What is this neutralizer for?

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Old 03-26-14, 10:51 AM
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What is this neutralizer for?

I do volunteer work with a small non-profit history museum that recently restored a 1754 house. The work included installation of an Alpine 285 boiler. One of the zone return lines has a neutralizer attached as shown in the pictures below. The valves to the neutralizer are closed and the bypass valve between them on the return line is open. The neutralizer feels as though it is empty (it is actually being supported by the piping and is "floating" about 1/8 inch above the floor.)

What would this be for? Does it have anything to do with the Alpine or is it just for system piping? After initial system fill and presumably neutralization should it be valved off as it is? The system is on good quality municipal water.

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 03-26-14, 11:25 AM
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Are you referring to the "pot feeder", the blue cylindrical tank on the left of the first picture as a "neutralizer? The pot feeder is to add chemical treatment to the system. It matters not that it is in the single loop as it will eventually become mixed with the water of the entire system. If you are not using it to add chemicals it may be left valved off.

If you want to know how to add chemicals via the pot feeder I can detail the steps, what I cannot do is tell you what chemicals may be needed.

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Old 03-26-14, 05:18 PM
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The Alpine should, however, have a neutralizer connected to the condensate drain. Condensation from flue gasses is quite acidic. A neutralizer will bring the PH to an acceptable level so as not to eat away the drain pipe that the condensate dumps into.
 
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Old 03-27-14, 09:24 AM
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Thanks, Furd, that's what i thought.

As poorplmbr notes the condensate line should have a neutralizer. There is one installed as required to protect the drain piping.
 
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Old 03-27-14, 10:26 AM
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2john is it possible the restoration was done in phases, and the boiler was installed while the house was on well water? And chemical treatment was only needed for the well water? Then the conversion was done from well to municipal water?

Just a WAG!LOL If not . never mind!

Good luck!
 
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