Cast Iron baseboard question


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Old 06-27-14, 10:56 AM
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Cast Iron baseboard question

Hello -

I have a 1950s original powder room that I'm looking to remodel. I'm thinking about tiling over the existing ceramic tile.

One question I have is related to the baseboard heating. I have the old cast iron baseboard radiators (looks like this - Snug Baseboard | Weil-McLain | Product Detail). Right now, there is approximately 1" of clearance between the top of the opening on the bottom and the floor. If I tile over the tile, that gap will be decreased.

Does anyone know if this will be an issue with airflow through the baseboard heater, etc.? Don't want to do this and have issues later.

Thanks for the input
 
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Old 06-27-14, 06:21 PM
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How much will the gap be reduced? If by only 1/4" or so, I wouldn't expect an issue.

Do you have access to the piping in a basement below the powder room? You may determine that it's possible to jack up the radiator and slide the new tile underneath.

But faced with a similar situation, I removed the existing tile and then installed the replacement tile over the original subfloor. That approach avoids other problems too - such as butting up against the toilet, walls, etc.
 
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Old 06-29-14, 08:55 AM
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such as butting up against the toilet, walls, etc.
Not to mention the added height of the floor... which seems at first glance to be a trivial matter, but you WILL notice it when you enter the room, believe it or not. I know 3/8" doesn't seem like much but your feet will 'find' it.
 
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Old 06-29-14, 04:55 PM
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Not to mention the added height of the floor...
Also, if the powder room door opens into the powder room, the door's bottom may need to be trimmed.

As Trooper mentioned, there will be a height discontinuity between the floors or the powder room and the adjacent hallway. They make transition strips for this, but it may then be a trip hazard. We encountered this when removing the wall-to-wall carpet in our living room, exposing the nice hardwood floor underneath. The top of the carpet was originally even with the quarry tile hallway, but afterwards, we had a 1/2" offset.

How about the vanity? Powder room closet door, if any?

If, as I assume, there is a toilet in the powder room, you can keep the original plumbing and butt up the new tile to the stool base - but then there will be an unsightly joint. Yes, you could caulk or grout the joint, but then how to you pull the stool base for future maintenance or replacement?

If you extend the new tile under the toilet, then the Johnny Ring will be too low, and have to be replaced somehow. And then there is the potential issue of the toilet hold-down studs.

Of all places, a bath is perhaps the least desirable room to raise the floor elevation. An alternative is to rip out the whole powder room and upgrade it from the studs on out - new sink, floor, vanity, lighting, etc. That's what we did with an upstairs bath. We never disturbed the cast-iron baseboard unit - just shimmed it in place above the original subfloor, and tiled underneath it.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 08:36 AM
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The door opens out, but either way, there would be enough room on the bottom where I wouldn't have to trim it. Right now there's a marble divider (not sure that's what it's called) in between the two rooms.

I'm remodeling the vanity and toilet as well, so everything will be clear in the room when I'm laying the new tile. I was thinking a toilet flange extender to accommodate the new 1/4" height of the floor.

I do go back and forth about doing this or just ripping everything up. However, the ripping everything out option requires me to go through multiple inches of old 1950s mud and tile. not a fun job.

If there's no issues with the baseboard gap, I'm probably willing to deal with the slight elevation of floors between the rooms.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 05:26 PM
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However, the ripping everything out option requires me to go through multiple inches of old 1950s mud and tile. not a fun job.
That's exactly what I ran into, and Yes, not a fun job. Rigging a slide from the second-floor bathroom to carry out the debris into a dumpster. Now, I'm glad I did that, because it winds up with a better job. But if you are not really up to it, then do whatever makes sense to you. Perfection is not always practical.
 
 

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