pressure.

No, you aren't running steam...

After you replace the tank you should see a SLOW rise from 12-15 PSI up to maybe 20 PSI or so... probably less. This is the air cushion in the expansion tank being squeezed and the expanded water going into the tank rather than causing fast and extreme pressure increase.
 
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  #42  
Old 12-02-13, 05:07 PM
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OK guys...got it. Thanks.

I may be able to source one of these Extrol tanks at a plumbing supply store near me, which would be nice since the weather will be cooperating over the next couple days.......just in case I fudge this up and have to make an emergency call to the "pros."

Question - is there something I can spray on the fitting that will help me loosen it up later? It has not been touched in 20 years and it looks like it's going to be potential trouble.
 
  #43  
Old 12-02-13, 05:13 PM
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NJ Trooper -

Thanks for following this thread and sharing all this valuable information. Too bad you don't live in Chicago.
 
  #44  
Old 12-02-13, 05:42 PM
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After you replace the tank you should see a SLOW rise from 12-15 PSI up to maybe 20 PSI or so... probably less. This is the air cushion in the expansion tank being squeezed and the expanded water going into the tank rather than causing fast and extreme pressure increase.
Well...... that makes perfect sense.

I will report back when I have replaced the tank.
 
  #45  
Old 12-03-13, 11:15 AM
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Score!!

The local plumbing supply store had the #30 Extrol tank in stock.

Time to jettison the old tank.

I shut the main water feed to the system off and drained enough water to get a ZERO pressure reading. I also closed the return valve (I think) - not sure if that was needed, but I wanted to cut off any gravitational water feed as well.

Removing the old tank wasn't much fun. I knew loosening a 20-yr old fitting wasn't going to be easy, so overnight I wrapped the joint with a vinegar-soaked paper towel. Used two wrenches as advised - one to hold the copper pipe fitting still and one to spin the old tank off.





As NJ Trooper advised it could be very heavy and that it was. I figure there was three gallons of water in it. As soon as I pulled the copper pipe off, water started to pour out fast. I filled a small bucket numerous times before enough water was purged. This really helped to lighten the load though. Then I had to wrestle the damned thing out of that fricken cubby hole. Ugh.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yLlOcLxJyw

New tank installed. As advised, only wrapped Teflon tape over 3/4 of the threads (leaving the first couple threads bare) and only wrapped the pipe with two turns of tape.



The tank was preset to what I believe is 15lbs of pressure. Measured this with my bike pump. I'll remeasure with my tire gauge later. Anyway, I repressurized the system and fired it up.

Cold reading:


Hot reading (the aquastat is set at 170):


No leaks at the tank union so far. I still have knocking noises in the pipes, but my old expansion tank was definitely dead. I do not have any water dripping from the PRV now and the hot system pressure seems to be running comfortably around 21-23lbs.

Look good?
 
  #46  
Old 12-03-13, 04:46 PM
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Look good?
Sure does! See that, and you almost threw in the towel! I knew you could do it!

Pressure is a TAD, a WEE TAD, higher than I might have expected, but I suppose you may have a bit more water in the system than some.

OR, that gauge could be slightly suspect.

Now, what are we going to do about the noises?
 
  #47  
Old 12-03-13, 05:17 PM
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Pressure is a TAD, a WEE TAD, higher than I might have expected, but I suppose you may have a bit more water in the system than some.
I need to verify the pressure reading on the expansion tank as well. I won't trust a bike pump gauge for the ultimate reading. Problem is, I only have one tire pressure gauge and it's in my son's car right now. Got to fetch that tomorrow to double check.

OR, that gauge could be slightly suspect.
I have the parts ordered to build my pressure jig to verify the installed pressure gauge. The temperature reading appears to be spot on. It heats right up to 170 (aquastat setting) like a champ.


Now, what are we going to do about the noises?
My Spirovent is kaput (I think) and I do not own a strap wrench, so I ordered a couple last week. I intend to dismantle the top housing of the air separator and clean it. The whole time I have been working in that very confined space, I have not heard, seen or felt any air venting from the tip of the Spirovent. I tried spraying the tip with WD40 and sticking a paperclip in the hole a bit, but nothing. As a backstop, I'll make sure my plumbing supply store stocks a replacement head. The unit that I have is original so almost 21 years old.

I figure the first thing to do is make sure the system is running properly (free of air) before I start ripping apart the basement ceiling to inspect the internal pipes.
 
  #48  
Old 12-03-13, 06:48 PM
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the first thing to do is make sure the system is running properly
True... any maintenance items that you take care of along the way, even if they aren't the root cause of the noise problem, are a good thing.
 
  #49  
Old 12-03-13, 11:26 PM
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Got my Winters pressure gauge. It's solid....and yes, the 1/4" connector is on the back.

 
  #50  
Old 12-04-13, 11:49 PM
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So...... having run the boiler a couple days with the new expansion tank all appears to be going very well. The pressure is normalized even when both zones are open and the system is running up to 170. It hovers around 22PSI hot and 13PSI cold.

Tonight I noticed a drop of water sitting on the Spirovent nozzle. I don't know if I should be happy about this. At first I was like YAY!! Something's coming out of the Spirovent....maybe it will work. But that single drop of water just sat there until I wiped it away. It's NOT leaking water in any sort of significant manner at all and it still does not seem to be venting air.

Is there a way to test a Spirovent or should I stop procrastinating and just order a new head? Thoughts?
 
  #51  
Old 12-05-13, 05:58 AM
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That drop of water probably indicates that it 'burped' some air and waited for you to wipe it's chin...

Is there a way to test a Spirovent or should I stop procrastinating and just order a new head? Thoughts?
I don't know of a way to test. Do you have air in the system still?

Again, if there is air, you will hear 'whooshing, gurgling, indigestion' type noises. Typically not a 'banging' type of noise. You CAN get a 'popping' sound when an air bubble goes through a circ pump...

I'm still not convinced that you actually have an air problem and that the SV isn't working.
 
  #52  
Old 12-05-13, 09:42 AM
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I have a "whooshing" sound when the boiler kicks in. I can hear it in the utility room and in a couple different rooms throughout the house. It's not very loud though, but it's there.

This morning, I found another drip hanging on Mr Spirovent's chin:



I'm going to give the kind folks at Spirotherm a call. They are located in the Chicago suburbs!! Small world eh?
 
  #53  
Old 12-05-13, 11:48 AM
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Just got confirmation that my Spirovent is at least 15yrs old. Debbie @ Spirotherm was very helpful. I can replace the head with part number PJR000HA.

Now while I was taking pressure readings on the expansion tank and while I was hooking up my pressure testing jig to verify the installed temp/pressure gauge, the Spirovent sneezed!! So maybe it's not as bad as I thought. I'll give it a week or so and see what happens.

Using a tire gauge to measure the expansion tank gave me a more accurate reading. I measured 13psi following the instructions in the sticky.

My installed pressure gauge appears to be fine as it matches off very closely to my pressure test jig.





Here's what makes up my pressure testing jig:

1) Winters PFQ Series 0-30 psi Liquid Filled Pressure Gauge
2) Anderson Metals Brass Garden Hose Fitting, Connector, 3/4" Male Hose ID x 1/4" Female Pipe
3) Six foot washing machine hose similar to this one (I got mine on ebay for $8 and free shipping)

 
  #54  
Old 12-05-13, 05:00 PM
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Yeah, I would give the SV more time to do it's job.

Remember that it doesn't sneeze every time it catches a single bubble, it has to collect a whole sinus full of air before the float drops enough to open the valve. So it could go days collecting air, then ACHOO! and then not do it again for another few days.

I've been thinking about what tool I would use if I wanted to open those holes up... the least dangerous to the pipe... and I decided that one of those 'oscillating' saws might be the best bet. Very easy to control. Use a 'plunge blade', a narrow one, and carefully cut away the restrictions.

Oscillating Multifunction Power Tool
 
  #55  
Old 12-06-13, 05:48 PM
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I have one of those oscillating multi-tools and they aren't as stable as they appear. It's not a bad idea though. Thanks.

We're in a real deep freeze in Chicago right now, so the heat is working a lot and it's pretty damned noisy. The pipe tapping happens every time the boiler kicks on and it happens in BOTH zones. It seems like after the boiler has been on for like 10 minutes or so, the noise stops for the most part, with only an infrequent knock here and there. Then when the boiler is off and the pipes are cooling, there is some more noise but not as bad as when the boiler initializes. Does that make sense?

I do not get a lot of noise from the pipes under the baseboard covers. In fact, they are pretty quiet...very quiet actually. The noise is definitely originating within our walls and floor/ceiling. This i'm positive of.

I have no clue where the embedded pipes run. I can only guess from their entry points into the walls/floors. The noises are concentrated on both ends of the house with not much noise in between. The boiler is located almost in the center of the house in the basement.

Does any of that information help? I'd really like to narrow down exactly what the friggen problem is because there's no way i will go the whole winter season with this noise. It's 18 degrees F right now. It will get colder and I can only imagine how effin noisy it will get. It's like a drumline inside our walls/floors/ceiling when the boiler kicks in. Arrrrrrrggggggg.

There's no way the heating system was like this the whole time. Nobody could live with this noise season after season and the prior owners lived here for 17 years!! Before them, the actual builder of the house lived here for the first 3-4 years.

Any thoughts on this? What typically would be done to isolate the problem? Will I have to cut into the basement ceiling to view the actual pipes?
 
  #56  
Old 12-07-13, 11:37 AM
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It seems like after the boiler has been on for like 10 minutes or so, the noise stops for the most part, with only an infrequent knock here and there. Then when the boiler is off and the pipes are cooling, there is some more noise but not as bad as when the boiler initializes. Does that make sense?
Sure it does. Exactly what I would expect from expansion noises.

Any thoughts on this? What typically would be done to isolate the problem? Will I have to cut into the basement ceiling to view the actual pipes?
Know anybody with a 'snake camera' ? A small exploratory hole is easier to patch than a big head sized one.

Unfortunately, it would seem that at least some exploratory surgery might be required.
 
  #57  
Old 12-07-13, 04:25 PM
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Please watch/listen to this video. I captured this from the basement rec room ceiling. This is what some of the noises sound like. When the boiler first starts up the tapping noises are much faster, like a drum roll and then they slow down to what I captured in this short video. I'll try to get more footage later tonight.

Can you confirm by this video that the noises are expansionary?

Many thanks for all your input.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csqi31mqF5M
 
  #58  
Old 12-07-13, 04:30 PM
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Know anybody with a 'snake camera' ? A small exploratory hole is easier to patch than a big head sized one.

Unfortunately, it would seem that at least some exploratory surgery might be required.
We have six can lights in the basement ceiling. I can certainly get in thru one of those cutouts with a snake camera. Great idea!! I don't know anyone who owns one, but damned if I won't look into buying one myself. I could use it for many other projects anyway.

Also, I'll make sure if I call a contractor in that he's properly equipped to handle this. Although this has been a royal PITA, it's great to know I'm saving some $$$ by NOT having somebody come in to troubleshoot this.
 
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Old 12-07-13, 05:30 PM
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It's a little more 'metallic' sounding than I might have expected, that could be because of the 'agc' on the microphone input, but yes, it's pretty typical that the drum roll starts fast at first as the hot water hits the pipe, then slows and stops once the pipe is expanded. The cool down would be slower because it takes longer to cool off versus the sudden rush of hot water when it starts.

One mistake that I see a lot with inexperienced installers is that they use those copper pipe straps and snug the pipes next to a joist when they should in fact be using wire hangers that will 'give' with the pipe as it expands. I bet that's what yer gonna find... pipe strapped down to framing.

Earlier you mentioned renting a FLIR... I bet you could pinpoint the pipes inside the walls and ceiling with that...

How far back did you set the aquastat? Did you go down to 170F ?
 
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Old 12-07-13, 07:42 PM
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How far back did you set the aquastat? Did you go down to 170F ?
Exactly. And the boiler has been working properly -- firing up to 170 on the temp gauge.

One thing I noticed that I don't understand is sometimes the zone valves close before the boiler even hits 170. I don't know if my thermostats are working properly or what (they also are 20 years old). Seems to me that the zone valves should stay open a little longer and circulate the hot water even after the boiler cycles off?? It doesn't seem to be running efficiently to me, but what do i know?

Anyway, yes, the auqastat is set to 170 and I have been monitoring the "hot" reading on the temp gauge and it lines up well.
 
  #61  
Old 12-07-13, 08:01 PM
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One thing I noticed that I don't understand is sometimes the zone valves close before the boiler even hits 170. I don't know if my thermostats are working properly or what (they also are 20 years old). Seems to me that the zone valves should stay open a little longer and circulate the hot water even after the boiler cycles off??

The t stats are getting satisfied before the boiler reaches temp... The boiler is probably way over-sized for the home...

You may benefit from lowering the boiler temp some more... But not below 140F..

Example I have my boiler set to 150f... I am over radiated. Thats all I need to heat my home on a 10f day....

Try 160F...

I have not re read this thread but tell us...

What is the BTU rating of the boiler?
How many ft of baseboard element only do you have in the home? Total each floor?
How many sq ft is the home?
 
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Old 12-08-13, 06:57 AM
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sometimes the zone valves close before the boiler even hits 170
As Mike has said, the t'stats are satisfied.

Have you told us what t'stats you have? Do they have an 'anticipator' setting? If so, that can sometimes be 'tweaked' to give longer or shorter cycles as needed. Technically, the anticipator setting is supposed to match the current draw of the zone valve, and this should give the correct cycle length, but sometimes given heat loss conditions in a particular home, a slightly shorter or longer cycle may be desired.

In general, if the temperature in the room 'overshoots' the thermostat setting significantly, a 'shorter' setting is needed, if the room temperature doesn't quite meet the setpoint before shutting off, a 'longer' setting would help.
 
  #63  
Old 12-08-13, 11:08 AM
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What is the BTU rating of the boiler?
140k BTU

How many ft of baseboard element only do you have in the home? Total each floor?
Total in home = 223 ft
main floor = 112 ft
basement level = 111 ft

How many sq ft is the home?
2300 sq ft
 
  #64  
Old 12-08-13, 11:20 AM
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The thermostats on both levels are the same- Honeywell Chronotherm III T8602C

https://customer.honeywell.com/resou...0s/68-0056.pdf
 
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Old 12-08-13, 11:29 AM
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You need about 60 k btu to heat the home...

You have 60k btu of baseboard on each floor...

The most heat you will get out the baseboard is 60K... The boiler is oversize... And you only need 60K when its the coldest day of the yr in your area...

380 btu per ft @ 150 f boiler water will get you 42k heat out the BB...Pleanty for shoulder season IMO..



http://www.slantfin.com/images/stori...line2000_r.pdf
 
  #66  
Old 12-08-13, 11:42 AM
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Ok, so the original owners/builders went overboard with the heat.

With this overcapacity, I can safely turn the aquastat down to what? ....140 ??

Is this particular setup dangerous or just overkill? I will say that we have no problem heating the house at all, even with all the problems.

For the life of me I don't understand why the aquastat was originally set to 210 and the main water feed to the system was shut off. I wonder how long the last owners ran their system like that.

On the thermostat, I found this -- Is this what I need to adjust for the cycle timing?

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Old 12-08-13, 11:53 AM
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With this overcapacity, I can safely turn the aquastat down to what? ....140 ??
I wouldn't go that low. Thing is, even if you leave the high at 180, I'd bet that the boiler temperature rarely goes over 150-160 anyway, before the thermostats are satisfied and shut the system down.

I personally wouldn't set it below 160.

Is this particular setup dangerous or just overkill?
Dangerous? You mean like something blowing up? No......................

If the boiler isn't getting hot enough, there is chance of damage to the system from condensation of the flue gases, and this is also the reason I wouldn't turn the temp down below 160.

For the life of me I don't understand why the aquastat was originally set to 210 and the main water feed to the system was shut off. I wonder how long the last owners ran their system like that.
The LO's didn't understand either... or didn't know... and whomever was maintaining the system didn't understand his job either... look at it this way, the LO's put up with the banging pipes for 17 years, right? They didn't care... house gets warm, no problem.

On the thermostat, I found this -- Is this what I need to adjust for the cycle timing?
Yes... but that's not the same thing as the 'anticipator' that I mentioned earlier.
 
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Old 12-08-13, 12:09 PM
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Ah.....flue gas condensation....I DID read about that somewhere...maybe on this forum. Good call.

I will back it down to 160 and see if anything happens. I have a feeling I am going to be inside the ceiling at some point soon however. I figure with this very cold weather we are having presently, the in-wall/floor/ceiling pipes are cooling off really quick in between cycles and therefore the expansion noises are nutso. When the weather was a bit more tolerable, the knocking wasn't as extreme as it has been the last few days. We are in a deep freeze at the moment.

I read in the thermostat manual that the factory setting for heat is six cycles per hour. That jibes with the frequency of pipe knocking and I'm noticing that the damned knocking is very repetitive. In other words it's basically the same "beat" on eact cycle....very annoying and I was a drummer when I was a kid so you'd think it wouldn't faze me.
 
  #69  
Old 12-08-13, 12:12 PM
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Do either of you recommend updated thermostats? Something from this millennium perhaps?
 
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Old 12-08-13, 12:33 PM
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I was a drummer when I was a kid so you'd think it wouldn't faze me.
I bet you kept better time though... if you kept time like that pipe does, you woulda been OUT of my band in a pipe beat!

Do either of you recommend updated thermostats?
I'm from the 'if it ain't broke school'... so no, as long as they work, leave 'em alone.
 
  #71  
Old 12-09-13, 08:08 PM
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Today I removed both t-stats and adjusted them so that:
1) they are no longer on "Adaptive Intelligent Recovery"
2) they are set for hot water heating system (as opposed to GFA)

Not sure if this will yield anything useful, but we'll see. I can always set them back. I'm hoping that the boiler doesn't cycle on/off as much now. While I had the units off of the wall, I noticed that these were the only settings I could change.

Also noticed a fan switch that had two settings: Gas heat / Elec heat

I switched it to ELEC HEAT in the hopes that the fan would kick in when the boiler kicked in. Funny thing - when I did this the fan and the boiler stayed on ALL THE TIME. I guess I shouldn't mess with that switch.

Is there a way to kick on the fan at the same time the boiler fires up and then to switch the fan off when the boiler cycle is finished? I'd like to enable this for the upstairs zone to circulate the air a bit. Right now I do this manually once in awhile and I think it makes a favorable difference both upstairs and downstairs. To be clear, I have dual zone heat and single zone AC. The upstairs t-stat controls the blower and the AC.
 
  #72  
Old 12-17-13, 02:11 PM
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Got a package of goodies from Pex Supply yesterday -- nothing that will immediately fix my loud pipes but stuff that will help out in the long run.

New thermostats - Honeywell TH8110U1003

These are very nice....very flexible in the programming and they have a fan circ function that circulates the air randomly about 30% of the time. This fan function is something I definitely wanted that my old t-stats didn't do.

Also ordered a new Spirovent head assy and inner core. This part of the project didn't go as planned as I could not wrestle off the old vent head no matter what I did. Tried strap wrenches, tried a huge vise grip....no luck. I even grabbed one of my chisels and knocked the crap out of the top trying to loosen it up and I could not get it to budge at all. However, during the beating I dislodged something inside the Spirovent and now the damned thing works!! Well at least it's working for now. Go figure. It's spewing out lots of air.

So back to the "wait and see" mode. I'm contemplating calling in a boiler guy to do the Spirovent head since I'm not confident that the old one will continue to work. Since it clogged itself up once, it will surely do it again in time.

Anyone have any thoughts/suggestions??
 
  #73  
Old 12-18-13, 04:39 PM
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So before I start cutting into my ceiling, I removed two recessed light fixtures and stuck my camera up in between the ceiling drywall and the underside of the main floor to see what's going on up there. This particular area is the where the expansion noise is really bad.

It appears pretty evident what's happening. I can't see any hangers for these pipes. The pipes are wrapped with fiberglass insulation, but at the point where the pipes pass thru the braces there is contact on the actual pipe. It may be hard to see in these pics but I plan to take more in the next few days while I drum up some sort of plan.

I'm open to suggestions. I was thinking of wedging in small lengths of 2x4s under the pipes (where they are wrapped with insulation) to lift them up just a tad so there's no contact with the joists/supports. I don't know how I will reach the spans of pipes without cutting new holes. From this first vantage point, I'm not close enough to stick my arm in the hole and touch the pipes.

I also thought about blowing insulation up in there, but something tells me that's not a smart idea in case I need to access this space in the future.

Help......!!






 
  #74  
Old 12-18-13, 06:13 PM
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I think I'm about 100% down with your diagnosis! I can absolutely see how those pipes could be acting like big bass fiddle bow and 'playing' those joists.

How to fix it though... hmmmm... have to get creative here I think!

I am a bit concerned about those HUGE cutouts in the joist webs though. Why on earth would they do that? They've probably weakened those joists to about 10% of their original strength. How much 'spring' is in the floor above?
 
  #75  
Old 12-18-13, 07:01 PM
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Thanks for the affirmation.

I will be taking the other recessed light cans out to have a peek-a-boo in the other two-thirds of the room over the next few days.

If you look towards the "back" of the pictures, you'll see some duct work passing thru similarly sized cutouts. To me it looks like they made a few too many duct cutouts. Further down in the room (out of sight in these particular pics) there is much more duct work, which if extended, would actually pass thru the holes you see in the above pics. But yeah, you’re right – that’s a needless waste. The floors above this rec room are solid though. No complaints there. I suppose it could be worse. At least they “windowed” the cutouts. If they were completely cut thru, it would probably be a code violation or something.

I’m curious myself to see the construction further down. I will share pics when I take them.
I really need a light bulb moment here. For now all I can think of is to use short lengths of 2x4s under the pipes in between the joists….just to prop them up like a half inch or so. I will need to figure out how to maneuver the 2x4s under the pipes from these recessed light holes though. I really don’t want to cut new holes in the ceiling since patching that stuff up is a major PITA.
 
  #76  
Old 12-18-13, 07:13 PM
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The other thing that is mind boggling is how in the world could people have lived here for 17 years and put up with this noise every winter!?!?

These SlantFin systems are supposed to be silent when they are properly set up and maintained. I love the type of heat they throw out -- definitely better than GFA, but the noise....THE NOISE!!!!
 
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Old 12-18-13, 07:20 PM
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At least they “windowed” the cutouts. If they were completely cut thru, it would probably be a code violation or something.
I'm actually kinda surprised they passed as is! I think there's some kind of 'percentage' rule as to how much of the vertical web they can cut out on those.

I saw the other ductwork and figured they were cut because of a "duhhhhhh, ooops! moment" by the HVAC guys.

I will need to figure out how to maneuver the 2x4s under the pipes from these recessed light holes though. I really don’t want to cut new holes in the ceiling since patching that stuff up is a major PITA.
Hard to judge how far you need to go... but of course you can't get a long length of 2x4 in there so you'll have to use short pieces. You might be able to get a much longer 'push stick' in there though and maneuver the 2x4 in place and push under.

I don't blame you for not wanting to cut access holes. Drywall is one of my least favorite jobs... and drywall on the ceiling is major pain!
 
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Old 12-19-13, 02:38 PM
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So I had a brain storm last night. My wife would say brain fart but whatever.

Make a wedge out of piece of 2x4 (like the shape of a door stopper). Use a fish line to pull the wedge under the pipe to lift it up slightly so it doesn't run against the joist openings. Will it work??

Here's my first prototype. It's a minor FAIL because it doesn't fit up in thru the recessed light hole. LOL. I had to pull one of the support feet off. The screw is to attach the fish line.



So I fed the fish line in from one side of the room and my son received the line at the other side and hooked it to the pipe-propper-upper thinggy and I pulled it up to and under the pipe and gave it a good tug to jam it in there. It doesn't look like it from this angle, but it's actually under the pipe!! It's not secured, however - just sitting there for now while I see if it makes any difference.



After I fired up the boiler and pushed up the t-stats so both zones would engage, I noticed LESS noise initially. Then I had to leave for work, so over the next few days we'll see what happens.

I suspect that if this works, I can go down the line to the other recessed light cans and install similar pipe supports and hopefully the noise will completely go away. As far as securing the support jig, I can locate it with a stud finder and hit it with a couple drywall screws.

Keeping the fingers crossed.
 
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Old 12-19-13, 03:58 PM
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Ya know, I had a brain fart last night myself... guess what? it was very similar to yours! I was envisioning a wedge shaped thingy like that. My design had less 'pitch' to the wedge though.

Of course, I also had an R/C robot in the mental design stages to maneuver it into place, complete with a construction adhesive gun in it's holster to glue it down.

Over thinking, over analyzing,
separates the body from the mind.
Withering my intuition, missing opportunities and I must
feed my will to feel my moment drawing way outside the lines.

Spiral out.
Keep going
 
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Old 12-19-13, 07:45 PM
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Of course, I also had an R/C robot in the mental design stages to maneuver it into place, complete with a construction adhesive gun in it's holster to glue it down.

Yeah I made a similar (robot) joke to my 19yr old son who helped me earlier today. He said we must be able to come up with some way of gluing the shim in place since we were so successful in getting it to the pipe in the first place. I can’t think of anything to get it glued in place but I’m ok with a couple drywall screws. Tiny spackle patches over the screws is 100x better than replacing and patching a big drywall cutout.

Unfortunately my wife has already informed me that most of the pipe noise is still there – in her opinion. I’m still going to stick with this “shim” idea but I will cut new ones with a more gradual slope like you mentioned. I will get that pipe lifted and quiet. This is a quest now….no longer a simple DIY boiler project.

Got to love technology btw. We used a GoPro and the GoPro iphone app as our “eyes” for this. Tomorrow I will actually record some of the footage.
 
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