Aquastat and Outdoor Reset Questions


  #41  
Old 01-30-15, 02:15 PM
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Thanks NJ Trooper.

I heard back from Supplyhouse. They said the part I need is a Raypak Temperature Controller 014307F. The website below has a pick of what it looks like
Raypak Commercial RayTherm 014307F Adj. Auto High Limit - Parts4Heating.com

It seems like the Raypak Temp Controller is the one to go with...unless you think I should go with the L6008G1009/B instead. Was Eli at Supplyhouse? What did he think? Thanks again for all your help!
 
  #42  
Old 01-30-15, 04:03 PM
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Yeah, I found that part earlier myself. Something's wrong...

Either the picture does not represent what you are getting (that pic is NOT a 2 stage control), or it's the wrong part, possibly for a different boiler (not with a 2 stage gas valve).

IF the picture is correct, it is CLEARLY not the right part. If you enlarge the picture you can see the part number L4080D 1127 on it.

If you search that site for that part number, you find the exact same control for twice the price...

Parts4heating.com: Teledyne Laars, raypak, pentair, hayward, lochinvar, jandy, zodiac heater repair parts and spares

So no, I would not recommend that one...

I personally would go with this one:

RE0093200 - Laars RE0093200 - L6008G1009 130/230F Aquastat

The ONLY difference that I can see is that your current control has a temp range of 100-200F and this one is 130-230F. Your operating range of 180F is within the range of either.

Yes, Eli is at SupplyHouse... he seemed to more or less agree with me, but was 'sort of' non-committal because it's not the part number in 'the book' for your boiler.

I think I mentioned this before... but will say again...

Honeywell assigns 'flavor' numbers to controls for various OEM. This means that in general, you won't be able to find specs on that particular part because of proprietary agreements between the OEM and Honeywell. It basically forces a person to buy from the OEM at marked up price.

So, bottom line is that the 1009 and the 1025 are 'practically' an identical part, other than the temp range, which is not an issue.
 
  #43  
Old 01-30-15, 04:07 PM
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There's one thing that just occurred to me though...

The length of the capillary tube.

I don't see that in the specs... I wonder if the 1009 has the same length tubing?
 
  #44  
Old 01-30-15, 09:19 PM
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Table 2. page 7, L6008G should be 72 inches.

https://customer.honeywell.com/resou...0s/60-2104.pdf

See fig 32,29 for operation.
 
  #45  
Old 02-21-15, 09:08 PM
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I installed the L6008G1009 yesterday. Seems to work well. I am now able to set the boiler water temp high heat at 180 and below. I have not installed an outdoor reset yet.

I did some research on optimal boiler cycle times. It appears my boiler might be short cycling. From 100 to 170 (current high limit setting) the boiler runs for 7 minutes...the boiler stops at 170 and the circulator continues to run. After 4 minutes the water temp drops to 150 and the boiler fires back up for about 1 minute and 45 seconds...then the boiler cuts off for 4 minutes with the circulator still running (from 170 to 150)...boiler fires back up for 1 min 45 secs...this process continues until the thermostat stops calling for heat. Do these run times seem too short?

Thanks for the help!
 
  #46  
Old 02-21-15, 09:29 PM
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Are those run times based on a heat call that is significantly changing the room temp? Such as from a setback to a lower temp up to a higher temp?

The 7 minute run is fine. The boiler is getting hot, any condensate will dry out.

The shorter runs on the subsequent firings I'm afraid you're going to have to live with.

What it means is that the boiler has a significantly higher BTU output than you're taking out of the water.

Theoretically, if the boiler were sized exactly to the heat loss of the home on a DESIGN DAY (the lowest outdoor temperature for which the system is designed) AND the radiation in the home ALSO EQUALS the heat loss of the home, the boiler would run non-stop, 100% of the time that the outdoor temperature was at design.

If the boiler is LARGER than need be, the water will heat faster than the radiators can take it out. What happens then is exactly what you describe, the boiler 'bounces off the high limit'.

Also, anytime that the outdoor temperature is above the design temperature, even if the boiler is correctly sized for the design temperature, the same thing will happen... because at any temperature above design, the boiler is oversized.

Remind me ... you have fin-tube baseboard, yes?

Did we talk about popping the covers and vacuuming the dust from the fins? This would increase the heat output of the radiators and there might not be as many subsequent burner cycles.
 
  #47  
Old 02-21-15, 10:19 PM
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Are those run times based on a heat call that is significantly changing the room temp? Such as from a setback to a lower temp up to a higher temp?
I turned the thermostat down to 64 degrees to allow the water to cool to 100. Then I increased the thermostat to 67 (normal setting) to get the boiler to fire up. So the 7 min run time was based on a fairly big thermostat change. However, the 1min 45sec boiler and 4 min circ are consistent even if a zone thermostat needs to call for heat because of a drop from 67 to 66...to get it back to 67 degrees.

Thanks for the info. I did a quick heat loss calc on a couple of different sites. The range was from 80k-100k BTUs for this house. The current boiler is 180k BTUs...so it definitely seems oversized.

Remind me ... you have fin-tube baseboard, yes?

Did we talk about popping the covers and vacuuming the dust from the fins? This would increase the heat output of the radiators and there might not be as many subsequent burner cycles.
Yep, fin-tube baseboard. I vacuumed all the baseboard rads before moving into the house in April 2014, so they should still be pretty clean. This house has three zones....2nd story, 1st story and basement. The basement zone has been shut off since I moved in...it is actually an open loop without a zone valve...so if the boiler is running, the basement zone would have water running through it. Maybe I should open up the basement loop to help increase the burner cycles?
 
  #48  
Old 02-22-15, 07:35 PM
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Something sounds wrong, can you show us the wiring terminals on the new L6008G? Left switch is low fire, Right switch is High fire?

From cold (less than 140F) can you observe the burner and verify that it is starting on high fire (~ 3 to 4 inch flame.)
then going to low fire ( ~ 1/4 inch flame) at the temp set on the set-point indicator (160F ) and finally off at set-point plus interstage Differential (170F.)

It should re-light at low fire when the temperature falls below the Left switch differential (Fixed 3 or 3.6 F )
 
  #49  
Old 02-22-15, 07:45 PM
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That control may have an ADJUSTABLE interstage diff. Some of the 'G' models do.
 
 

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