air quality

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Old 03-13-15, 10:55 PM
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air quality

My home was originally built in 1880 and when I bought it in 2002 I had an addition put on that included my master bedroom on the second floor. The home is heated by hot water baseboard. In the winter when the heat is on it is difficult for me to sleep in the master bedroom because I get very dry and my nose gets clogged and I have to sleep in the bedroom in the original part of house where it is fine. At almost the very moment that I go to the older room I clear up. I'm not sure why there is a difference but there is. There seems to be a humidification problem and I don't know what to do about it. Does anyone have any ideas how I can get that air better? Thanks.

Rich
 
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Old 03-13-15, 11:44 PM
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Air leakage brings in dry outside air with no moisture. Your new bedroom is probably better insulated and has less air infiltration from outside then the old room.

Why not try a cool mist humidifier in the master bedroom ?
 

Last edited by PJmax; 03-14-15 at 09:41 AM. Reason: Thanks Droo....corrected mistake
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Old 03-14-15, 04:49 AM
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PJmax, the opposite happens in the winter. Air leakage brings dry air into the house.
 
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Old 03-14-15, 05:49 AM
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One of the difficulties with baseboard hot water is no air circulation, thus humidity levels in one area can be different from another.

I would start with a couple of inexpensive meters to keep track of relative humidity and temperature in the different rooms. I'll attach a calculator that can be used to compare RH readings at different temperatures. You wouldn't want to chase humidity issues if it is an allergy problem.

Bud
Temperature, Dewpoint, and Relative Humidity Calculator
 
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Old 03-14-15, 06:25 AM
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Don't rule out an alergie to a specific material in the new bedroom, is it carpeted?
 
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Old 03-14-15, 07:08 AM
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Vermont adopted a state-wide Energy Building Code in 1995 which required new residential buildings and any new additions of over 499 SF to be so air tight and thoroughly insulated that it created similar breathing problems shortly thereafter.

They then had to modify the Code in 2004 to implement a Ventilation component to make these areas less unhealthy for the occupants . . . . with some form of forced air exchange.

It will be decades before we fully know the ramifications of that original mistake.

It's another aspect of the Law of Unintended Consequences.
 
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Old 03-14-15, 08:20 AM
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PJmax, the opposite happens in the winter. Air leakage brings dry air into the house.
Not in my neck of the woods. Moderate winters, temperatures in the high forties to low fifties and RH at 90% and higher definitely allows the inside RH to rise.

It has rained a half-inch during the last ten hours and the current outside temperature is 51 degrees. My indoor RH is definitely going up.
 
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Old 03-14-15, 09:13 AM
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Why not try a cool mist humidifier in the master bedroom ?
I would not consider one of those myself. If you don't use distilled water in it you will end up with 'dust' from the minerals in the water all over the place. The water comes out as micro droplets that then evaporate and leave behind the calcium and magnesium from the water. If you use one you will also need to run an electrostatic air cleaner to remove them.

Air leakage brings dry air into the house.
That is basically true.

RELATIVE humidity is based on air temperature. Any time air is heated without adding humidity during the fact, the RELATIVE humidity DROPS like a stone.

Winter outdoor air is generally dry to start with, heat it up and it gets even dryer.

If I don't put about 5 gallons a day into my home's air the RH runs about 20% or so. I think the Sahara is about 17%. Humans are comfortable at around 40-50 or there about, but running RH that high in the winter and you risk mold issues where the water condenses on cooler surfaces, exterior walls, behind and under furniture, window glass, inside ceiling light fixtures, etc...
 
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Old 03-14-15, 09:15 AM
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I would start with a couple of inexpensive meters to keep track of relative humidity and temperature in the different rooms.
Me too. Can't attack a problem without proper data. You need to know what the problem really is in order to solve it.

Don't rule out an alergy to a specific material in the new bedroom
Ditto that.

Anyone remember the Chinese drywall fiasco of several years back?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_drywall
 
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