Relocating Boiler Question

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  #1  
Old 01-14-14, 09:11 PM
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Relocating Boiler Question

For starters, I am in a flood zone and my home flooded back in 2011. Since I am in a flood zone I have to carry flood insurance and the basement had to be made unfinishable which meant it was partially filled in when the house was built.

So I have about 5 feet of a "crawlspace" and that is where my boiler currently is. The boiler is about 2 years old because I had it replaced when we flooded. Anyway, the reason for me thinking about relocating it is because the laws for flood insurance rates just changed and my rates skyrocketed. They are counting me as a full basement because my partially filled in basement isn't filled in enough (need about 4 more inches filled in for about 1400 square feet).

BUT, I think that if I can get the boiler out of the crawlspace they don't have to count that as my lowest level and that should help my premiums a TON. So I was wondering how hard/what the cost would be to relocate it. I have two options that I can think of as far as a new location.

The first is where the access is to get to the basement. There is about a 6-7 foot hallway that has a plywood door to get down to the crawlspace so I was thinking it could be put at the back end of that hallway and I could make the opening to the basement smaller. The rough distance the boiler would have to be moved would be about 12 feet one way, about 8-10 feet another way and then about 5 feet up.

The second option is to move it to my garage which is basically just on the other side of the wall/foundation. I say foundation because about 3-4 feet of foundation can be seen in the garage (behind the drywall). My concern here is going through the foundation with the pipes (if that is even legal) and then on top of that the garage is unheated and uninsulated and I live in Upstate NY.

Any thoughts or suggestions for an inexpensive way to relocate the boiler?
 
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Old 01-15-14, 01:12 AM
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A few dozen clear, well-lit and in focus pictures of the existing location along with the proposed locations would help us to help you. I don't think we need any close-up pictures, at least not yet, but we DO need to see how the various parts are connected and what the surrounding area looks like.

Best to upload the pictures to a photo-hosting site and then post the public URL for the album as the forum software often does funny things to directly posted pictures.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 05:08 AM
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Ok, well after thinking a little more I can't really do the garage because that still puts it below the Base Flood Elevation so the effort wouldn't be worth it. If I can get it to the main floor of the house, nothing will be below the BFE anymore and that should reduce the rate drastically.

Here are a few pictures. I tried to get one zoom out so you could get a better idea on the distance and you can just barely see the bottom of the steps on the left. The one picture of that closet is where I am thinking the boiler could go.
Boiler Location Photos by ceebee94z | Photobucket
 
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Old 01-15-14, 06:28 AM
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You may have venting issues when you move it... That is the main concern...

You may be best to build an outside utility shed to house the boiler...

The closet will need air openings for combustion cut into the walls or floor...

Again venting is the main issue....
 
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Old 01-15-14, 06:52 AM
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Hmmm, this sounds like it might be more expensive than I was hoping. I don't think building an out-building would do me much good either unless I elevated the building to be about the BFE. Not to mention there really isn't a "good" place to put something that wouldn't be an eye sore.

Maybe having the basement filled a bit more is going to be the easiest option.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 06:58 AM
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Hmmm, this sounds like it might be more expensive than I was hoping.
Is the garage attached?? That may be best.. Put up on blocks.. But you will need a lolly column per code...

What are you really saving on flood insurance moving it?

If its a lot then a small outhouse/shed to house the boiler is a cheaper alternative IMO...
 
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Old 01-15-14, 07:06 AM
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Is the garage attached?? That may be best.. Put up on blocks.. But you will need a lolly column per code...

What are you really saving on flood insurance moving it?

If its a lot then a small outhouse/shed to house the boiler is a cheaper alternative IMO...

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...#ixzz2qTncsA2y
The garage is "attached" but not really. There is no access from the garage to the house, it is basically just pushed up against the house. So really the garage isn't part of the house at all. It is on a slab and the slab is about 3-4 feet below the top of the foundation. It is a really weird setup.

Right now my flood insurance went from $1400 a year to $3000 a year. If I get the basement filled in some more so the height is less than 5 feet, the premium goes back down to the $1400ish number. Baesd on my understanding, if I relocate the boiler so it is above the BFE, then I might be able to save even more and get the premium below the $1400 number but I have my insurance agent looking in to that.

So if I put it in the garage, I wouldn't have to lolly column it since the garage is on a slab. And the rough estimate that I have for the fill delivered is about $500.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 08:55 AM
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I wouldn't have to lolly column it since the garage is on a slab
The column isn't for support, it's to keep vehicles from running into the boiler.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 09:39 AM
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The column isn't for support, it's to keep vehicles from running into the boiler.
Haha, thanks for the clarification. Shows you how much I know I guess.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 08:44 PM
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Maybe I am reading this incorrectly but if all you need to do is raise the "floor" of the crawlspace another four inches to qualify for the lower insurance rate then moving the boiler to the left so that the air intake and exhaust vent were in the same joist cavity where they exit the house and then installing a "housekeeping pad" on the new floor should qualify. This would raise the base of the boiler maybe six to ten inches from where it is now and still allow for maintenance.

How high did the flood water reach, or has it never flooded but is just in the flood plain?
 
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