Installing Hydronic Heater in garage


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Old 12-30-14, 09:16 AM
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Installing Hydronic Heater in garage

I recently purchased a hydronic heater for my garage. I know how I want to set it up. I'm going to install a 4th zone on my furnace for the garage that will be run on thermostat placed in the garage. I want to use aquastat to control the fan on the heater. The fan is 120v. I want to run 120v to the aquastat then the 120v to the fan. So the fan will only kick on when the unit has hot water going though the unit and the Aquastat kicks it on at my set water temp.

So here is my question, what Aquastat do I need to purchase? I have looked a many but can't seem to figure out which one. There are so many out there and I could not find one that has a wiring diagram that shows how I want run it.
 
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Old 12-30-14, 09:28 AM
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purchased a hydronic heater
I think you mean a ' unit heater ' ? The kind that hangs from the ceiling?

What make/model did you buy?
 
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Old 12-30-14, 09:38 AM
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Yes it hangs from the ceilinng it is a BP-50 50K BTU Hanging Heater. I got it from here BP-50 50K BTU Hanging Heater

I want the fan to start when the water in the unit reaches certain temp, and shut off when it reached lower temp. This way it is not blowing cold air.
 
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Old 12-30-14, 10:07 AM
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You want one that you can strap to the pipe, as physically close to the heater as possible.

The website doesn't allow downloads of installation manuals, I'm sorta surprised that they don't include temp control of fan as a factory option.

This one should do the job:

L6006C1018 - Honeywell L6006C1018 - High or Low Limit & Circulator Strap-On Aquastat, 65-200F range, 5-30F Adj Differential

When you pipe that up, make sure that you include provision to bleed air from the high point of the piping.
 
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Old 12-30-14, 11:01 AM
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Thank you for the quick replies. I was thinking of an immersion aquastat. Why do you recommend the strap on type? Is there a difference? Is there an immersion aquastst on that will work?

The company does not have instructions. None came with the unit. I called and they wanted to sell me a Lux WIN100 Heating & Cooling Programmable Outlet Thermostat. http://luxproducts.com/thermostats/win100.php

They told me to attach the heater to my furnace so it always has hot water running thru it. Which means my furnace would always be running. Not really a good way to set it up if you ask me.
 

Last edited by waterdowg; 12-30-14 at 11:53 AM.
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Old 12-30-14, 12:59 PM
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An immersion thermostat would require a tee in the piping and ideally a well for the probe. In order to not severely restrict the water flow the tee would usually need to be a size or two larger than the connecting piping along with the necessary reducers. A well insulated strap-on thermostat is far easier and just as effective.

ANY "close on rise" thermostat with a temperature range of about 100 to 240 degrees F. will work for the fan control. The reason for the continuous water flow is to prevent freezing if the room temperature gets too cold. I agree with you that is a lousy control in your situation.

I would suggest a room thermostat controlling a zone valve and setting the room thermostat well above freezing. If you use a programmable thermostat you could also wire a simple on-off thermostat in parallel and have it set to maintain a minimum temperature above freezing regardless of the standard room thermostat. You may need to search a bit to find a thermostat that will go that low but they are available.
 
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Old 12-30-14, 02:30 PM
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Thanks for the information on the. I do plan on putting a room thermostat with a zone valve. Basicly it will run just like a normal zone in my house. But have the fan kick one. The garage is attached to my house and does not really get to freezeing temps but I keep my system filled with Kryotec to prevent freezing so that will not be an issue.
I do have an other question. The unit has 1" in and out fittings. I was planning on knocking it down and running 3/4" to my furnace. But know I'm wondering if I shoud run 1" to the furnace and knock it down at the furnace. Will this give me morre heat or water pressure to the unit?
 
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Old 12-30-14, 07:57 PM
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It seems as if the manufacturer of these unit heaters caters to the outdoor wood boiler crowd. This is probably another reason for the recommendation for constant circulation since that water is always hot...

I agree that taking the 'traditional' approach is wise.

The unit has 1" in and out fittings. I was planning on knocking it down and running 3/4" to my furnace. But know I'm wondering if I shoud run 1" to the furnace and knock it down at the furnace. Will this give me more heat or water pressure to the unit?
I don't think you'll notice any difference really.

My opinion is that you would be fine with 3/4"... but let me ask this:

How far is it from the boiler to the unit heater? How many feet of pipe?
 
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Old 12-30-14, 08:27 PM
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I put the same heater in the un-insulated basement of my house (only turned on when its cold and I want to do work down there)

I just plumbed it up with a zone valve and wired it the same way as a normal baseboard zone. To control the fan, I just wired a Taco switching relay in parallel to the zone valve. It does not seem to take too long for the heat to start coming out of the heater.

I have it plumed with a total of about 80 feet of 3/4 pex. The boiler is a mod/con and I clocked the gas meter with only the one zone on. If I recall correctly it was 34k Natural gas input/hour.
 
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Old 12-31-14, 05:54 AM
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The garage and the furnace room share a wall. So the run of pipe is about 10' max.
 
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Old 12-31-14, 06:00 AM
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Thanks for the info. That seems like another way to wire wire it up. I will have to look at those Taco relay switches. Do you happen know the model of the switch you used?
 
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Old 12-31-14, 06:44 AM
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I did the same with and older Grainger unit I bought used. I intend to just buy one of these.
Elitech 110V All-Purpose Temperature Controller+ Sensor 2 Relay Output Thermostat Stc-1000 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008KVCPH2..._d0.Oub14FSXZB
 
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Old 12-31-14, 10:57 PM
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I ended up using the Taco SR501-4 SR501-4 - Taco SR501-4 - 1 Zone Switching Relay

If you click on the wiring guide PDF on that page, there is a wiring digram that I used on page 2 (4th page of the PDF). It is labeled "Alternative wiring (24 VAC Powered input signal)"

Please note that 120 VAC power is NOT supplied to the transformer in the box. You will get the power to operate the relay from the zone valve controller. (NJT, I'm assuming that a Taco zone valve controller has enough capacity to activate both the zone valve and operate the relay????? I've not had a problem with mine yet)

The fan would be wired in the way the circulator is shown. No need for the TT wiring to the boiler either since the end switch in the zone valve will accomplish this.

Patrick
 
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Old 01-01-15, 08:22 AM
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Patrick, I'm not visualizing what you're describing...

the run of pipe is about 10' max.
I think 3/4" will be fine with that short a distance.

If you do go with an immersion type well though, you do want to do what Furd suggested and bump the pipe size up where the immersion well enters the pipe so as not to block flow. If you come out of the side port on the heat in 1", and then into a 1" threaded tee fitting, you can insert the well into one end of the tee and knock down to 3/4" where the pipe to the boiler comes out.

I believe that the ports on the heater are threaded? So, a short nipple, a threaded tee, etc...

I don't see the need for a relay.

Wire the zone valve as usual to the boiler.

Run 120 to the aquastat, and to the fan.
 
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Old 01-01-15, 11:50 AM
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The pipes on the unit are not threaded so I have to sweat everything. I have decided not to go with the immersion type. I will be using 3/4" pipe. Below is a diagram of how I plan to do it. Please let me know if I need to do anything different.

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Old 01-01-15, 02:17 PM
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Mount the aquastat on the discharge piping from the heater, otherwise the fan will start before the heater is filled with hot water and it will blow cold for a minute. Be sure to thoroughly insulate the aquastat and pipe where it is attached. All the rest looks good to me.
 
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Old 01-01-15, 02:30 PM
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Looks good to me too.

insulate the aquastat and pipe where it is attached
Ditto the insulation, and at least 2' in either direction from the a'stat.

Being in a garage, you might want to fashion some sort of air filter to keep as much dust out of the unit as possible.

Other than that, go for it!
 
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Old 01-01-15, 02:39 PM
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Thank you. I will put it on the discharge. As for the filter. I was thinking of doing something so dust does not clogg the heater core.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 12:40 AM
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NJ Trooper, I have a three zone Taco zone valve controller. The heater I have is setup with the piping/thermostat/zone valve setup the same way as you would do baseboard.

To operate the fan, I used a switching relay. I found this pic on another thread. I wired it up as shown on #3 but without the TT wires. switching relay wiring. The 24 VAC source for this relay comes from the same zone valve controller output as the zone valve motor is connected to.

That make more sense to you?

Patrick
 
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Old 01-03-15, 09:05 AM
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Hi Patrick,

Yes, it makes sense in that I now understand what you did...

It doesn't address Dowg's desire to have the fan run only when the water is hot.

I do think that the issue of blowing cool for a few minutes in a garage is perhaps not that important really, but what he was asking was for how to keep that from happening.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 03:17 PM
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The wayI was asking about was suggested to me by a plumber that was working at my office. I'm open to all suggestions. I would like to keep this simple. As I think this over more, I don't think the cold air blowing will be an issue as its only about 10 feet from the furnace. That was somehting the plumber suggested.
Now can we discuss Patricks set up? Will that work for me? I'm going to have to install a Zone Valve and would need to have thermostat. Patricks setup seems simple. Just not sure how to wire it up with a thermostat.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 03:40 PM
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Really, either way is about the same cost and complexity. The relay is slightly less expensive than the aquastat I believe...

What make/model zone valve will you be using?
 
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Old 01-03-15, 03:53 PM
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Once I know zone valve, can get more specific, but this is what I would do...

You're running 120VAC to the relay anyway...

 
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Old 01-03-15, 03:57 PM
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I would like to use a Honeywell V8043E1012
 
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Old 01-03-15, 04:13 PM
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OK, then in that case, the RED wires from the zone valve are what connect to the T T terminals of the relay.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 04:49 PM
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Ok, so 1 red wire to 6 (N/O) and the other to 5. What about the Yellow wires and how does this get attached to my furnace?
 
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Old 01-03-15, 06:39 PM
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so 1 red wire to 6 (N/O) and the other to 5
Ummm... no, I don't think so. At least if I understand what you're saying...

The two RED wires from the new zone valve will connect to the T(R) and T(W) on the relay.

The wires from 6 (N/O) and 5 will go back to the other zone valves where their RED wires are connected in parallel and then off to the boiler... and will attach along with those.

I sorta thought you knew how to wire the zone valve so I didn't 'go there'.

You already must have some zone valves, correct? Are they also Honeywell V8043E series?

Are they wired to a control panel, or are there individual wires dangling around?

You should also have a 24VAC transformer to power those zone valves, correct?

If you have something different, let me know.

If you can take some pics of your system it might help save some words.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 08:10 PM
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Sorry for the confusion. You have been a great help. Attached are a few pictures of what I have. I have 3 Honeywell V8043E1012 valves. The red wires go to TT1 and TT2 on the controller. The yellow wires is were it gets confusing. Looks like 1 yellow from each goes to their thermostat. The other yellow wire from each valve goes to the transformer.

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Old 01-03-15, 10:54 PM
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Yeah, you've got what I call "Rat's nest wiring".

The yellow wires is were it gets confusing. Looks like 1 yellow from each goes to their thermostat. The other yellow wire from each valve goes to the transformer.
Yes, from the transformer, one of the 24VAC wires goes to one side of ALL the thermostats.

The OTHER 24VAC wire from the transformer goes to one yellow of ALL the zone valves.

The other side of EACH thermostat goes to the other yellow of the respective zone valve.

You simply need to duplicate this for the new zone valve.

That's all you have is the THREE zone valves now, correct?

You can run up to FIVE on a typical 40VA transformer. ( I personally don't like to see more than FOUR, but that's just personal preference)
 
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Old 01-03-15, 10:59 PM
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This graphic shows two valves... to add more, just continue the same wiring pattern:



Motor is yellow, Endswitch is red.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 04:57 AM
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Thanks you. I that already understood. When I was going to use the Honeywell 6006C1018 Aquastat. Thank for verifying what I assumed. I'm not sure how this all get tied in to the Taco Relay switch.
You posted the diagram and that has R W From Zone Valve End Switch. Then you have 6 5 in parallel with other ZV endswitches. This is were I get confused. I'm assuming the enter point of the Taco relay is to turn on the fan. I'm just not seeing how that happens.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 09:51 AM
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This help?



Zone valve endswitch turns on relay, fan runs, heat call is sent to boiler.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 06:56 PM
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Yes that is perfect. Thank you so much. Once I get it done I will report back.
 
 

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