Gypsum Board/Drywalling Over Radiator Within Wall

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Old 12-23-13, 04:44 PM
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Gypsum Board/Drywalling Over Radiator Within Wall

We are in the middle of remodeling our 1930's bathroom in our home, and have radiators that are installed within the wall cavity of the exterior wall of the bathroom. When we did the demo on the bathroom we removed all the previous 2 inches of cement/mortar wall and tile. We recently placed gypsum board drywall over the radiator, and realized that this might be a fire hazard. Is it safe to place gypsum board directly over a radiator, or does some sort of fire-retardant paper or foil need to be covering the gypsum board? Is it safe having a radiator that is this old, or should we consider replacing it altogether?

Any advice would be of great help!
Thanks!
 
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Old 12-23-13, 04:53 PM
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We recently placed gypsum board drywall over the radiator, and realized that this might be a fire hazard
Do you think the radiator is going to get hot enough to ignite combustibles?

Let me say that if it DID get that hot, you have far more to worry about than it setting drywall on fire!

But I think the real question is this:

It sounds as if you are describing covering over the radiators inside the wall?

How are you going to heat the home with the radiators inside the wall and covered over with drywall?

Or am I misunderstanding something?
 

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Old 12-24-13, 02:37 AM
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Perhaps a pic or two might help us to better understand - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

How much clearance is between the radiator and the drywall? I'm also having a hard time understanding how the heat is going to work if it's trapped by the drywall

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 12-24-13, 01:46 PM
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Clarification

Thanks for your response!

The radiator is within the wall, and there is a metal grate/vent about 1 foot above the radiator on the wall, AND there is a 2 ft x 3 in opening at the floor. So the heat escapes both through the upper vent and through the opening at the floor.

The radiator itself doesn't seem to get too hot (we've kept touching it to check), but we just want to make sure we are taking the correct steps to make sure we don't cause a fire in our home.

I've attached 2 photos, one of that area of the room BEFORE the major demolition began, and you can see the upper vent and it's a bit tough to see the lower opening since the toilet was in the way. The other photo shows the revealed radiator that was hidden within the wall after we demolished almost everything in the room.

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Old 12-24-13, 01:49 PM
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Also, there is only about 1 inch between the drywall and the radiator coils
 
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Old 12-24-13, 02:41 PM
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Is the piping to the rad steel or copper?

I can't see the rad clearly in cell phone pics... especially sideways ones... but it appears to be tubes with fins on it?

Poor design to start with. How did they expect that anyone would get in there to vacuum the dust out of the fins periodically? I bet that thing was/is completely clogged with dust. Of course you would get no heat out of it...

But, there might also be a flow issue with not enough hot water getting to it, or it could have been 'air locked'. Is that an air bleeder on the vertical pipe on the left side?

So you are planning drywall and replacing the air vents then? Basically the same idea as what was there but with drywall instead of the lath/plaster/tile?

I believe I would consider taking the radiator out of the wall... but if you have steel piping, it's a major job... if it's copper, not so bad... and then replacing with a modern PANEL RADIATOR. Might even consider some heated towel racks too.

That is the oddest looking subfloor construction I've ever seen!
 
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Old 12-24-13, 05:14 PM
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To answer your original question, there's really no danger of fire. Neither steam or hot water in the pipes can be hot enough to cause something to ignite
 
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Old 12-24-13, 05:25 PM
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No way is drywall going to be a fire hazard.
You heating system is never going to be hot enough to catch anything on fire.
http://www.lafarge-na.com/Drywall%20MSDS%20English.pdf

I agree about that subfloor, looks like for some reason someone added supports to the sides of the joist then added all those tiny pieces.
That's the second one I've seen posted here like that.
It's useless as a subfloor. I'd bet if you checked it with a level as a flat edge it's going to be way off.
 
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Old 12-24-13, 07:02 PM
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Any room in there for some sort of toe kick heater, probably not.
 
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Old 12-25-13, 12:26 PM
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room in there for some sort of toe kick heater,
There are cabinets designed for in wall flush mounting of toe kick heaters...

Beacon Morris Wall & Floor Kits - Kick Space Heater Wall Kits - Kick Space Heater Floor Kits - PexSupply.com
 
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