Questions about possible leaking oil tank. NJ

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Old 09-13-14, 12:27 PM
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Questions about possible leaking oil tank. NJ

I am told that you have posted valuable information about leaky oil tanks - I fear that I may have one. I am also a New Jersey resident and would be grateful for any advice.

How can I access your leaky oil tank posts?
 
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Old 09-13-14, 12:38 PM
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Oh my... I am feeling for ya...

What makes you believe your tank is leaking?
 
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Old 09-13-14, 01:30 PM
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The house was converted from oil to gas by the previous owner about 50 years ago - I don't know if is leaking but would like to find out without notifying the State about the result if it is a leaker. I believe that once the State is notified you have only 18 months to remove it and remediate the soil which can be very expensive. If it is a leaker I want more time to solve the problem and hope that the State will re-establish the remediation assistance fund.
 
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Old 09-13-14, 01:36 PM
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There are two threads running now with basically the same content. I don't believe Troop has seen this thread..... which is in the wrong place.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/we...est-leaks.html
 
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Old 09-13-14, 01:55 PM
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about 50 years ago
Say WHAT? You think they left it in the ground with oil still in it?

you have only 18 months to remove it and remediate the soil which can be very expensive
Not sure where you got the 18 month number from... but when mine leaked, it took them EIGHT YEARS to complete the remediation and the state was OK with that as long as the papers were all filed on time.

Here's a hint though...

NJ Supreme Court has ruled that the ground water is the property of the State of NJ.

Homeowner's insurance has to pay out on 3rd party liability insurance if a 3rd party can claim damages.

The STATE will be the 3rd party if the oil has contaminated ground water.

If it's a leaker, you better hope it went into the ground water or you'll be paying. (As environmentally unconscious as that makes me sound. I'm more a mercenary than a tree hugger.)
 
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Old 09-13-14, 01:58 PM
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This really doesn't seem the place for the topic either, but I don't think there IS an appropriate forum to discuss this!
 
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Old 09-13-14, 02:03 PM
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If it is a leaker I want more time to solve the problem
I don't understand...

The only way to 'solve the problem' if it is a leaker is to hire a State approved licensed contractor to remove the tank and contaminated soil.

In case anyone is curious, here's a small sampling of what someone with a leaking oil tank might be in for:

Oil Tank Remediation Photos

IN SITU Remediation July 2012
 

Last edited by NJT; 09-13-14 at 02:38 PM.
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Old 09-13-14, 06:20 PM
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I worked for a professional firm that was often called in to investigate environmental issues involving property transfers. But, I'm not a lawyer and am unfamiliar with NJ laws. However...

When you go to sell your house, an astute buyer or his attorney may suspect an abandoned oil tank, and demand that the seller provide assurance that it has been properly removed and remediated.

Real-estate transaction boilerplate may require the seller to disclose any known or suspected environmental issues. If it later turns out that the seller failed to disclose such issues, he might later be held responsible. (In such case, perhaps you would have a cause of action against the seller you bought the property from.)

Personally, I think you would be better off hiring a consultant to see if there is a problem. If there is a clean bill of health, then that would help you sell the property in the future. If there is a problem, then you could decide how to proceed.

If there is significant oil contamination from the tank, I suspect that sooner or later it will show up in adjacent properties.
 
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Old 09-13-14, 07:20 PM
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And as a plumber and concerns for septic care of leach fields I would ask what the Peroxide was used for?????

Sorry somewhat off topic...
 
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Old 09-13-14, 07:52 PM
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I think the easiest explanation is that the peroxide 'oxidizes' the oil schtuff and basically turns it into carbon dioxide and water. In effect, it burns it without burning it. There IS heat generated though, the stuff that bubbles up out of the adjacent vent wells is warm (certainly not HOT though).

It's a chemical reaction that produces non-toxic byproducts.

The peroxide is all 'used up' when the reaction is done. It doesn't last long in the environment or underground. There's no danger for leach fields (which were far away anyhow)
 
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Old 09-13-14, 08:32 PM
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It's a chemical reaction that produces non-toxic byproducts.

The peroxide is all 'used up' when the reaction is done. It doesn't last long in the environment or underground. There's no danger for leach fields (which were far away anyhow)
Ha ha.. Yes I understand that... Peroxide just turns to water basically..

I use it in septics all the time.Im wondering how its related to oil clean up???

I assume as with septics they want to oxygenate the soil is all??? Make it more porous?

Interesting they did not use a product exxon used in Alaska... Seeptic seep.. for hard pan soils from oil spills...

I will try to find the vid... But again dont want to get off topic...

Just wondering how they used the peroxide.......Injected?
 
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Old 09-13-14, 08:50 PM
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Not really that far off topic... no more than we already are... leaking oil tanks only marginally related to boilers!

I assume as with septics they want to oxygenate the soil is all??? Make it more porous?
No. The oil schtuff is a hydrocarbon chain. Peroxide is basically water with an extra oxygen attached. That extra Oxygen is 'loose' and would rather bond to the hydrogens in the oil. So it splits off and pull the hydrogen with it and forms water. Then the carbons that are left run off with some of the other loose oxygens to form carbon dioxide.

That's the majority of the reaction, but there's other reactions going on too... there has to be enough IRON in the soil also. If there's not, they have to add iron to the water that they dilute the peroxide with. The iron is a 'catalyst' that gets the reaction going by forming Hydroxyl free radicals... Which then just gobble up the oil crud. And the PH has to be just right also.

Yes, injected under pressure. There were about 12 wells in all, I think 8 were injection and 4 were 'vents'.

If you want to overwhelm yer Brainiac go ahead and google "Fenton's Reagent" ... but be prepared to have yer Brainiac oxidized.
 
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Old 09-14-14, 02:37 AM
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Well Ill be a monkeys uncle!!!!! Geez I have some reading to do...

Fenton's Reagent Definition Page

And info about peroxide..

http://www.aquamerik.com/catalogue/p...&type=b&lg=eng
 
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Old 09-14-14, 04:53 AM
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Say WHAT? You think they left it in the ground with oil still in it?
I'm going to go out on a limb and say that it happens all of the time. I personally know of two that were. One of which was taken out years after abandonment.
 
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Old 09-14-14, 08:32 AM
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I don't think you'd be that far out Droo... I too know of at least one, and possibly two tanks that were abandoned with oil in them. But ... they didn't know then what we know now, and our Gov't was not overwhelmed by as many money hungry lawyers and environmentalists.
 
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