FR 205 N. Yorker, Adding Electric hot water heater?

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Old 12-22-13, 09:56 AM
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FR 205 N. Yorker, Adding Electric hot water heater?

Howdy,

I am back and very warm/happy! Thanks for all the prior help! . *main part is last paragraph, rest is filler for those who read my last thread.

About 2 weeks ago I had an older boiler man come work on my boiler and boy did I learn a lot about it! I believe it just might be indestructible. He said it has stone insulation and is lined with brick instead of the fiber insulation in the firing chamber, or something along those lines. The only part I needed replaced was my motor. Everything worked perfect.

Using this system these 2 weeks I have realized that I THINK I want a separate hot water heater for my domestic hot water. I have good initial pressure on my hot water but then it dies down. The service man said it was most likely due to build up/scale in the coil and it appears someone in the past ran acid through it due to the closed Tees on both cold in and hot out. This particular boiler has a 46 gallon hold (I am not sure if that is the domestic or radiator water but I believe it is for the radiator water).

I spoke to the service man and he said it would be possible to add another water heater but you would have to bypass the domestic coil because without doing an acid flush or coil replacement your water pressure would still be low even with an additional electric water heater due to the build up in the coil. He also mentioned that you could get the coil flushed and have the boiler preheat the water for you, this sounds like it would use up a good bit of oil though (Electric is cheaper here). So without me spending countless minutes on the phone with some person explaining the options to me I figured I would ask here as I will be able to reference back easier. Anyone have any thoughts on these 2 types of installations??
 
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Old 12-22-13, 10:10 AM
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Any thoughts..... sure.
Completely disconnect the domestic hot water from the boiler and use the electric water heater only.
 
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Old 12-22-13, 10:12 AM
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For reference, here is a link to Flash's previous post... and his natural beer cooler in the basement.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...r-heaters.html

Me personally would abandon the coil inside the boiler. If your electric rates are good, then that would seem to be the best way to go. Even with BAD electric rates, it's still gotta be cheaper than burning fuel to heat a few gallons of water a day.

Did your 'guy' mention anything about having to re-work the boiler controls in order that the boiler did not maintain the temperature? Even after the coil is disconnected, without this step the boiler will still fire up to maintain a temperature inside...

What aquastat control have you got on your boiler? It could be a VERY easy modification!
 
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Old 12-22-13, 10:19 AM
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I just looked up your boiler... it's oil fired, horizontal fire-tube design.

Did the service guy do a thorough cleaning of the firetubes and combustion chamber?

I'm sure he changed oil filters, nozzle, adjusted burner, etc?
 
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Old 12-22-13, 02:20 PM
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Ya I am kind of thinking that bypassing the coil completely might be the best as well. I have a 230 V connection in my basement for random stuff anyway . The beer cooler is still operational, stays right around 40 degs in that room year round.

l had to have a very thorough cleaning. He did a lot of stuff, when I said only one part replaced I meant major part (around $75 I think). A short list would be: a new nozzle (80 deg at 1.5 gph fire rate if I recall), some burner gasket, new flue (mine had a rather large hole in the bottom from rust, dang creek in the basement!), new motor, lubricant for circulating pumps, cleaned out the other 2 removable parts of the becket system, used calipers on the shock/spark thingamagigs, new oil filter, and cleaned out the inside of the boiler completely. The system hadn't run in awhile and the last maintenance was way over due. I was very pleased with his work, extremely sociable and spent time with me to help me understand everything on the system.

Ok he said there would need to be some things done but didn't get in-depth as I don't have all the money together for it yet. Oil and maintenance set me back a bit. He did say that he wouldn't recommend altering the settings at 160 LO, 180 HI and 15 DIFF, because that is what is recommended for the baseboard heaters with it being 0 degrees outside for my area (does that make any sense?). As for my specific aquastat I am not entirely sure. It has a Honeywell cover . When I am back home tomorrow I will check and post, don't have internet there! Anything specific I should be looking for to determine if I have the correct system for this?
 
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Old 12-22-13, 02:45 PM
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Sounds to me as if you've found a good, conscientious, and experienced service person! You don't know how lucky you are... or do you?

1.5 gph fire rate
Good grief, that's a huge boiler! How many square feet did you say the home is?

He did say that he wouldn't recommend altering the settings at 160 LO, 180 HI and 15 DIFF, because that is what is recommended for the baseboard heaters with it being 0 degrees outside for my area
Only the HIGH setting has anything at all to do with the baseboard heating.

What I am probably going to recommend is that you do a simple modification that completely disables the LOW and DIFF settings so that the boiler doesn't keep itself warm for no reason. Once you've abandoned that coil, there is no logical reasoning to keep the boiler at 160F 24/7.

Anything specific I should be looking for
Only the aquastat model number, which I'm betting is going to be an L8124 series.
 
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Old 12-22-13, 02:48 PM
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I have a 230 V connection in my basement for random stuff anyway
You will need a 30A line... 10 gauge wire... and once you've connected the water heater to it, you really shouldn't use it for anything else. So, no power saws, grow lights, etc...

Unless it's like a 50A line... then you could theoretically install a sub-panel and run the water heater off that and still have 20A left over for other uses.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 11:12 AM
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The home is maybe 1,600 sq ft. That's with 600 sq ft addition. This old farm house originally was 1 bedroom with baby room attached to bedroom, 1 full bath and toilet + 80 sq ft kitchen and small living space. Amazing what large farming family would have lived in. I love it though! A lot of character in this old place and a really solid feel. I bet in 200 years this house will still be the same unless someone knocks it down lol.

My aquastat says: triple aquastat relay type L8124A, C. 2000 va max load with 360 va ignition.

I read some other treads. I barely use hot water. No dishwasher or washer/dryer. And only warm showers. Is it possible to adjust my hi, lo and diff? The guy said I shouldn't mess with it but I don't know if he realized how little Hot water I used lol.
 
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Old 12-23-13, 11:55 AM
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I'm betting that you could get by with a boiler ONE QUARTER the BTU rating of that one. It really is HUGE for the application.

If you do eventually switch to a stand-alone water heater, it will be a simple, completely reversible, modification to the L8124 aquastat to convert it to a cold start system.

In the meantime, I would begin by DECREASING the LOW LIMIT setting to 140F and push the DIFF up to 20F.

The LOW is the temperature that the boiler maintains when there is on heat call. The DIFF acts only on the LOW setting... these two settings have no affect on the CENTRAL HEATING part which is controlled solely by the HIGH setting.

If you find that you can manage with the hot water that setting the LOW at 140, then you will save some money on fuel.
 
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