Need a little help (or a lot) with piping layout on this boiler install

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-22-14, 03:48 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 357
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Need a little help (or a lot) with piping layout on this boiler install

We are finally getting the New Yorker I pulled out of my basement installed in my friends house and we have a few questions on layout. Some pictures attached. Obviously this is not going to be a modern & clean install but we want to do the best we can. The return would seem to be pretty straight forward. But it's getting it all squeezed in on the feed side that could be tough.

My first question is that red B&H thingy. What I remember is that it's to provide a break in circulation when the pump is not running, just for the normal rise and fall of heated and cooling water. The one in my basement only has two large ports and is inline after the pump. It looks like this also had the fresh water fill coming into the back of it??

Tentative plan is to go up up from the boiler feed directly into the bottom of that B&H piece, using the B&H piece to turn things 90d and give us the fresh water feed out the back. Then directly out of that into the expansion tank. Then turn 90d back towards and into the feed pipes you see with the gate valves on them, sticking the circ pump there.

Assuming that is an allowed setup I think everything would just fit reasonably tidy without going off in strange directions.

Domestic hot water I'm comfortable with. I now what's need there. Also the pictures show two zone valves but they are going away. It never really made sense to zone it off as the house is so small and a recent renovation means it's quite well insulated for an old concrete and block house.

Anything I'm missing? Totally wrong use of the B&H piece?

The return you see was just a test fit. It was plumbed with a drain in place and zone valves cut off. The previous setup had no bypass. We are figuring to ad one, but just trying to get the main pipes set in place and then cut in a bypass once we see the final layout.

Thanks in advance as always.
 
Attached Images       
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-22-14, 04:45 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Hiya Speedy!

that red B&H thingy
I know you mean B & G thingy. Yer only off by one letter!

What I remember is that it's to provide a break in circulation when the pump is not running, just for the normal rise and fall of heated and cooling water. The one in my basement only has two large ports and is inline after the pump. It looks like this also had the fresh water fill coming into the back of it??
It's purpose is to prevent 'ghost flow', 'thermosiphon', or whatever name you want to give it.

Thermosiphon occurs in heating systems when the hotter, more buoyant (lighter) water 'floats' up out of the boiler and pushes the cooler less buoyant (heavier) water back down the return. The result is that flow will continue after the boiler has stopped firing and the pump has stopped.

Inside that "SA FLOW CONTROL" valve is a weighted disc. When the pump runs it pushes the disc up and water flows. Pump stops, disc comes back down. The thermosiphon can't occur because there is not enough force to lift the disc.

The "SA" in the name means STRAIGHT ANGLE. It can be used either way with the other port plugged, or the extra port can be used to connect feed water and expansion tank as it appears was done.

Have you read up on the "Pumping Away" school of design? If not, you should. You have a clean slate to work from and pumping away will eliminate a lot of trouble with air in the system.
 
  #3  
Old 09-22-14, 05:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 357
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Bell and Gosset right? I'm far more used to hearing Bell and Howell - hence the mistake.

Yes to pumping away. My understanding is that you want the pump very close to the outlet of the expansion tank. Which is the plan, albeit with a short 90 in between the tank and the pump. It also sounds like that SA FLOW CONTROL needs to be after the pump, not before.

In that scenario I suspect we'd just cap the bottom plug and use it as a straight through - then put our fresh water fill valve else where in the system.

That is how it was when that boiler was in my house. It came up, turned 90 into the expansion tank > pump > SA FLOW CONTROL and then into the loop. I'll see if I can find a link to what it looked like in my house before it was pulled for the NAT conversion and Versa Hydro install.
 
  #4  
Old 09-22-14, 05:22 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 357
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's before it was pulled from my house. You can see they brought the fresh water in right at the expansion tank and it looks like the bypass comes out right between the pump and the SA FLOW CONTROL. Actually that part is still in place, I just tapped the Versa Hydro right in where the old boiler came out.

Looking at this picture I see a copper overflow pipe coming down the right hand side of the boiler. I don't remember that at all. Going down now to see if I can tell where it used to be.
 
Attached Images  
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: