Hydronic Boiler Temp

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-06-14, 04:44 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Hydronic Boiler Temp

Hello All,

I have a small problem with my hydronic heating system.

It is an electric hot water baseboard system. Two zones only, one upstairs, one down. 80% of the living space is upstairs.

The boiler is a Lion Boilers CEB-12.

I've been having an issue ever since I bought the house with how to set the temperature on the system. The house always seems to be too hot, or too cold. The thermostat itself, never seemed to make much of a difference. I have had enough of it, so I finally went out and bought a new Nest thermostat, in hopes to be able to see what is going on better. I have set the boiler to 47C (very middle of the dial).

My big question, is what are the boilers usually set to? I don't want to have to keep adjusting the boiler every day.

Thanks for the help in advance!

- Lindsay
 
Attached Images    
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-06-14, 05:16 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
hello and welcome..

Can you tell us what the pemp and pressure gauge reads on the boiler?

47C is too low... (about 120F).. Raise it to at least 160F and start there...

What type of heat emmitters do you have in the home? Copper finned I would assume> Something else?

What were the old t stats you had?

The thermostat itself, never seemed to make much of a difference.
Should of at least cut off at the set temp no?
 
  #3  
Old 01-06-14, 05:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the response lawrosa.

Temp is at 50C. [ 122F ]
Pressure is at 120kPa. [17-18 PSI]

Only a single tstat. It was an 22 year old Honeywell.

It never seemed to turn off at the set temp. So, I'm guessing it was failing and I didn't really understand what was going on.

I am going to change the temp on the boiler to 71C (160F) as you suggested, but so I understand in the future, do we go higher than the desired temperature to help deal with heatloss and such? What is the reasoning behind the 160F number? I'm guessing it is not a completely arbitrary number.

EDIT: I have attached a picture. The boiler maxes out at 170F. Are you sure 160F is the best place to go? Just seems like pushing the boiler close to the max may not be a good idea? (Admittedly this is outside my field of expertise.)

Name:  2014-01-06 21.25.19.jpg
Views: 1287
Size:  25.2 KB
 

Last edited by NJT; 01-06-14 at 06:10 PM.
  #4  
Old 01-06-14, 05:39 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
That pressure 18psi is a bit high to be at with the boiler only being at 50C...

I believe you will need to sevice the expansion tank soon.. Its probably low on air and needs to be recharged..

Although thats not related to your issue.. At 180F boiler water your pressure will probably rise close to the 30psi mark. At that pressure your relief valve will trip. Have you had issues with relief valve leaking?

Please answer what type of heat emmitters you have? And wait on increasing the temp until you tell me this... And what was the normal setting previously???
 
  #5  
Old 01-06-14, 05:54 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry lawrosa, forgot to tell you the emitters. They are all SlantFin. I will hold off on raising the temperature for now.

I have never had an issue with the relief valve leaking, the system has been installed in this house for 8 years (I have owned the house for 5). Is it normal to have to recharge the system regularly? Follow up to this, would I call a plumber? Electrician? Is it a possible DIY job?

When I purchased the house, it was mid-summer, and they had the breaker to the system off, and the temp turned all the way down. So I honestly do not know.

Thanks again for all your help so far!
 
  #6  
Old 01-06-14, 06:12 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Lindsay, let's see the rest of the piping around the boiler... stand back a bit, not such closeups, let us see everything.

I'm betting that you haven't got a flow check valve and are having issues with 'thermosiphon', 'gravity flow', 'ghost flow', or whatever you want to call it.
 
  #7  
Old 01-06-14, 06:13 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
Is it normal to have to recharge the system regularly?
The expansion tank came precharged with 12psi.. That is the pressure your boiler should be at when its stone cold...

A expansion tank loses air at about 1 or 2 psi a year.. So yes should be checked...The only way to check is with the system drain or no water pressure on the exp tank...

But sorry now that I think about it since the boiler was cool with a 17 psi reading you may be good... I like to read your manual if I can find it and see what the operating pressre is of the boiler...

High pressure can be cause by the fill valve that feeds the boiler being faulty too...

I am just suggesting these things for the future...

Anyway slant fin works best at 180F and is the normal operating temp for them as well as boilers...

If the over radiated the home, meaning installing more baseboard then is required then lower temps can be used... And 180 F temp is only for the coldest time of the yr... On the sholder seasons you can run lower boiler temps to heat the home...

I think your issue may have been the t stat...

Is the t stat hooked up?

I would set the boiler to 150 or 160f and see how it keeps the house warm... Let us know if the stat kicks of at set temp and if it kicks the boiler on when it goes below
 
  #8  
Old 01-06-14, 06:13 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Is it normal to have to recharge the system regularly? Follow up to this, would I call a plumber? Electrician? Is it a possible DIY job?
Yes, normal maintenance that never gets done until there's a problem with the pressure.

See:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...sion-tank.html

Easy DIY.
 
  #9  
Old 01-06-14, 06:18 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
Can you tell me how many ft of baseboard you have element only? ( Not the length of the covers...the actual element)

How many BTU or KW is that boiler?

How many sq ft is the home?
 
  #10  
Old 01-06-14, 06:22 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi NJ, here are the pictures you requested. You will note in a couple pictures, an old expansion tank in the ceiling. It is no longer attached to anything, or in use.


Name:  2014-01-06 22.14.30.jpg
Views: 1598
Size:  45.0 KB


Name:  2014-01-06 22.14.35.jpg
Views: 1330
Size:  46.0 KB


Name:  2014-01-06 22.15.09.jpg
Views: 1465
Size:  38.3 KB


Name:  2014-01-06 22.15.17.jpg
Views: 1260
Size:  34.5 KB


Name:  2014-01-06 22.15.25.jpg
Views: 1424
Size:  39.0 KB
 
  #11  
Old 01-06-14, 06:27 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
OK, I missed the zone valve part... but:

Two zones only, one upstairs, one down.
Yet in the pictures I see THREE zone valves. What's the third one for?

[ never mind, it looks like one is not in use, capped off, is that correct? ]

And those should be enough to stop any thermosiphon, so PARTIALLY scratch that idea for now... keep in back of mind though because in some rare cases, you can still have problems with it... but very rare cases.
 
  #12  
Old 01-06-14, 06:29 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Lawrosa, the boiler is a LION CEB-12. It is 12kW, 240 volts, 50.0 amp, 41,000BTU.

Sq ft of home is just under 1500.

Estimating the element, I would say we are around 85 ft in zone 1, and 12 ft in zone 2. (zone 2 t-stat is set at 12C all the time). Keep in mind, I didn't actually measure, just estimating.
 
  #13  
Old 01-06-14, 06:29 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
The expansion tank looks a bit on the small side... what's the model info on it?

Since this is electric boiler, it might be OK because very little water content in boiler itself.
 
  #14  
Old 01-06-14, 06:33 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The third zone was for an apartment which is attached to the house from a time when we had an oil furnace. When the furnace was removed, they were put onto their own electric baseboard heat. As such, the third zone is no longer in use.
 
  #15  
Old 01-06-14, 06:36 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi NJ.

Expansion tank is an Apollo Valves, 16XT102. 2.1 Gallon Hydronic Expansion tank.
 
  #16  
Old 01-06-14, 06:40 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
2.1 Gallon
This would be considered VERY marginal size for a gas or oil fired boiler system, but may JUST make it for yours.

I would install a 4 gallon when it comes time to replace it.
 
  #17  
Old 01-06-14, 06:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That is definitely something I will keep in mind. How does the tank size affect system performance?

Another question, does running the boiler significantly hotter greatly increase power usage? Just want to know what to expect at power bill time.

I have bumped the boiler up to 155F.

The new Tstat is hooked up. Hooked it up a few hours ago. House was at 26.5c. We are down to 22.5, still dropping. We should know more by morning. Outside temps are supposed to drop by about 30c tonight. Should be a nice test on everything.
 
  #18  
Old 01-06-14, 07:03 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
How does the tank size affect system performance?
The expansion tank is what controls the system pressure from cold to hot.

Since water can not be compressed, but air can, the point of the expansion tank is to place some air in the system which can be compressed when the water is heated and expands.

So, if the pressure on a cool boiler is say 12-15 PSI when the water is heated and expands, that expanded water needs someplace to go and it will squeeze itself into the expansion tank, compressing the air that is trapped in the tank.

Pressure might increase 5-8 PSI in the process. If there were no tank, or one with a low air charge, or too small, the pressure would rise more than normal and open the pressure relief valve.

Nothing to do with the temperature control in the home though, as Mike has stated, but something that should be maintained... BEFORE the relief valve spews!
 
  #19  
Old 01-06-14, 07:22 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
So is eveything running and hooked up? It says its dropping to single didgits up by you all week in the PM...

Do you set the t stat with large setbacks?

IMO, and maybe troop with verify, is to set the t stat at one temp and leave it... Or at most a 2 degree difference with set back.... Say set at 70f and 69f at night...

Now say boiler is at 155f as you stated and you set the t stat to 70 f and the t stat never satifies... That would mean you need to turn the boiler up some to heat the baseboard more to get more heat...

Opposite is true too... If the home heats fine at 155f boiler temp you may be able to turn down the boiler temp. This will save elctric I would think.

The lower temp you can run the boiler the more savings...

But your baseboard is matched pretty good to your heat lose per a rough calculation..

Home should be around 37k btu heat loss, and basboard at 85ft will produce 40kbtu at 170f boiler water... That is only needed for the coldest day of the yr in your area.... And thats your max boiler temp apparently.....
 
  #20  
Old 01-06-14, 07:24 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Another question, does running the boiler significantly hotter greatly increase power usage?
Look at it this way:

You need to burn a certain amount of BTUs to heat the home, that's a given.

In order to get those BTUs, you have to have a certain temperature of water in the system.

I did quick calc and given the square footage of your home, I estimated the heat loss at right around 40K BTUH. That might be a bit on the low side though depending on exactly how far above the 49th you live. but I digress...

So we'll use 40K BTUH for discussion purposes.

You have roughly 100 feet of fin-tube baseboard which is rated for about 600 BTUH per lineal foot AT 180F Average water temperature.

That's 60K BTUH at 180F...

You don't need 60K though, only 40K, and THAT output occurs with 150-160F water in the system.

Theoretically then, presuming you have a 40K heat loss, your boiler and baseboards should be able to maintain a comfortable temperature in the home on the coldest days. This also means that on those coldest days the boiler would be running non-stop because it's OUTPUT matches the LOSS from the home.

So, NO MATTER THE COST, you need at least 155-ish water temps to heat the home.

Any time the weather is warmer than your DESIGN CONDITIONS, the boiler will 'cruise'... and may not even hit the high temperature setting before the thermostats are satisfied. Maybe a heat call comes along, the boiler begins to heat the water and circulate it, and by the time the water gets to 140, the thermostat satisfies and the boiler shuts down for a time until the next heat call.

Now, what you PAY for are BTUs in the form of electricity usage. Since electric heat is basically 100% efficient, meaning that you pay for what you use and none of that goes up a chimney, whether the boiler is at 150 or 140 or 170, you will only pay for the BTUs that you need.

That's the long answer...

The short answer is that you should not see a drastic increase in your bill by setting a higher limit on the boiler temp because setting it to a lower temp will mean that it runs longer... higher temp and it will run, shut off, run, shut off... and the NET RESULT will be more or less a 'wash'.
 
  #21  
Old 01-06-14, 07:27 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Mike, I've never thought about Outdoor Reset for an electric boiler... I wonder if that would make sense? Since there's no flue gas to worry about condensing, FULL reset could be done.
 
  #22  
Old 01-06-14, 07:35 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
Mike, I've never thought about Outdoor Reset for an electric boiler... I wonder if that would make sense? Since there's no flue gas to worry about condensing, FULL reset could be done.

yes I was thinking that too... have not had time to find the manual to breeze through it...

Funny our last two posts were similar info.....
 
  #23  
Old 01-06-14, 07:40 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Funny our last two posts were similar info....
Yep, you know what they say! Something about great minds...

I'm not even sure how one would go about connecting ODR to an electric boiler though...

We kinda got off track on the original problem though, didn't we?

Or was it decided that it was a thermostat issue?
 
  #24  
Old 01-07-14, 01:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay, sorry for the delay in responding. But sleep, work, ect.

But, we have an update.

Everything is up and running.

Boiler temp is sitting at about 70C (158F).
Pressure is at 125kPa.

During all of this discussion last night, the temperature was floating around 26.5C (80F).

I set the temp on the thermostat to 19C (66F)- we like the house cool [no setbacks of scheduling yet, I want to get it working first]. I opened up the doors, windows everything on the opposite side of the house to help cool down the house (didn't want the air flow to be detected greatly by the thermostat and skew the results. It managed to drop the temp to about 22C (71F)- over a 7 hour period.

Since we all left for work, we closed everything up, assuming the house would slowly cool throughout the day today. Instead, the temp begun to climb again. I came home and the house is back up to 24.5C (76F). All of the heaters are warm to the touch, but don't seem to be throwing heat (I also have the shutter closed on the heaters). The outside temp has dropped to about -20C (-5F), yet the temp seems to still be climbing.

At this point, in the past I would typically turn the boiler down. I am hoping you guys may have some suggestions, before I jump back to doing that.
 
  #25  
Old 01-07-14, 02:51 PM
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 36
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This sure sounds like there might be a wiring issue with how the third zone was disconnected from the system.

Divine, I notice you've had the cover off before, so I take it you are comfortable with electricity? Don't touch anything but can you take a picture of the control board inside the unit? Both with the thermostat turned to a low temperature such that the boiler should be off and then with it turned up where it should be on. I'm curious to see what lights are illuminated. Make sure you keep track of which picture is which.

To the experts: would it be possible for the circulator to create enough pressure to push open the zone valves and create flow through the system? My thought is that the end switches are not wired properly causing a constant request for operation.

Patrick
 
  #26  
Old 01-07-14, 03:03 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
OK, let's retreat and regroup...

What make/model are the zone valves? Looks like two different types?

Let's make sure they are actually closing and shutting off the heat flow.

Turn both t'stats all the way down. Operate the manual open lever on the valves. You should feel some resistance (move it slowly) and hear the gears 'whirring' inside as you open it manually. If the t'stat is all the way down and the lever is LOOSE with no resistance, that valve is not closed.

Have a helper turn up each thermostat in turn and listen for the whirring of the valve opening. When the valve is open, the manual lever should be loose. Check same for closing of the valve. When t'stat is turned all the way down you should hear the whirring of the valve closing.

Check that both valves appear to open and close properly.

==============

Are the thermostats mounted on an interior wall? In the wall behind the t'stats, is there a hole where the cool air inside the wall can affect the accuracy of the t'stat? If so, use something to plug that hole, whatever it takes, caulk, insulation, duct tape, anything that will stop the flow of cool air into the t'stat.

==============

When both zone valves are [supposed to be] closed, does the red circulating pump turn OFF? You should be able to tell by feeling for some slight vibration.

==============

Are there any lights or other indications on the boiler that it is actually turning OFF when both t'stats are turned all the way down?

We'll get to the bottom of this but it's gonna take some observations....
 
  #27  
Old 01-07-14, 03:08 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
To the experts: would it be possible for the circulator to create enough pressure to push open the zone valves and create flow through the system?
Yes but I dont think thats the issue since the house is getting way above setpoint...

Here is the manual... There are troubleshoooting steps that need to be followed to find any issues...

I breezed through it very very quick and a possible faulty temp sensor caught my eye but not sure...

I need to read through it some...

Dont have a lot of time now... Doing homework with the kiddies....

Troop???





http://www.lionboilers.com/CEB%20Manual.pdf
 
  #28  
Old 01-07-14, 03:32 PM
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 36
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
lawrosa,

I think it will be telling to see if the thermostat light is on all the time. If the system is not calling for heat, I don't think that the pump should be running, and if its not running, the elements *should* not be heating up.

Patrick
 
  #29  
Old 01-07-14, 03:46 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Patrick... great minds at work again... you and I were thinking along the same lines when I posted my list of things to check... you posted while I was composing!

Yes but I dont think thats the issue since the house is getting way above setpoint...
Unless the pump is miswired and running all the time... why I asked about the pump running in my list of things to check.

Troop???
On it... thanks for finding the manual! I'm sure the kids will get straight "A's" with you helping them!
 
  #30  
Old 01-07-14, 03:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
kayakingphotos:

Here are three pictures;

Name:  boiler turned all the way down.jpg
Views: 1331
Size:  46.5 KB


Name:  At temp.jpg
Views: 1277
Size:  49.2 KB


Name:  adjusting to set temp.jpg
Views: 1344
Size:  48.1 KB


No lights, boiler is turned all the way down.
One light, boiler is heating up.
Two lights, boiler is at temp.


It can be hard to see, just to the left of the gray wires, and above the red. Had to use flash because it is a bit dark.

Lights stayed the same regardless of thermostat setting.

NJ Trooper:

Name:  2014-01-07 19.23.56.jpg
Views: 1215
Size:  27.3 KB

The first Erie valve is capped off.

===
Both thermostats are on interior walls, and a decent distance away from an outside wall. I recently did renovations near the new thermostat which included opening up the wall that it is on, there are no air leaks. Nor is it near a window or anything. It is two walls away from an outside wall.

The new thermostat I replaced, I actually went a little crazy and bought a Nest thermostat- so I could keep track and make sure it was reporting the proper temperature. Oh, and I had a FutureShop gift card that helped pay for it
===

The boiler seems kind of dumb in a way. No lights or anything on the boiler itself seems to alter when changing thermostat settings.

For your testing of the valves and circulating pumps, I am waiting for my wife to get home to help me with the testing.

Everyone: A friend suggested that perhaps there is an airlock in the pipes. Not sure if this is possibly part of the issue or not. Just throwing it out there.

I wanted to thank everyone giving help so far!
 

Last edited by NJT; 01-07-14 at 04:14 PM.
  #31  
Old 01-07-14, 03:52 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 27
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
lawrosa,

I think it will be telling to see if the thermostat light is on all the time. If the system is not calling for heat, I don't think that the pump should be running, and if its not running, the elements *should* not be heating up.

Patrick
This is quite telling. With the current settings, thermostats off (down all the way), the wall heaters are always warm to the touch. This should not be the case, correct?
 
  #32  
Old 01-07-14, 04:17 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Well... I have to say that it's not the first time I've seen CAT5 cable used for thermostat and valve wiring...

A friend suggested that perhaps there is an airlock in the pipes
You can dismiss that idea. If there was an airlock you would have NO heat.

I'm going to spend some qualtime with the manual for a bit to see if I can come up with some clues.
 
  #33  
Old 01-07-14, 04:18 PM
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 36
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I sure hope that the computer network cable in your boiler is not hooked up to your computer!!!!!

If the thermostats are off, there should be no heat in the wall heaters (well, it may take some time to cool down, but they should get cold eventually)

One of the experts here should be able to walk you through how it SHOULD be wired into the zone valves. I don't do too much with residential stuff. My boiler at work is about the size of a school bus....

Patrick
 
  #34  
Old 01-07-14, 04:24 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Please understand that the following comments may, or may not, have any bearing on the problem at hand, they are observations as I read through the manual...

Right off the bat:

Pump Installation

The circulation pump should be positioned as close to the boiler as possible, with the delivery arranged to pump out of the tank outlet on the upper left side of the boiler (see Fig. 3)
so that's clearly wrong.

What direction IS the pump pumping? There should be an arrow on the pump body. Since it's on the other pipe it should be pumping TOWARD the boiler.
 
  #35  
Old 01-07-14, 04:25 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
The pump is powered by the boiler through terminals PL and PN located on the 120 volt
terminal block (lower right terminal block see Fig. 4 and Fig. 5). The pump starts when
the thermostat terminals on the control board are closed, and stops when these terminals
are opened.
DO NOT go sticking your hands in there, but see if you can SAFELY! check to see if the pump is wired to the indicated terminals.
 
  #36  
Old 01-07-14, 04:33 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Standard practice is to install safety relief valves with the stem VERTICAL as clearly shown in the manual (and in instructions from valve manufacturers). We can see that yours is not.

Also, it does not appear that there is an air vent installed on the top of the boiler as shown. There IS one on the air scoop, but the manufacturer wants one on top of the boiler as well and I can't see in the pictures that there is one.

 
  #37  
Old 01-07-14, 04:40 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
The circuit board in your unit is different than the one shown in the manual.

The one in the manual shows that there is an LED next to the thermostat inputs that shows when the thermostat (or zone valves in this case) are calling for heat.

Does one of the LEDs on your board indicate when there is a heat call? or are there only the three you've described?
 
  #38  
Old 01-07-14, 04:42 PM
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 36
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have a stupid question......

Is the little lever on the left zone valve hooked into the manual position???? It looks like its angled off to the left and the one in the middle is towards the right....

Patrick
 
  #39  
Old 01-07-14, 04:49 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I have a stupid question......
No you don't!

That's an EXCELLENT question!

With Honeywell valves it wouldn't matter because manually opening the valves does not trip the 'endswitch' and call the boiler to fire... but I believe that on the ERIE valves it DOES. That could well be the problem right there!
 
  #40  
Old 01-07-14, 04:49 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 123
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Out in left field....
The third zone valve...is it still wired to the system? Could someone have put that into manual mode, and thus the end switch is telling the system to run continuously? Maybe with the circulator running, hot water is leaking thru the other zone valves (somehow). A high limit keeps the system from overheating, yet the system never really shuts down. Could this be why the t-stat has no apparent function?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: