Opinions on new Boiler?


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Old 10-29-14, 08:21 AM
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Opinions on new Boiler?

My boiler is doing fine, though a tech told me that it had a small leak. He apparently could hear water dripping onto the flame and boiling, causing a hissing noise. I didnt buy into it, but at the same time, my boiler is 1970. I would rahter do the leg work now in case my unit goes in the middle of the night.

I have downloaded the heat loss calculator referenced in this topic and will work on that. Mostly I am wondering what one brand would provide over another, or even brands to really stay away from. I currently have a Hydrotherm HC-145. I will not assume this is the correct unit. I am thinking though maybe go with hydrotherm for no real reason other than it seems like a good solid unit. Opinions, recommendations, general info on "better" brands would be appreciated. Thanks..
 
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Old 10-29-14, 04:27 PM
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He apparently could hear water dripping onto the flame and boiling, causing a hissing noise. I didnt buy into it, but at the same time, my boiler is 1970. I would rahter do the leg work now in case my unit goes in the middle of the night.
Hearing a drip is not necessarily evidence of a boiler leak.

If this occurred on a stone cold start up of the system what he was hearing could very well, and likely was, flue gas condensate dripping inside the boiler.

The way to diagnose a boiler leak is typically by shutting off the feed water supply to the system and monitoring the boiler pressure. If there's a leak, the pressure will start dropping, speed depending on the severity of the leak.

Happy you were skeptical.

Boiler techs often are commissioned salesmen as well. Always keep that in mind!
 
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Old 10-29-14, 04:42 PM
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Just to add, if you do decide to replace the boiler, wait until after the heating system is over.

Prices usually drop then. Right now you'll pay a premium.
 
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Old 10-29-14, 05:39 PM
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I have a Hydrotherm HC-100 that was installed in 1967 and still going strong. I also plan to replace mine next year with a Hydrotherm HWX-105, it seems like these boilers run forever.
I downloaded the Boiler Replacement Guide (heat loss calculator) from the Weil McLain website and under the worst condition the HWX-105 is more than enough. The Weil McLain is also an excelllent choice but since my original boiler is still going strong after 47 years, i will have to go with the HWX-105.
Just my two cents ! !
 
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Old 10-30-14, 12:47 PM
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What is the prevalent thought here on condensing boilers? Do they last? Not? Also what about Utica boilers??? Some bad reviews but I dont know if they represent reality or not.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 01:19 PM
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I have a condensing boiler Dan, a Munchkin Contender MC80, running on propane. It's been 4 years and all that's been done is an inspection/cleaning.

It's quiet, mounts on the wall so takes up very little space, has built in outdoor reset. I have the Superstor Ultra for an indirect as well.

It's actually my second Munchkin. I had one at my prior house and when I bought this one, it needed a boiler, I went with the Contender.

My understanding is that how well it lasts is determined primarily by how well the installation was done.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 02:26 PM
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My concern would be how much condensate does it produce per cubic ft. of gas burned as this determines at what efficiency it is operating at .Thermal efficiency of a boiler with a return water temperature of 80f is 97%. One U.S. gal. of condensate produced by a condensing boiler gives 8050 Btus back free.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 03:38 PM
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Thermal efficiency of a boiler with a return water temperature of 80f is 97%
While that may well be true mathematically, consider how much baseboard one would need to install in order to heat their home with 80-100F water... LOTS! probably not enough wall space... (this is why manufacturers are more and more introducing the high output baseboard.)

The heat output of fin tube baseboard is almost nil at 80F.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 04:24 PM
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I live in a large one bedroom apt. ,bottom floor of a 100 year old house reinsulated in1996 , outside walls basement and celling all R20 .The other 2 upstairs 1bed apt. insulated the same. An attic apt. has slanted insulated ceilings . My apt heated with 85f water through 110 ft of slant fin base board. Out door temperature 46degree f, indoor 73f
 
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Old 10-31-14, 02:47 PM
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Hydrotherms are well known for incredible amounts of flue gas condensation on a cold startup.
Seen many with puddles on the burner tray after a cold startup.

The hissing sound is water flashing to steam as it hits the ribbon burner.
I doubt very much your boiler is leaking
 
 

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