Does this nozzle / combustion chamber need service?

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Old 09-20-14, 01:43 PM
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Does this nozzle / combustion chamber need service?

Fall is here, getting ready for the snow, wondering, can I go one more season before getting someone in to service my Viking Junior combustion chamber and nozzle?

(Sorry for the iphone picture)
 
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Old 09-20-14, 01:57 PM
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Burner should be serviced yearly.
 
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Old 09-20-14, 02:59 PM
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Thanks NJ Trooper,

Should I expect them to change that combustion chamber too in the state it is, or just clean and service the burner?

I have only had a furnace/boiler etc for 1 year, before this I always lived in a place where was provided. I found a small, local, family run oil supplier and furnace repair company that I am switching to for this season. Knowing what to expect so I am not starting blind would be appreciated.
 
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Old 09-20-14, 03:20 PM
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As long as those cracks are only 'superficial' and the thing is not in danger of falling apart, I would say that it's fine.

They should brush and vacuum the heat exchanger and combustion chamber area, new nozzle, adjust electrodes, check screen in fuel pump (if it has one), change oil filters, adjust combustion (preferably NOT 'by eye', but with instruments, although with that old boiler, as long as they get the 'smoke' down to a manageable level, there isn't much more they can do with the instruments really)

You probably have an overhead steel expansion tank and that should probably be checked to make sure it's not waterlogged.

Probably other stuff I can't think of at the moment.
 
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Old 09-20-14, 03:28 PM
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If you have the older 3-piece circulator pump with oil ports, put two (only) drops of oil in the ports. Use electric motor oil (available at hardware stores), not garden-variety fine machine oil listed for fishing reels, bicycles, etc.

When the service person comes, try to be there and see what he does.
 
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Old 09-20-14, 03:53 PM
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Good catch Gil! Didn't even think about the pump.

put two (only) drops of oil in the ports.
Yes, on the MOTOR bearings... which obviously are the two on each end of the motor... but the impeller/bearing housing can take more... sometimes a couple teaspoons full.

The BURNER MOTOR might have oil ports too, most of the older ones do. A few drops in each. Sometimes it's not a 'flip-cap' but a small plastic plug that needs to be pulled.
 
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Old 09-21-14, 06:30 AM
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Thank you very much NJ Trooper and Gilmorrie,
I think the burner was changed a few years ago, but the house was empty for almost 2 years before I bought and I did not have it serviced my first year in, so I took the advice and have left a a message asking for a service call before the heating season starts up.

Is this consider a good burner?
Even though the actual boiler must be about 50 years old.
 
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Old 09-21-14, 08:12 AM
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Many people consider the Riello burners to be one of the best. German Engineering... I guess it's the BMW of oil burners.

I don't believe there are oil ports on that motor.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 08:24 AM
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The service call was completed today, the tech did not feel the combustion chamber needed replacing (thankfully).

He did replace the nozzle, filters and scrub the exchanger etc and sealed all the gaps with Pyro Seal etc.

He did recommend I consider changing the aquastat for no other reason than it is old and being proactive about changing it before it fails rather than waiting for a failure during the heating season to change it.
Any thoughts?

He lowered it from 170 to 160.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 01:25 PM
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I believe # 10 non detergent is the oil recommended.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 01:43 PM
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He did recommend I consider changing the aquastat for no other reason than it is old and being proactive about changing it before it fails rather than waiting for a failure during the heating season to change it. Any thoughts?
That's a tough call... On the one hand, he may just be trying to 'upsell' you using 'scare tactics'. On the other, I suppose it's a legit concern. I ask though, what will it be replaced with? Some new fangled electronic job? What are the odds the new one won't fail too?
 
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Old 10-02-14, 01:47 PM
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I believe it is made in Italy but may be German engineering I personally prefer them as nozzle change from 0.4 to 0.75 on the F4 is made with all the new settings made with out changing the flame retention head as required by other makes. Their one weakness is the motor bearings as they are ball bearings and in a damp basement they will fail due to the moisture being pulled through them. From what I can see from the picture the end cone looks like it is burned on its edge. This can happen if the fuel and air is too lean or too much air, if it is it needs to be changed as burner can not be adjusted properly . Many tecks who don't use all the test equipment end up with an improperly adjusted burner as they can not be set by eye the flame is too bright .
 
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Old 10-02-14, 01:57 PM
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I think you're right Saves... I don't know why I said German! Yes, Italian...

the first light oil burner is produced to be used in bakers’ ovens and for special applications.
Pizza anyone?

http://www.riello.com/history-and-mission

So, it's the Ferrari of oil burners then?
 
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Old 10-02-14, 07:17 PM
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Some new fangled electronic job? What are the odds the new one won't fail too?
My thoughts exactly.
Most of the things I have repaired around here are original or close to it and are all 50-70 years old and I am willing to bet what I replaced them with won't last 70 years!

The replacement part is 37 dollars, maybe I will just pick one up and keep it on the shelf until the day comes the old one fails.





saves

I believe it is made in Italy but may be German engineering I personally prefer them as nozzle change from 0.4 to 0.75 on the F4 is made with all the new settings made with out changing the flame retention head as required by other makes. Their one weakness is the motor bearings as they are ball bearings and in a damp basement they will fail due to the moisture being pulled through them. From what I can see from the picture the end cone looks like it is burned on its edge. This can happen if the fuel and air is too lean or too much air, if it is it needs to be changed as burner can not be adjusted properly . Many tecks who don't use all the test equipment end up with an improperly adjusted burner as they can not be set by eye the flame is too bright .
This guy had no test equipment at all.
He just unscrewed the old nozzle and put a new one in it's place. Should I be asking for senior tech to tweaking it?

I don't know how old that cone is, but given the history of the house, at very least, 3 or 4 years.


I really appreciate the education, this all completely new to me.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 09:30 PM
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They come with titanium end cones,thought it might be the picture or something.
 
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Old 10-03-14, 05:27 PM
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Should I be asking for senior tech to tweaking it?
There really isn't a whole lot of tweaking that will improve that style of boiler. It's pretty much just setting the air for a 'smoke spot' between a trace and a #1. In some cases it may not even go down to a #1 smoke...

So he should have at the VERY LEAST used a 'smoke spot gun' on it.

I doubt if one could get the CO2 above 10% ...

It's hard to tell anything from that picture of the burner head. I doubt it's burned though... I'm with Guyold, probably just the picture.
 
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Old 10-04-14, 08:01 AM
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So he should have at the VERY LEAST used a 'smoke spot gun' on it.


Thank you guys, learning a lot here.
The founder of the company still shows up at the office every day, but his son runs the shop on a day to day basis.
I will speak to him about the smoke spot gun evaluation.

He did look in my chimney and pointed out that you could still easily see the shine of the stainless steel of the liner, saying that it was a good sign.

I found a better picture of the cone from when I first bought the house last year. It appears to be in about the same shape today, could it be they had a bad winter and fixed the nozzle problem but left the "slightly" damaged cone in place? The tech who came (10 years experience he said) felt it was fine to leave it as is and check again after the next heating season.

My question is, does the damaged cone shorten the life of the combustion chamber?
 
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Old 10-04-14, 08:44 AM
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No the damaged end cone will not hurt chamber , just an indication of a poorly set up burner . The tubulator setting is not set to match nozzle.
 
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