black pipe to copper?

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Old 05-09-14, 12:43 PM
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black pipe to copper?

Been a while since Ive done actual black pipe boiler work.

In one of my apartments there is drop ceiling. I can raise it about a foot (which it NEEDS) but would need to lift a black hot water heat pipe up as well. No biggy to me. I was curious though If I could just swap it with copper for ease.

I cant remember if this is doable. Its a 1" black pipe. Its for my second floor. The first floor has the same boiler and is all copper. The second floor is all black pipe with old radiators.

Thanks
 
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Old 05-09-14, 05:18 PM
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Some people believe that copper should not be connected to steel pipe. But, it's done all the time, successfully, by experienced plumbers.
 
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Old 05-09-14, 06:01 PM
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You could also replace the black steel with the appropriately sized oxygen barrier PEX.
 
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Old 05-12-14, 09:09 AM
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I was thinking of Pex but not so sure. I have the cinch tool and have used it a ton already but still something about leaving in a rental where hot water will be above a tenants cieling makes me want to stick with at least copper.

I actually followed the pipes further back and there is already copper installed elsewhere. If it wasnt so espensive Id just replace it all. I want to actualy rip this boiler out and place forced hot air in that level.
 
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Old 05-13-14, 03:43 PM
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It being a rental would have me more inclined to do it in steel.
 
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Old 05-13-14, 05:01 PM
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Perhaps a risk for Pex or copper is that a nail can easily puncture it, particularly if it is in concealed areas. Not sure, but maybe this is a greater risk in rental units?

In case of frozen pipes, copper will easily split longitudinally - and when it thaws, it may cause a flood.

Many soldered copper joints show that telltale green streaking, indicative of leaking. Some such copper joints seem to start leaking, at least noticeably, long after the joint was initially made. It seems like steel connections, if initially leak-free, stay leak free.

Steel pipe run along the basement joists can safely be used as coat-hanger rods.
 
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Old 05-14-14, 10:15 AM
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And people don't tend to rip out black iron piping for scrap metal money...
 
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Old 05-29-14, 12:00 PM
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I dont think anyone is ripping this out for cash.

I think Im going to run PEX actually.

I followed the feed/return all the way to the boiler and its such a mish mosh of pipe. It runs out of the boiler feed and return as 1" copper then fixes into the 1-1/4" black then branches off that to 1" for each radiiator on the floor.

Im ripping it all the way to the copper at the boiler and doing 1" pex and cinch. If it begin at 1" and runs for like 20 feet that way there should not be an issue with removing the 30 of 1-1/4 and reducing it.

I think it used to be an old steam system that was converted to hot water. The house was an old victorian single split into a 4 unit at who knows when.

I will be able to actually lift 2 ceiling this way and then Ill just scrap the black for some money back.
You guys should see the amount of dead black and cast Im ripping out of these cielings.
I also re ran about 30' of main stack drain in PVC from cast to move it up higher so thats getting scrapped as well.

Ive done lots of pex (up to 3/4) in the past and its great stuff. At only around 20-25 psi in the winter running I should not have an issue. A portion of my own boiler was replaced with pex and I completely forgot about it.

thanks
 
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Old 05-29-14, 12:43 PM
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Not sure if you are aware of this or not... Furd mentioned it earlier... but PEX used for boiler systems needs to be of a special type with the oxygen barrier. PEX used for potable water systems does not have the O2 barrier.
 
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Old 05-30-14, 05:08 AM
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yes I am aware thanks.

I always use the OB for heat. I found a great site that wholesales pex stuff (dont know if im allowed to post a link).
 
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