Cast Iron Boiler and leaving it shut-off during the summer. Bad idea?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-23-14, 11:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cast Iron Boiler and leaving it shut-off during the summer. Bad idea?

My oil service tech came over to perform the yearly cleaning on my oil boiler. He has told me from day one that he hates this boiler. I figured he was just trying to sell me a new boiler. His finding shows the boiler condensing and had severe rust inside. The combination of soot, rust and condensation has left alot of "gunk" inside the boiler.

It has an outside air kit and is shut off during the summer. Chimney pulls like a freight train so I'm guessing the damp, humid air is pulled through the boiler up the flue and the condensation has deteriorated the boiler to the point where it's time to replace.

For a replacement, I'm looking at a weil meclain Ultra. Does anyone know if they have a low limit built in so I can maintain boiler temp say ....100 deg. during the summer and prevent condensing?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-23-14, 01:03 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,809
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
His finding shows the boiler condensing and had severe rust inside.
Most likley that was cause by low return temps. If so some type of boiler protection like a boiler bypass will most likely fix that issue..

Why you want the boiler to burn during the summer is not the answer.

How do you heat the hot water?
What type of heat emitters in the home? ( Cast iron rads? Copper finned baseboard?)

Answer this and we can guide you.

Also take a few well lit pics of your boiler and post back here..

Last I would stay away from weil mclain IMO..

( There may be nothing wrong with your boiler and the sections can probably be cleaned up. I say this because of this statement.)

Chimney pulls like a freight train
Again you most likely have low flue temps and any boiler you install will do the same.

We will await your response and other pros will chime in to mention anything I missed...
 
  #3  
Old 07-23-14, 03:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
There's no boiler protection so yes, low water return temps are a concern but I don't think I can put a bypass in with my setup. Hence a new boiler that can maintain 100 degF when not calling for heat.

Hot water is heated by an electric hybrid water heater.

Heat emmiters: Hydro-air FCU's.

I'll post pics soon.
 
  #4  
Old 07-23-14, 04:39 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,809
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
but I don't think I can put a bypass in with my setup.
Sure you can....

Hence a new boiler that can maintain 100 degF when not calling for heat.
Thats nonsense....


Heat emmiters: Hydro-air FCU's.
Not familiar. I did a search... It this a coil with a forced air system?

When the unit it running what are your boiler temps???
 
  #5  
Old 07-23-14, 05:36 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 62
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here's the oil boiler.




It's tied in parallel with the oil boiler.

 
  #6  
Old 07-24-14, 06:09 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 63
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Condensation is caused by low stack temp. Running the boiler in the summer will mean more condensation. More so if the low limit is only 100. And just a heads up you can change the aquastat to one with a low limit you don't need to change the boiler.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: