Suntec pump pressure?

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Old 01-05-14, 09:19 AM
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Suntec pump pressure?

I have a Burnham PV74WBT boiler with a Becket AFG motor. The pump, a Suntec A2AV-7116, seems to be leaking around the shaft. It seems to be sucking the fuel oil into the motor/fan area and dripping out the bottom of the motor housing. Is this a common problem? I ordered a pump and plan on replacing it, but my question is: How do I know what pressure the pump should be set at? I'm assuming the new pump will be at 100 psi. I think from my research that it needs to be at 140 psi, but am not sure about that. Also, if it does need to be 140 psi, how do I make that adjustment? I am an automatic transmission mechanic and have a Snap-on automotive style pressure gauge, can I use something like that? Thanks for any help you can provide.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 09:52 AM
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Let's start with the existing install...

Do you have one tube or TWO between the tank and the pump?

This question is important because it leads to the leaking seal.

The pumps have an INTERNAL BYPASS PLUG that MUST be REMOVED for use with one pipe systems. If this plug is not removed for one pipe, the internal pressure will blow out the seals. The plug must be installed for a two pipe system.

The new pump will come with the plug NOT installed and will be packed separately in the box.

How do I know what pressure the pump should be set at?
Need to check the specs for the boiler/burner combination. Older systems almost always 100 PSI. Yours 'proably' is... should be able to find boiler manual on web if you don't have.

Do you know what GPH nozzle is spec'd? And the BTUH INPUT rating of the boiler? Can deduce pump pressure from that.

if it does need to be 140 psi, how do I make that adjustment? ... have a Snap-on automotive style pressure gauge, can I use something like that?
There is a pressure adjustment screw on the upper side facing away from the boiler. There's a 'big ole nut' with a screw adjustment in the center.

You can attach the gauge to the port on the top of the pump. It's 1/8" NPT. Alternately you can attach to nozzle port, but going on the top port is much easier IMHO.

Start burner and adjust to spec.

Some info in PDF here:

http://s3.pexsupply.com/product_file...6-brochure.pdf

More can be found by internet searching.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 10:09 AM
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I. ADJUST OIL PRESSURE.

1. Locate oil pressure adjusting screw and turn screw
to obtain 140 PSI pressure (100 PSI for V74R only).
I believe that the " R " designation means 'reduced input' so doesn't apply to your boiler.

I suppose that you could hook up pressure gauge and see what you have now? that is, presuming it has been set properly from day one... and not buggered in the following years.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 10:29 AM
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It is not normal for the pump to be leaking. It sounds as if the seal is gone.
The pump comes preset at 100 psi. Most are still run @ 100. If your boiler was run @140psi you need to adjust it.

A description of the pump ports and instructions comes with the pump.
You can remove the bleeder and put a gage in there. Remove the appropriate plug and adjust pressure with Allen wrench.

A word of caution. Find out what your current pump is running at and don't take it for granted.
Changing pressure is easy. It's the air adjustments that must be made to accommodate that pressure for proper combustion. Instruments should be used to obtain final results.

Editing post.
Trooper and I were posting at the same time. He has probably covered this info already in much more detail.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 10:55 AM
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You can remove the bleeder and put a gage in there.
Spott, does that apply to the A2VA-7116 also? I forget... been a while since I messed with that one.

I know you can do that with the newer 'clean cut'... but IMHO, it's easier to use the gauge port on the top of the pump for the older pumps.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 01:01 PM
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Trooper, yes either way. Gauge port is fine and easy enough.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 02:29 PM
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NJ Trooper,
I do have a 2 line system with a return line back to the tank. It is a very small leak, but makes my finished basement smell like fuel oil. I was aware of the by-pass valve, but thanks for the reminder. This pump has been on since the furnace was newly installed in 2006. Just started a slow leak.

It has a 1.10 X 80 B nozzle, but I cannot find a BTUH Input anywhere. I did just find a tag on the bottom of the motor with this information:
Fire range 1.00-1.35 GPH
AF44WP
"For V74 use 140 PSI only
1.10 X 80 B Nozzle
For 1.35 GPH"

That would make me assume that I was right about the 140 PSI, but as Spott suggested, I will check the pressure of the old one before taking it off. Never thought of that.

My gauge for transmissions is 1/8 " NPT so it should work.

I will have to see what that "R" means, if it is "reduced" I guess that could make it 100 PSI. I don't know. Gonna mess with it tomorrow some more. It's running fine, just dripping a little.

Thanks a million for all the info guys, be sure to let me know anything else that may be helpful.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 03:08 PM
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Ok, double and triple checked, and you are correct, No "R's" can be found. I misread the post the first time. My bad.


"I. ADJUST OIL PRESSURE.

1. Locate oil pressure adjusting screw and turn screw
to obtain 140 PSI pressure (100 PSI for V74R only)."

Now I'm being really dumb, but where did you find this info?

Thanks.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 03:31 PM
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"For V74 use 140 PSI only
1.10 X 80 B Nozzle
For 1.35 GPH"
This right here is the 'tell'.

Nozzles GPH is rated at 100 PSI.

A 1.10 nozzle at 140 PSI will flow 1.35 GPH.

In order to 'reduce' the input, there are other things that need to be done to the burner, not just reducing the pump pressure. It's not that easy...

where did you find this info?
In the manual for the Burnham V7 series...
 
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Old 01-05-14, 03:39 PM
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Suntec instructions say not to use the bleeder port to measure pump pressure on the A-7000 series:

Pressure Check: Use the 1/8" NPT GAGE PORT or 1/8" NPT NOZZLE PORT. DO NOT USE THE EASY FLOW BLEEDER VALVE PORT, as the reading will be too high for nearly all models of this series, resulting in a WRONG operating pressure!
http://www.suntecpumps.com/PDFs/Form...stallation.pdf
 
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Old 01-05-14, 04:12 PM
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Suntec instructions say not to use the bleeder port to measure pump pressure on the A-7000 series:
I had a vague recollection of that... why I asked! Thanks Rock!
 
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Old 01-05-14, 04:41 PM
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I had a vague recollection of that... why I asked! Thanks Rock!
Over the years I've had to service/replace a couple of Suntec pumps (A2VA-7116 and B2VA-8216 models) and so that's probably how I remembered it.

I've saved to hard drive several PDF files from the Suntec site and keep them as reference.

Suntec Pumps Technical Info
 
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Old 01-05-14, 07:08 PM
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Then 140 PSI it is. Thanks so much gentlemen, you guys have been an awesome help. I think I can get this bad boy running tomorrow now. Thanks again.
 
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Old 01-10-14, 08:49 AM
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Again, thank you everyone for the help. I only have one more question. Furnace is running great. I put my gauge on the old pump before removing it and it ran at 133 psi, so I set the new one at 133 psi according to my gauge. My question is: Concerning that "big ole nut", I was assuming that would lock the adjustment screw down and I would need to break it loose to make the adjustment, but I did not have to. The adjustment screw does not "lock down". Is this how it is supposed to be? Just seems like it could move out of adjustment without locking down. Thanks again.
 
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Old 01-10-14, 09:02 AM
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I set the new one at 133 psi according to my gauge.
While 7 PSI won't make much of a difference I'm afraid that we may have not been clear enough in our explanation previously.

The idea was to use the gauge to determine if the orignal was 'at or near' 100 PSI or 'at or near' 140 PSI, not to set the new pump at exactly the same pressure as the old pump.

So in other words, it's clear that the old pump had been set to 140 PSI at one time and that's where you should have set the new one.

Still, subject to gauge accuracy...... when was the last time your gauge was checked for accuracy?

Like I said though, 7 PSI is not really far off enough to worry about it... at least _I_ wouldn't be [worried about it].

The adjustment screw does not "lock down". Is this how it is supposed to be?
I'm with ya on the 'locknut' to keep the adjustment as is, but the fact is that yes, that's how it's supposed to be. The only thing that holds the adjustment is the friction of the O-ring, etc., and they aren't known to move on their own... not a problem.
 
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Old 01-10-14, 11:26 AM
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NJ Trooper,
I guess I should have mentioned that my gauge has never been calibrated that I know of, it was my dads before I started working with him, which was 32 years ago. I bet it is easily 40 years old. That's why I kinda just used it for a reference as to where I should put the new pump. Figured my gauge could easily be off 7 psi or so, probably more likely than not, we rarely use it. thanks again.
 
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