double pass baseboard adjustment (2 parallel 1/2" copper tubes)

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Old 05-14-14, 11:34 AM
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double pass baseboard adjustment (2 parallel 1/2" copper tubes)

My son has double pass { 2 parallel 1/2" tubes} hot water baseboard with control valves on each side. There appears to be one adjustment screw on the top of each . The house has one zone and is not well balanced. Am I opening up a can of worms in attempting to adjust these and what would be the correct way to adjust them? Thanks
 
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Old 05-14-14, 12:05 PM
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Post some pictures of these "control valves" please. Also pictures of the entire heater.
 
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Old 05-14-14, 03:29 PM
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here are the pic's , I hope. the house is about 60 years old.
 
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Old 05-14-14, 04:01 PM
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Those are not adjustments. The top picture (right hand side of unit) is an air vent and the one on the left hand side is just a pipe plug. There is no adjustment to vary the flow through one tube in comparison to the other tube.
 
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Old 05-14-14, 04:12 PM
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Thanks for sharing your knowledge, I guess it was wishful thinking,
 
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Old 05-14-14, 04:22 PM
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Yeah, what Furd said...........

Thing is, in answer to your question:

Am I opening up a can of worms in attempting to adjust these...
I wouldn't call it a can of worms, but even if they WERE valves that you could adjust to vary the flow, attempting to 'balance' a heating system by varying flow in the various branches is often a waste of time. It's almost an impossible thing to do.

When a heating system is designed, the process is supposed to be that the designer calculates (estimates) the heat loss of each room and then specifies the correct amount of baseboard to counter the heat loss.

The amount of baseboard must be consistent relative to the heat loss throughout the home in order to be balanced.

Sad fact is that in the 'olden days' they would simply slap the stuff in from wall to wall with no regard to heat loss in each room. The result was usually some rooms too cool, some rooms too warm, and Goldilocks wasn't happy.

One thing that you can try that is cheap and easy is if you have rooms that are too warm, take some heavy duty aluminum foil and cover portions of the finned elements to decrease the heat output in those rooms. You'll have to experiment to find the correct amount to cover...
 
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Old 05-14-14, 11:02 PM
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Heat might be uneven because those air bleeders haven't been touched in ages. Count up all the bad ones. That is project #1 to replace them.
 
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