Upstairs too hot! with radiators!

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Old 02-20-15, 05:56 PM
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Upstairs too hot! with radiators!

This is all I know so far. One zone small Dutch colonial 2 story. I thought this would be steam she is telling me it is Hot Water. Heading over to check things out in the next week. The furnace was recently replaced within the past few years, I would of thought a good provider would of installed a second zone?
She claims by being comfortable downstairs its way too hot upstairs.?
FYI: Domestic HOT Water is a separate unit.
What if any quick fix can be done to possibly reduce heat upstairs.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 06:29 PM
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Need to know a whole lot more details before formulating an answer. If she has baseboard convectors upstairs try wrapping the finned tube element with heavy duty aluminum foil for about a third of the length.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 06:40 PM
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Install a globe valve in the pipe to upstairs, and throttle it for correct temperature.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 10:16 PM
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never mentioned baseboard?? Furd Stand up RADIATORS
gilmorrie would that be installing the globe valve upstairs or in the basement?
So restricting the amount of water allowed in the loop should solve the issue?
 
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Old 02-20-15, 10:30 PM
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installing the globe valve upstairs or in the basement?
We couldn't answer that without know how the piping is run.

Yes.... you need to reduce the water flow to the second floor but where will take some detective work.
 
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Old 02-20-15, 11:56 PM
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never mentioned baseboard?? Furd Stand up RADIATORS
That is why I wrote if. You gave almost zero information and some people use the term radiator to mean anything that releases heat.

You MAY be able to install thermostatic radiator valves IF the second floor is on a loop all of its own. You MAY be able to install a single zone valve with a conventional thermostat depending on other variables. I would need pictures of the piping to make any kind of determination.

IF the second floor radiators are connected in series with any of the first floor radiators then it will be a much bigger job to isolate the second floor.
 
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Old 02-21-15, 08:33 AM
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It sounds more to me like a thermosiphon (aka ghost flow, gravity flow, and other names) issue.

I bet when the BOILER was replaced they either removed, left open, or neglected to install flow check valves to prevent this.

My opinion is that adding a valve won't work. Tried it, no joy... if it's thermosiphon, only thing that will cure it is properly placed flow check valve.
 
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