How hard is it to replace this gauge ?


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Old 02-16-15, 03:33 PM
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How hard is it to replace this gauge ?

This is from my in-laws boiler. It is side-mounted. Having issues with air in the line. Looking to increase pressure to help push the air out, but don't want to do it blind. Besides, the boiler should have a working gauge anyway.

Thanks in advance for any guidance.

 
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Old 02-16-15, 03:50 PM
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It's not difficult: with a wrench, unthread the gauge after depressurizing and partially draining the system. But, it appears that behind the gauge is lagging around the boiler that would need to be removed? Or maybe you can just remove the chrome bezel around the gauge?
 
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Old 02-16-15, 04:37 PM
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Or abandon in place and add external pressure gauge.

Read this:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...ure-gauge.html
 
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Old 02-17-15, 05:48 AM
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ah !

that's very cool (in a hot sort of way)...............
 
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Old 02-20-15, 05:00 AM
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So, replaced the gauge. Wasn't hard at all. Also replaced reducing valve which was rusted shut and barely letting any water in. Now that I have a working gauge, reading just over 25 psi while running (this is for second floor apartment), so I assume this is ok. I also discovered the expansion tank is full, so that will be this weekend's project. Hopefully that will help with the high-ish pressure. Was able to bleed A TON of air out of the line.

Thanks for the help
 
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Old 02-20-15, 05:16 AM
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reading just over 25 psi while running (this is for second floor apartment), so I assume this is ok. I also discovered the expansion tank is full, so that will be this weekend's project. Hopefully that will help with the high-ish pressure.
You said "while running", but did you happen to note at what TEMERATURE you saw that pressure?

Yes, it is a bit high, and correcting the expansion tank should solve that.

What type of expansion tank is on the system? Large steel in the ceiling above the boiler? or bladder/diaphragm type hanging from the pipes?
 
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Old 02-20-15, 05:27 AM
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Temp was 180 - tank is on the pipes.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 07:47 AM
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Did you see the instructions for servicing that tank? Step by step included here:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...sion-tank.html
 
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Old 02-20-15, 07:59 AM
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I did now - thanks. Will give it a shot, but the tank is pretty old. I'm pretty sure it is a rupture.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 08:04 AM
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Might just be best to cut the losses and install new. If you add those optional valves shown at the end of the article, maintenance is super easy. If the tank pressure is maintained bi-annually, that new tank will last a LONG time.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 08:39 AM
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Got it - thanks a lot. I'm ready for spring.
 
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Old 02-25-15, 11:04 AM
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20 PSI at 180 degrees.

Thanks.
 
 

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