Smith boiler question

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Old 03-22-14, 10:35 AM
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Smith boiler question

Hello-- I have Smith boiler Model GB100-W-5 cond. Does the cond mean that it is a condensing boiler? The manual does not mention anything regarding that.
Thanks in advance for any information.
 
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Old 03-22-14, 11:58 AM
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I don't know what the ' cond ' means, but I can tell you that it does NOT mean ' condensing '. The GB100 series is conventional cast iron boiler.
 
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Old 03-22-14, 12:56 PM
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Smith boiler question

Thank you Trooper, I did not really believe that it was a condensing boiler. The manual states that the aquastat is a Honeywell L4080B1253B, however it is actually a 1212B. It has never been replaced.
How accurate are aquastats, mine will turn the boiler on at the the high limit setting.
 
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Old 03-22-14, 04:05 PM
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How accurate are aquastats, mine will turn the boiler on at the the high limit setting.
They aren't terribly accurate, as long as the action is REPEATABLE at the same temperature every time is what's really important.

What do you mean ? " ... will turn the boiler on at the high limit setting ... " ?
 
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Old 03-23-14, 05:17 AM
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You are correct it is repeatable---the aquastat high limit is set for 170 - the burner shuts off at 188 the circulator keeps running to satisfy the call for heat, then the burner kicks back in at about 178 which is the the proper differential.
 
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Old 03-23-14, 09:39 AM
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There are also other possibilities to consider:

1. The sensing probe of the aquastat is not fully inserted into the immersion well, and/or the immersion well is too large for the probe.

1. The thermometer itself is not accurate.

2. The actual physical position of the thermometer and the aquastat could well be sensing different water temperatures.
 
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Old 03-23-14, 11:23 AM
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Smith boiler question

I pulled the aquastat and noted that the tip of sensing probe was about 4 inches from the mounting collar. The immersion well measures 6 and 1/4 inches deep. I extended the probe and put a dab of heat sink grease on the tip and reinstalled it. The temp readings are now closer to specs.

Now that I am currently fixated on heating system issues I've become sensitive to any little issue. In the early morning when the boiler is on I can hear the sound of water running through the pipes; however once the house heats up the sound is gone. Is this normal or is air getting sucked into the system during the night. There isn't any signs of leakage. I will turn off the water supply to check.
 
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Old 03-23-14, 12:00 PM
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I would say that the first thing is to make sure you've got the correct pressure in the system, keeping in mind that the majority of boiler gauges are junk.

Read this:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...ure-gauge.html

It's good practice to check and charge the air in expansion tank as explained in this post (presuming you've got that type of expansion tank):

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...sion-tank.html

Take a bunch of clear, well-lighted pics of your boiler and the pipes and valves around it and we'll maybe be able to give you some pointers on other maintenance items you can do.
 
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Old 03-23-14, 01:50 PM
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Smith boiler question

Trooper:> I had replaced the combination temp/press gauge with a conventional (liquid filled) thermometer and a separate pressure gauge. I installed the old combo gauge on the return side. The pressure on the both gauges is the very close. The expansion tank is a Wellxtrol Model 110; the pressure was only 6 lbs, it has been increased to 12 lbs. I believe all is good for now. Thank you so much for your help and guidance.
 
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Old 03-23-14, 01:59 PM
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The expansion tank is a Wellxtrol Model 110
That's not exactly the correct tank for a heating system. The name "WELLxtrol" says that it is for potable water well service. Not that it won't work, but depending on the particular specifications on that tank, it may, or may not, be rated for the TEMPERATURE of water it will see.

How long has it been installed?

About the air in the system that you are hearing... do you have an AIR REMOVAL DEVICE on your system? That's one of the things I was going to look for in pictures.
 
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Old 03-24-14, 11:36 AM
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Smith boiler question

Duh! I meant to type Filltrol and I replaced it last May because the old one was 35 years old and the pressure regulator was seized.

I just replaced the old Maid o' Mist air vent with an Amtrol 700-30

How long does it take for dissolved gases to dissipate from boiler water?
 
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